How to get the value 'foo' which is returned from the thread?

from threading import Thread

def foo(bar):
    print 'hello {}'.format(bar)
    return 'foo'

thread = Thread(target=foo, args=('world!',))
thread.start()
ret = thread.join()
print ret

The one obvious way to do it, shown above, returns None.

20 Answers 20

up vote 188 down vote accepted

FWIW, the multiprocessing module has a nice interface for this using the Pool class. And if you want to stick with threads rather than processes, you can just use the multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool class as a drop-in replacement.

def foo(bar, baz):
  print 'hello {0}'.format(bar)
  return 'foo' + baz

from multiprocessing.pool import ThreadPool
pool = ThreadPool(processes=1)

async_result = pool.apply_async(foo, ('world', 'foo')) # tuple of args for foo

# do some other stuff in the main process

return_val = async_result.get()  # get the return value from your function.
  • 1
    @CornSmith not sure what you mean... works fine for me in python 2.7.5... Just don't forget to wrap the arguments in a tuple (object1,): def foo2(testinstance): print 'hello {0}'.format(testinstance.bar) class testme(object): def __init__(self, bar): self.bar = bar async_result = pool.apply_async(foo2, (testme('I am bar'),)) – Jake Biesinger May 6 '14 at 4:11
  • 12
    @JakeBiesinger My point is, that I was looking for answer, how to get response from Thread, came here, and accepted answer doesn't answer question stated. I differantiate threads and processes. I know about Global Interpreter Lock however I'm working on I/O bound problem so Threads are ok, I don't need processes. Other answers here better answer question stated. – omikron Apr 19 '15 at 9:17
  • 4
    @omikron But threads in python don't return a response unless you use a subclass that enables this functionality. Of possible subclasses, ThreadPools are a great choice (choose # of threads, use map/apply w/sync/async). Despite being imported from multiprocess, they have nothing to do with Processes. – Jake Biesinger Apr 20 '15 at 2:17
  • 3
    @JakeBiesinger Oh, I'm blind. Sorry for my unnecessary comments. You are right. I just assumed that multiprocessing = processes. – omikron Apr 20 '15 at 9:25
  • 8
    Don't forget to set processes=1 to more than one if you have more threads! – iman Jun 16 '15 at 11:46

One way I've seen is to pass a mutable object, such as a list or a dictionary, to the thread's constructor, along with a an index or other identifier of some sort. The thread can then store its results in its dedicated slot in that object. For example:

def foo(bar, result, index):
    print 'hello {0}'.format(bar)
    result[index] = "foo"

from threading import Thread

threads = [None] * 10
results = [None] * 10

for i in range(len(threads)):
    threads[i] = Thread(target=foo, args=('world!', results, i))
    threads[i].start()

# do some other stuff

for i in range(len(threads)):
    threads[i].join()

print " ".join(results)  # what sound does a metasyntactic locomotive make?

If you really want join() to return the return value of the called function, you can do this with a Thread subclass like the following:

from threading import Thread

def foo(bar):
    print 'hello {0}'.format(bar)
    return "foo"

class ThreadWithReturnValue(Thread):
    def __init__(self, group=None, target=None, name=None,
                 args=(), kwargs={}, Verbose=None):
        Thread.__init__(self, group, target, name, args, kwargs, Verbose)
        self._return = None
    def run(self):
        if self._Thread__target is not None:
            self._return = self._Thread__target(*self._Thread__args,
                                                **self._Thread__kwargs)
    def join(self):
        Thread.join(self)
        return self._return

twrv = ThreadWithReturnValue(target=foo, args=('world!',))

twrv.start()
print twrv.join()   # prints foo

That gets a little hairy because of some name mangling, and it accesses "private" data structures that are specific to Thread implementation... but it works.

For python3

class ThreadWithReturnValue(Thread):
    def __init__(self, group=None, target=None, name=None,
                 args=(), kwargs={}, Verbose=None):
        Thread.__init__(self, group, target, name, args, kwargs)
        self._return = None
    def run(self):
        print(type(self._target))
        if self._target is not None:
            self._return = self._target(*self._args,
                                                **self._kwargs)
    def join(self):
        Thread.join(self)
        return self._return
  • thanks, i can see that that would be fine as a workaround, but it changes the function definition so that it doesn't really return anything. i wanted to know in my original case, where does that 'foo' actually go...? – wim Aug 2 '11 at 3:53
  • 18
    cool, thanks for the example! i wonder why Thread was not implemented with handling a return value in the first place, it seems like an obvious enough thing to support. – wim Aug 3 '11 at 1:28
  • 10
    I think this should be the accepted answer - the OP asked for threading, not a different library to try, plus the pool size limitation introduces an additional potential problem, which happened in my case. – domoarigato Jan 31 '15 at 20:05
  • 7
    Great train joke. – meawoppl Nov 28 '15 at 21:53
  • 5
    On python3 this returns TypeError: __init__() takes from 1 to 6 positional arguments but 7 were given . Any way to fix that? – GuySoft Oct 30 '16 at 15:20

Jake's answer is good, but if you don't want to use a threadpool (you don't know how many threads you'll need, but create them as needed) then a good way to transmit information between threads is the built-in Queue.Queue class, as it offers thread safety.

I created the following decorator to make it act in a similar fashion to the threadpool:

def threaded(f, daemon=False):
    import Queue

    def wrapped_f(q, *args, **kwargs):
        '''this function calls the decorated function and puts the 
        result in a queue'''
        ret = f(*args, **kwargs)
        q.put(ret)

    def wrap(*args, **kwargs):
        '''this is the function returned from the decorator. It fires off
        wrapped_f in a new thread and returns the thread object with
        the result queue attached'''

        q = Queue.Queue()

        t = threading.Thread(target=wrapped_f, args=(q,)+args, kwargs=kwargs)
        t.daemon = daemon
        t.start()
        t.result_queue = q        
        return t

    return wrap

Then you just use it as:

@threaded
def long_task(x):
    import time
    x = x + 5
    time.sleep(5)
    return x

# does not block, returns Thread object
y = long_task(10)
print y

# this blocks, waiting for the result
result = y.result_queue.get()
print result

The decorated function creates a new thread each time it's called and returns a Thread object that contains the queue that will receive the result.

UPDATE

It's been quite a while since I posted this answer, but it still gets views so I thought I would update it to reflect the way I do this in newer versions of Python:

Python 3.2 added in the concurrent.futures module which provides a high-level interface for parallel tasks. It provides ThreadPoolExecutor and ProcessPoolExecutor, so you can use a thread or process pool with the same api.

One benefit of this api is that submitting a task to an Executor returns a Future object, which will complete with the return value of the callable you submit.

This makes attaching a queue object unnecessary, which simplifies the decorator quite a bit:

_DEFAULT_POOL = ThreadPoolExecutor()

def threadpool(f, executor=None):
    @wraps(f)
    def wrap(*args, **kwargs):
        return (executor or _DEFAULT_POOL).submit(f, *args, **kwargs)

    return wrap

This will use a default module threadpool executor if one is not passed in.

The usage is very similar to before:

@threadpool
def long_task(x):
    import time
    x = x + 5
    time.sleep(5)
    return x

# does not block, returns Future object
y = long_task(10)
print y

# this blocks, waiting for the result
result = y.result()
print result

If you're using Python 3.4+, one really nice feature of using this method (and Future objects in general) is that the returned future can be wrapped to turn it into an asyncio.Future with asyncio.wrap_future. This makes it work easily with coroutines:

result = await asyncio.wrap_future(long_task(10))

If you don't need access to the underlying concurrent.Future object, you can include the wrap in the decorator:

_DEFAULT_POOL = ThreadPoolExecutor()

def threadpool(f, executor=None):
    @wraps(f)
    def wrap(*args, **kwargs):
        return asyncio.wrap_future((executor or _DEFAULT_POOL).submit(f, *args, **kwargs))

    return wrap

Then, whenever you need to push cpu intensive or blocking code off the event loop thread, you can put it in a decorated function:

@threadpool
def some_long_calculation():
    ...

# this will suspend while the function is executed on a threadpool
result = await some_long_calculation()
  • I can't seem to get this to work; I get an error stating AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'Lock' this appears to be emanating from the line y = long_task(10)... thoughts? – sadmicrowave Sep 13 '13 at 2:26
  • 1
    The code doesn't explicitly use Lock, so the problem could be somewhere else in your code. You may want to post a new SO question about it – bj0 Sep 14 '13 at 4:18
  • Why is result_queue an instance attribute? Would it be better if it was a class attribute so that users won't have to know to call result_queue when using @threaded which is not explicit and ambiguous? – t88 Aug 8 '17 at 18:56
  • @t88, not sure what you mean, you need some way of accessing the result, which means you need to know what to call. If you want it to be something else you can subclass Thread and do what you want (this was a simple solution). The reason the queue needs to be attached to the thread is so that multiple calls/functions have their own queues – bj0 Aug 9 '17 at 19:24

Another solution that doesn't require changing your existing code:

import Queue
from threading import Thread

def foo(bar):
    print 'hello {0}'.format(bar)
    return 'foo'

que = Queue.Queue()

t = Thread(target=lambda q, arg1: q.put(foo(arg1)), args=(que, 'world!'))
t.start()
t.join()
result = que.get()
print result

It can be also easily adjusted to a multi-threaded environment:

import Queue
from threading import Thread

def foo(bar):
    print 'hello {0}'.format(bar)
    return 'foo'

que = Queue.Queue()
threads_list = list()

t = Thread(target=lambda q, arg1: q.put(foo(arg1)), args=(que, 'world!'))
t.start()
threads_list.append(t)

# Add more threads here
...
threads_list.append(t2)
...
threads_list.append(t3)
...

# Join all the threads
for t in threads_list:
    t.join()

# Check thread's return value
while not que.empty():
    result = que.get()
    print result
  • t = Thread(target=lambda q, arg1: q.put(foo(arg1)), args=(que, 'world!')) whats q.put doing here, what does the Queue.Queue() does – vijay shanker Oct 29 '16 at 21:54
  • que = Queue.Queue() - creates a queue q.put(foo) - inserts foo() into the queue – Arik Nov 5 '16 at 11:09
  • right !! i am delighted – vijay shanker Nov 7 '16 at 9:33
  • 2
    There should be a statue of you in your hometown, thank you! – Onilol Apr 18 at 21:21
  • @Onilol - Thank you very much. Your comment is exactly the reason I do this :) – Arik Apr 21 at 14:58

Parris / kindall's answer join/return answer ported to Python 3:

from threading import Thread

def foo(bar):
    print('hello {0}'.format(bar))
    return "foo"

class ThreadWithReturnValue(Thread):
    def __init__(self, group=None, target=None, name=None, args=(), kwargs=None, *, daemon=None):
        Thread.__init__(self, group, target, name, args, kwargs, daemon=daemon)

        self._return = None

    def run(self):
        if self._target is not None:
            self._return = self._target(*self._args, **self._kwargs)

    def join(self):
        Thread.join(self)
        return self._return


twrv = ThreadWithReturnValue(target=foo, args=('world!',))

twrv.start()
print(twrv.join())   # prints foo

Note, the Thread class is implemented differently in Python 3.

  • join takes a timeout parameter that should be passed along – c z Jan 5 '17 at 11:57

I stole kindall's answer and cleaned it up just a little bit.

The key part is adding *args and **kwargs to join() in order to handle the timeout

class threadWithReturn(Thread):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(threadWithReturn, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

        self._return = None

    def run(self):
        if self._Thread__target is not None:
            self._return = self._Thread__target(*self._Thread__args, **self._Thread__kwargs)

    def join(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(threadWithReturn, self).join(*args, **kwargs)

        return self._return

UPDATED ANSWER BELOW

This is my most popularly upvoted answer, so I decided to update with code that will run on both py2 and py3.

Additionally, I see many answers to this question that show a lack of comprehension regarding Thread.join(). Some completely fail to handle the timeout arg. But there is also a corner-case that you should be aware of regarding instances when you have (1) a target function that can return None and (2) you also pass the timeout arg to join(). Please see "TEST 4" to understand this corner case.

ThreadWithReturn class that works with py2 and py3:

import sys
from threading import Thread
from builtins import super    # https://stackoverflow.com/a/30159479

if sys.version_info >= (3, 0):
    _thread_target_key = '_target'
    _thread_args_key = '_args'
    _thread_kwargs_key = '_kwargs'
else:
    _thread_target_key = '_Thread__target'
    _thread_args_key = '_Thread__args'
    _thread_kwargs_key = '_Thread__kwargs'

class ThreadWithReturn(Thread):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super().__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self._return = None

    def run(self):
        target = getattr(self, _thread_target_key)
        if not target is None:
            self._return = target(*getattr(self, _thread_args_key), **getattr(self, _thread_kwargs_key))

    def join(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super().join(*args, **kwargs)
        return self._return

Some sample tests are shown below:

import time, random

# TEST TARGET FUNCTION
def giveMe(arg, seconds=None):
    if not seconds is None:
        time.sleep(seconds)
    return arg

# TEST 1
my_thread = ThreadWithReturn(target=giveMe, args=('stringy',))
my_thread.start()
returned = my_thread.join()
# (returned == 'stringy')

# TEST 2
my_thread = ThreadWithReturn(target=giveMe, args=(None,))
my_thread.start()
returned = my_thread.join()
# (returned is None)

# TEST 3
my_thread = ThreadWithReturn(target=giveMe, args=('stringy',), kwargs={'seconds': 5})
my_thread.start()
returned = my_thread.join(timeout=2)
# (returned is None) # because join() timed out before giveMe() finished

# TEST 4
my_thread = ThreadWithReturn(target=giveMe, args=(None,), kwargs={'seconds': 5})
my_thread.start()
returned = my_thread.join(timeout=random.randint(1, 10))

Can you identify the corner-case that we may possibly encounter with TEST 4?

The problem is that we expect giveMe() to return None (see TEST 2), but we also expect join() to return None if it times out.

returned is None means either:

(1) that's what giveMe() returned, or

(2) join() timed out

This example is trivial since we know that giveMe() will always return None. But in real-world instance (where the target may legitimately return None or something else) we'd want to explicitly check for what happened.

Below is how to address this corner-case:

# TEST 4
my_thread = ThreadWithReturn(target=giveMe, args=(None,), kwargs={'seconds': 5})
my_thread.start()
returned = my_thread.join(timeout=random.randint(1, 10))

if my_thread.isAlive():
    # returned is None because join() timed out
    # this also means that giveMe() is still running in the background
    pass
    # handle this based on your app's logic
else:
    # join() is finished, and so is giveMe()
    # BUT we could also be in a race condition, so we need to update returned, just in case
    returned = my_thread.join()
  • Do you know the _Thread_target equivalent for Python3? That attribute doesn't exist in Python3. – GreySage Jun 24 '16 at 19:20
  • I looked in the threading.py file, it turns out it is _target (other attributes are similarly named). – GreySage Jun 24 '16 at 20:16
  • You could avoid accessing the private variables of the thread class, if you save the target, args, and kwargs arguments to init as member variables in your class. – Tolli Aug 18 '16 at 22:48
  • @GreySage See my answer, I ported this block to python3 below – GuySoft Oct 31 '16 at 14:32
  • @GreySage answer now supports py2 and py3 – user2426679 Jul 21 at 3:50

My solution to the problem is to wrap the function and thread in a class. Does not require using pools,queues, or c type variable passing. It is also non blocking. You check status instead. See example of how to use it at end of code.

import threading

class ThreadWorker():
    '''
    The basic idea is given a function create an object.
    The object can then run the function in a thread.
    It provides a wrapper to start it,check its status,and get data out the function.
    '''
    def __init__(self,func):
        self.thread = None
        self.data = None
        self.func = self.save_data(func)

    def save_data(self,func):
        '''modify function to save its returned data'''
        def new_func(*args, **kwargs):
            self.data=func(*args, **kwargs)

        return new_func

    def start(self,params):
        self.data = None
        if self.thread is not None:
            if self.thread.isAlive():
                return 'running' #could raise exception here

        #unless thread exists and is alive start or restart it
        self.thread = threading.Thread(target=self.func,args=params)
        self.thread.start()
        return 'started'

    def status(self):
        if self.thread is None:
            return 'not_started'
        else:
            if self.thread.isAlive():
                return 'running'
            else:
                return 'finished'

    def get_results(self):
        if self.thread is None:
            return 'not_started' #could return exception
        else:
            if self.thread.isAlive():
                return 'running'
            else:
                return self.data

def add(x,y):
    return x +y

add_worker = ThreadWorker(add)
print add_worker.start((1,2,))
print add_worker.status()
print add_worker.get_results()
  • how would you handle an exception? let's say the add function was given and int and a str. would all the threads fail or would only one fail? – user1745713 Mar 23 '16 at 17:58

Using Queue :

import threading, queue

def calc_square(num, out_queue1):
  l = []
  for x in num:
    l.append(x*x)
  out_queue1.put(l)


arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
out_queue1=queue.Queue()
t1=threading.Thread(target=calc_square, args=(arr,out_queue1))
t1.start()
t1.join()
print (out_queue1.get())

You can define a mutable above the scope of the threaded function, and add the result to that. (I also modified the code to be python3 compatible)

returns = {}
def foo(bar):
    print('hello {0}'.format(bar))
    returns[bar] = 'foo'

from threading import Thread
t = Thread(target=foo, args=('world!',))
t.start()
t.join()
print(returns)

This returns {'world!': 'foo'}

If you use the function input as the key to your results dict, every unique input is guaranteed to give an entry in the results

You can use Pool as a pool of worker processes as below:

from multiprocessing import Pool


def f1(x, y):
    return x*y


if __name__ == '__main__':
    with Pool(processes=10) as pool:
        result = pool.apply(f1, (2, 3))
        print(result)

Taking into consideration @iman comment on @JakeBiesinger answer I have recomposed it to have various number of threads:

from multiprocessing.pool import ThreadPool

def foo(bar, baz):
    print 'hello {0}'.format(bar)
    return 'foo' + baz

numOfThreads = 3 
results = []

pool = ThreadPool(numOfThreads)

for i in range(0, numOfThreads):
    results.append(pool.apply_async(foo, ('world', 'foo'))) # tuple of args for foo)

# do some other stuff in the main process
# ...
# ...

results = [r.get() for r in results]
print results

pool.close()
pool.join()

Cheers,

Guy.

join always return None, i think you should subclass Thread to handle return codes and so.

I'm using this wrapper, which comfortably turns any function for running in a Thread - taking care of its return value or exception. It doesn't add Queue overhead.

def threading_func(f):
    """Decorator for running a function in a thread and handling its return
    value or exception"""
    def start(*args, **kw):
        def run():
            try:
                th.ret = f(*args, **kw)
            except:
                th.exc = sys.exc_info()
        def get(timeout=None):
            th.join(timeout)
            if th.exc:
                raise th.exc[0], th.exc[1], th.exc[2] # py2
                ##raise th.exc[1] #py3                
            return th.ret
        th = threading.Thread(None, run)
        th.exc = None
        th.get = get
        th.start()
        return th
    return start

Usage Examples

def f(x):
    return 2.5 * x
th = threading_func(f)(4)
print("still running?:", th.is_alive())
print("result:", th.get(timeout=1.0))

@threading_func
def th_mul(a, b):
    return a * b
th = th_mul("text", 2.5)

try:
    print(th.get())
except TypeError:
    print("exception thrown ok.")

Notes on threading module

Comfortable return value & exception handling of a threaded function is a frequent "Pythonic" need and should indeed already be offered by the threading module - possibly directly in the standard Thread class. ThreadPool has way too much overhead for simple tasks - 3 managing threads, lots of bureaucracy. Unfortunately Thread's layout was copied from Java originally - which you see e.g. from the still useless 1st (!) constructor parameter group.

  • the first constructor is not useless, its reserved there for future implementation.. from python parallel programming cookbook – vijay shanker Oct 29 '16 at 21:23

As mentioned multiprocessing pool is much slower than basic threading. Using queues as proposeded in some answers here is a very effective alternative. I have use it with dictionaries in order to be able run a lot of small threads and recuperate multiple answers by combining them with dictionaries:

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import threading
# use Queue for python2
import queue
import random

LETTERS = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'
LETTERS = [ x for x in LETTERS ]

NUMBERS = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

def randoms(k, q):
    result = dict()
    result['letter'] = random.choice(LETTERS)
    result['number'] = random.choice(NUMBERS)
    q.put({k: result})

threads = list()
q = queue.Queue()
results = dict()

for name in ('alpha', 'oscar', 'yankee',):
    threads.append( threading.Thread(target=randoms, args=(name, q)) )
    threads[-1].start()
_ = [ t.join() for t in threads ]
while not q.empty():
    results.update(q.get())

print(results)

Define your target to
1) take an argument q
2) replace any statements return foo with q.put(foo); return

so a function

def func(a):
    ans = a * a
    return ans

would become

def func(a, q):
    ans = a * a
    q.put(ans)
    return

and then you would proceed as such

from Queue import Queue
from threading import Thread

ans_q = Queue()
arg_tups = [(i, ans_q) for i in xrange(10)]

threads = [Thread(target=func, args=arg_tup) for arg_tup in arg_tups]
_ = [t.start() for t in threads]
_ = [t.join() for t in threads]
results = [q.get() for _ in xrange(len(threads))]

And you can use function decorators/wrappers to make it so you can use your existing functions as target without modifying them, but follow this basic scheme.

One usual solution is to wrap your function foo with a decorator like

result = queue.Queue()

def task_wrapper(*args):
    result.put(target(*args))

Then the whole code may looks like that

result = queue.Queue()

def task_wrapper(*args):
    result.put(target(*args))

threads = [threading.Thread(target=task_wrapper, args=args) for args in args_list]

for t in threads:
    t.start()
    while(True):
        if(len(threading.enumerate()) < max_num):
            break
for t in threads:
    t.join()
return result

Note

One important issue is that the return values may be unorderred. (In fact, the return value is not necessarily saved to the queue, since you can choose arbitrary thread-safe data structure )

Why don't just use global variable?

import threading


class myThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, ind, lock):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.ind = ind
        self.lock = lock

    def run(self):
        global results
        with self.lock:
            results.append(self.ind)



results = []
lock = threading.Lock()
threads = [myThread(x, lock) for x in range(1, 4)]
for t in threads:
    t.start()
for t in threads:
    t.join()
print(results)

Very simple way to get this done for such dummies like me:

import queue
import threading

# creating queue instance
q = queue.Queue()

# creating threading class
class AnyThread():
    def __init__ (self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)

    def run(self):
        # in this class and function we will put our test target function
        test()

t = AnyThread()

# having our test target function
def test():
    # do something in this function:
    result = 3 + 2
    # and put result to a queue instance
    q.put(result)

for i in range(3): #calling our threading fucntion 3 times (just for example)
    t.run()
    output = q.get() # here we get output from queue instance
    print(output)

>>> 5
>>> 5
>>> 5

main thing here - is queue module. We create queue.Queue() instance and include it in our function. We feed it with our result which later we get beyond the thread.

Please see one more example with arguments passed to our test function:

import queue
import threading

# creating queue instance
q = queue.Queue()

# creating threading class
class AnyThread():
    def __init__ (self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)

    def run(self, a, b):
        # in this class and function we will put our execution test function
        test(a, b)

t = AnyThread()

# having our test target function
def test(a, b):
    # do something in this function:
    result = a + b
    # and put result to a queue instance
    q.put(result)

for i in range(3): #calling our threading fucntion 3 times (just for example)
    t.run(3+i, 2+i)
    output = q.get() # here we get output from queue instance
    print(output)

>>> 5
>>> 7
>>> 9

GuySoft's idea is great, but I think the object does not necessarily have to inherit from Thread and start() could be removed from interface:

from threading import Thread
import queue
class ThreadWithReturnValue(object):
    def __init__(self, target=None, args=(), **kwargs):
        self._que = queue.Queue()
        self._t = Thread(target=lambda q,arg1,kwargs1: q.put(target(*arg1, **kwargs1)) ,
                args=(self._que, args, kwargs), )
        self._t.start()

    def join(self):
        self._t.join()
        return self._que.get()


def foo(bar):
    print('hello {0}'.format(bar))
    return "foo"

twrv = ThreadWithReturnValue(target=foo, args=('world!',))

print(twrv.join())   # prints foo

Kindall's answer in Python3

class ThreadWithReturnValue(Thread):
    def __init__(self, group=None, target=None, name=None,
                 args=(), kwargs={}, *, daemon=None):
        Thread.__init__(self, group, target, name, args, kwargs, daemon)
        self._return = None 

    def run(self):
        try:
            if self._target:
                self._return = self._target(*self._args, **self._kwargs)
        finally:
            del self._target, self._args, self._kwargs 

    def join(self,timeout=None):
        Thread.join(self,timeout)
        return self._return

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