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I am using Unreal and ran into some weird errors. I eventually found that simply renaming my function parameters fixed the problem. Here is the full header and class. The problem is the InitCard function:



#pragma once

#include "CoreMinimal.h"
#include "GameFramework/Actor.h"
#include "Components/StaticMeshComponent.h"
#include "Playing_Card.generated.h"

UCLASS()
class BLACKJACK_API APlaying_Card : public AActor
{
    GENERATED_BODY()

    
public: 
    enum Suit { HEARTS = 0, DIAMONDS = 1, CLUBS = 2, SPADES = 3, UNASSIGNED = 4 };
    Suit suit = Suit::UNASSIGNED;

    // Sets default values for this actor's properties
    APlaying_Card();

    int rank;
    int value;

    void InitCard(int rank, Suit suit);
    
    FString faceStr = "";

    UPROPERTY(VisibleAnywhere, BlueprintReadWrite)
    UStaticMeshComponent* mesh;


protected:
    // Called when the game starts or when spawned
    virtual void BeginPlay() override;

public: 
    // Called every frame
    virtual void Tick(float DeltaTime) override;

};

Playing_Card.cpp:




#include "Playing_Card.h"


int rank = 0;
int value = 0;

// Sets default values
APlaying_Card::APlaying_Card()
{
    // Set this actor to call Tick() every frame.  You can turn this off to improve performance if you don't need it.
    PrimaryActorTick.bCanEverTick = true;

    mesh = CreateDefaultSubobject<UStaticMeshComponent>(TEXT("mesh"));

    RootComponent = mesh;

    mesh->SetScalarParameterValueOnMaterials(TEXT("card_index"), 4);    
}



void APlaying_Card::InitCard(int rank, Suit suit)
{
    this->rank = rank;
    this->suit = suit;

    if (rank == 1)
    {
        value = rank; //todo: find a way to make Ace 1 or 11.
        faceStr = "Ace";
    }
    else if (rank <= 10)
    {
        value = rank;
        faceStr = FString::FromInt(rank);
    }
    else if (rank == 11)
    {
        value = 10;
        faceStr = "Jack";
    }
    else if (rank == 12)
    {
        value = 10;
        faceStr = "Queen";
    }
    else if (rank == 13)
    {
        value = 10;
        faceStr = "King";
    }

}

// Called when the game starts or when spawned
void APlaying_Card::BeginPlay()
{
    Super::BeginPlay();
    
}

// Called every frame
void APlaying_Card::Tick(float DeltaTime)
{
    Super::Tick(DeltaTime);

}

and this gives the error: error C4458: declaration of 'rank' hides class member

However, if I change the function parameter names (function posted below) the code compiles without errors.

    /// It works! Just by changing parameter names (note: I still use this->rank)
void APlaying_Card::InitCard(int cardRank, Suit cardSuit)
{
    this->rank = cardRank;
    this->suit = cardSuit;

    if (rank == 1)
    {
        value = rank; //todo: find a way to make Ace 1 or 11.
        faceStr = "Ace";
    }
    else if (rank <= 10)
    {
        value = rank;
        faceStr = FString::FromInt(rank);
    }
    else if (rank == 11)
    {
        value = 10;
        faceStr = "Jack";
    }
    else if (rank == 12)
    {
        value = 10;
        faceStr = "Queen";
    }
    else if (rank == 13)
    {
        value = 10;
        faceStr = "King";
    }

}

What is causing the error when I use the names in my first attempt?

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  • I don't think that should be a hard error. It's a stupid thing to do most of the time, in my opinion, but it's 100% legal. Aug 28, 2021 at 0:08
  • 2
    Function parameters are variables. Why would they be different?
    – jamesdlin
    Aug 28, 2021 at 0:08
  • I also see a rank in the global namespace. This is really going to mess up people reading your code. Maybe three layers of rank is messing up the compiler, too. Aug 28, 2021 at 0:10
  • is the rank in global namespace? that might be it. I am still learning. I thought since I declared rank inside the class it wasn't global.
    – DaveGold
    Aug 28, 2021 at 0:36
  • ah i see. Is the bit in the Cpp file that is global. Perhaps this is what caused the problems. I will have to do some more learning how to declare variables properly in c++
    – DaveGold
    Aug 28, 2021 at 0:40

2 Answers 2

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In the original code, you have global variables rank/suit, class members rank/suit, and parameters rank/suit all within scope in InitCard(). So which ones do you expect the compiler to use on the right-hand of the statements this->rank = rank; this->suit = suit;? It is not going to be the class members, it will be the function parameters since they are in local scope. And the compiler warns you about that, since they have the same names as the class members.

Removing the global variables, and renaming the parameters, avoids any ambiguity. So would initializing the class in its constructor using its member initialization list, not a separate Init method:

UCLASS()
class BLACKJACK_API APlaying_Card : public AActor
{
...
public: 
    ...
    APlaying_Card(int rank, Suit suit);
    ...
};
APlaying_Card::APlaying_Card(int rank, Suit suit) :
    rank(rank), suit(suit) // <-- no ambiguity here! 
{
    ...

    if (rank == 1)
    {
        value = rank; //todo: find a way to make Ace 1 or 11.
        faceStr = "Ace";
    }
    else if (rank <= 10)
    {
        value = rank;
        faceStr = FString::FromInt(rank);
    }
    else if (rank == 11)
    {
        value = 10;
        faceStr = "Jack";
    }
    else if (rank == 12)
    {
        value = 10;
        faceStr = "Queen";
    }
    else if (rank == 13)
    {
        value = 10;
        faceStr = "King";
    }
}
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  • Much thanks for the clarification of this. Somehow I got it in my head that putting parameters in the constructors with Unreal was causing it a problem (it was probably due to my code being wrong somewhere else again :S )
    – DaveGold
    Aug 28, 2021 at 10:36
  • How would I use "SpawnActor" to spawn the Card Actor with its parameters in the constructor, please? (Like before I had something like world::SpawnActor<APlaying_Card>(); (I'm not at home so cannot check the exact syntax but i think thats what I had
    – DaveGold
    Aug 28, 2021 at 10:37
  • Also one last question. In your code APlaying_Card::APlaying_Card(int rank, Suit suit) : rank(rank), suit(suit) This was the part I didn't realise I could do. (What is this called/where can I find more info about the rank(rank) part). ...You saved me much brainache by typing this answer. Big thanks
    – DaveGold
    Aug 28, 2021 at 11:21
  • @DaveGold sorry I can't answer your question about spawning actors with constructor parameters. If that doesn't work, then so be it, just go back to using an init method, but be aware of naming conflicts. As for the constructor, did you visit the link I posted in my answer? Aug 28, 2021 at 17:19
  • Thanks Remy. Your answer helped me learn more about C++ which is my ultimate goal anyway. For the record I have been speaking to someone at Unreal Forum forums.unrealengine.com/t/… and apparently parameters in the constructor is a bad idea.
    – DaveGold
    Aug 28, 2021 at 17:47
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It is not because of the parameter is behaves like a variable declaration (though, they differs only by the way of initialization), but because of just name reusing (it could be a name of not only an already existing variable).

To name the parameters as you did initially is totally correct in regard to C++ language, but error-prone in regard to code design since it is easy enough to misuse the name and so get a result different from intended.

Initially, C4458 is a warning by which compiler would notify you that you do such error-prone thing, but not an error - so normally it would not prevent successful compiling a program; but the crux of the matter is that you compiler is treating warnings as errors, it must happen according to corresponded compiler setting; you can turn this off, if required.

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