7

I need to call a non static member function from a static member function of the same class. The static function is a callback. It can receive only void as data, though which i pass a char*. So i cannot directly provide the class instance to the callback. I can pass a structure instead of char to the callback function. Can anyone give eg code to use the non static member function in a static member function . and use the structure in the static member function to use the instance of the class to call the non static member function?

4 Answers 4

7

Normally such a callback would look like this:

void Callback( void* data)
{
    CMyClass *myClassInstance = static_cast<CMyClass *>(data);
    myClassInstance->MyInstanceMethod();
}

Of course, you need to make sure, data points to an instance of your class. E.g.

CMyClass* data = new CMyClass();
FunctionCallingMyCallback( data, &Callback);
delete data;

Now, if I understand you correctly, you need to also pass a char*. You can either wrap both in a struct and unwrap it in the callback like so:

MyStruct* data = new MyStruct();
data->PtrToMyClass = new CMyClass();
data->MyCharPtr = "test";
FunctionCallingMyCallback( data, &Callback);
delete data->PtrToMyClass;
delete data;


void Callback( void* data)
{
    MyStruct *myStructInstance = static_cast<MyStruct *>(data);
    CMyClass *myClassInstance = myStructInstance->PtrToMyClass;
    char * myData = myStructInstance->MyCharPtr;
    myClassInstance->MyInstanceMethod(myData);
}

or, if you can modify the definition of CMyClass, put all the necessary data in class members, so that you can use a callback as in the first example.

2
  • Good answer - +1 - but you shouldn't use c-style casts IMHO.
    – sje397
    Aug 1, 2011 at 7:07
  • thanks Henrick it worked. I tried the same thing before, except that i dint create a pointer for the struct. Aug 1, 2011 at 11:18
3

If your instance is a singleton (usually implemented using a private or protected constructor and a static pointer to itself) you can do e.g.:

class MyClass {
private:
  MyClass():myInstance(0) {}

  MyClass *myInstance;

  void callback();
public:
  ~MyClass() {}

  static MyClass *getInstance();

  static void myCallback();    
};

MyClass *MyClass::getInstance() {
  if(!myInstance) {
    myInstance = new MyClass;
  }
  return myInsance;
}    

void MyClass::callback() {
 // non-static callback
}

void MyClass::myCallback() {
  getInstance()->callback();
}

If you don't use a singleton but you can pass the instance cast to a void * then you can do this instead:

void MyClass::myCallback(void *data) {
  MyClass *instance = static_cast<MyClass *>(data);
  instance->callback();
}
4
  • It seams that the getInstance is usefull in order to enter in the name space of the class. Is that right? Is that the only purpose?
    – Jonathan
    Jul 29, 2015 at 14:13
  • @Jonathan The getInstance method in combination with the private/protected constructor allows you to limit access to the single instance.
    – sje397
    Jul 31, 2015 at 11:11
  • You could add to your first example different static callbacks "myCallback<1-4>" calling the same method MyClass::callback with a const parameter. Defining "myCallback<1-4>" with a XMacro would be nice.
    – Jonathan
    Nov 23, 2016 at 14:17
  • Don't you get an "Invalid use of member 'myInstance' in static member function' getInstance() error?
    – Mich
    Mar 13, 2020 at 23:03
0

This is the only way :

#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>

struct A;
A *oneObj = NULL;


struct A
{
  A(){
    oneObj=this;
  }
  ~A(){
    oneObj=NULL;
  }
  void foo()
  {
  }

  static void boo()
  {
    assert( NULL != oneObj );
    oneObj->foo();
  }
};

int main()
{
  A onlyOne;
  A::boo();
}
0
0

I need to call a non static member function from a static member function of the same class. The static function is a callback. It can receive only void as data, though which i pass a char*.

This shows that present design is flawed or inproper. IMHO, you should rather think of changing the design. Just imagine if you somehow get the things working but what about the maintainability an readability of the code.

I would suggest that you should change your callback function to different signature and made according changes.

class A {
//...
  static void CallBack (A *pObj)
  {
    // logic
  }
};

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