14
try
{
     object result = processClass.InvokeMethod("Create", methodArgs);
}
catch (Exception e)
{  
    // Here I was hoping to get an error code.
}

When I invoke the above WMI method I am expected to get Access Denied. In my catch block I want to make sure that the exception raised was indeed for Access Denied. Is there a way I can get the error code for it ? Win32 error code for Acceess Denied is 5. I dont want to search the error message for denied string or anything like that.

Thanks

  • 2
    Run the code, put a break point in your catch block, and use the debugger to look at the exception and see what information you have. – Joel Coehoorn Aug 1 '11 at 0:03
  • Alternatively, you could run the code without bothering to debug and print out the Exception type with GetType(). But Joel's answer will also do the trick for sure. – KyleM Aug 1 '11 at 0:07
  • You should only catch the exact type of exception you expect; catching Exception is almost always a bad code smell. – Bevan Aug 1 '11 at 1:06
  • @Bevan catching Exception is almost always good idea. Because you don't have to show a message at once — an every class shouldn't know does the app works with GUI or terminal. So you just have to save an exception ID to show it in a far far away. No need to catch every exception exclusively to do the same thing. At least it was the way I worked in C++. Now I'm work with C#, but don't see a reason that could make here a difference. – Hi-Angel Oct 3 '14 at 15:26
30

try this to check the exception and the inner one for a Win32Exception derived exception.

catch (Exception e){  
    var w32ex = e as Win32Exception;
    if(w32ex == null) {
        w32ex = e.InnerException as Win32Exception;
    }    
    if(w32ex != null) {
        int code =  w32ex.ErrorCode;
        // do stuff
    }    
    // do other stuff   
}

As in the comments, you really need to see what exception is actually being thrown to understand what you can do, and in which case a specific catch is preferred over just catching Exception. Something like:

  catch (BlahBlahException ex){  
      // do stuff   
  }

Also System.Exception has a HRESULT

 catch (Exception ex){  
     int code = ex.HResult;
 }

However it's only available from .net 4.5 upwards.

  • Since this question is kinda old, this is just a reminder for people who would like to use this answer: For .NET 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 you will have to use reflection to get the value of the HResult property as it is marked protected. Source: stackoverflow.com/questions/15462675/… – curiousBoy Sep 29 '14 at 17:16
4

You should look at the members of the thrown exception, particularly .Message and .InnerException.

I would also see whether or not the documentation for InvokeMethod tells you whether it throws some more specialized Exception class than Exception - such as the Win32Exception suggested by @Preet. Catching and just looking at the Exception base class may not be particularly useful.

3

Building on Preet Sangha's solution, the following should safely cover the scenario where you're working with a large solution with the potential for several Inner Exceptions.

 try
 {
     object result = processClass.InvokeMethod("Create", methodArgs);
 }
 catch (Exception e)
 {
     // Here I was hoping to get an error code.
     if (ExceptionContainsErrorCode(e, 10004))
     {
         // Execute desired actions
     }
 }

...

private bool ExceptionContainsErrorCode(Exception e, int ErrorCode)
{
    Win32Exception winEx = e as Win32Exception;
    if (winEx != null && ErrorCode == winEx.ErrorCode) 
        return true;

    if (e.InnerException != null) 
        return ExceptionContainsErrorCode(e.InnerException, ErrorCode);

    return false;
}

This code has been unit tested.

I won't harp too much on the need for coming to appreciate and implement good practice when it comes to Exception Handling by managing each expected Exception Type within their own blocks.

  • Small improvement in C# 6, you can change your first if statement to the bottom line. The first part checks for null, and fails the if condition when winEx == null. Then it safely checks the ErrorCode property without throwing a null exception. if (winEx?.ErrorCode == ErrorCode) – Andrew S Jun 23 '17 at 22:01
1

I suggest you to use Message Properte from The Exception Object Like below code

try
{
 object result = processClass.InvokeMethod("Create", methodArgs);
}
catch (Exception e)
{  
    //use Console.Write(e.Message); from Console Application 
    //and use MessageBox.Show(e.Message); from WindowsForm and WPF Application
}
0

Another method would be to get the error code from the exception class directly. For example:

catch (Exception ex)
{
    if (ex.InnerException is ServiceResponseException)
       {
        ServiceResponseException srex = ex.InnerException as ServiceResponseException;
        string ErrorCode = srex.ErrorCode.ToString();
       }
}

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