2

sorry for a seemingly stupid question. I was testing the computational efficiency when replacing for-loop operations on matrices with intrinsic functions. When I check the matrices product results of the two methods, it confused me that the two outputs were not the same. Here is the simplified code I used

program matmultest
    integer,parameter::nx=64,ny=32,nz=16
    real*8::mat1(nx,ny),mat2(ny,nz)
    real*8::result1(nx,nz),result2(nx,nz),diff(nx,nz)
    real*8::localsum
    integer::i,j,m
    do i=1,ny
        do j=1,nx
            mat1(j,i)=dble(j)/7d0+2.65d0*dble(i)
        enddo
    enddo
    do i=1,nz
        do j=1,ny
            mat2(j,i)=5d0*dble(j)-dble(i)*0.45d0
        enddo
    enddo
    do j=1,nz
        do i=1,nx
            localsum=0d0
            do m=1,ny
                localsum=localsum+mat1(i,m)*mat2(m,j)
            enddo
            result1(i,j)=localsum
        enddo
    enddo
    result2=matmul(mat1,mat2)
    diff=result2-result1
    print*,sum(abs(diff)),maxval(diff)
end program matmultest

And the result gives

   1.6705598682165146E-008   5.8207660913467407E-011

The difference is non-zero for real8 but zero when I tested for integer later. I wonder if it is because of my code's faults somewhere or the numerical accuracy of MATMUL() is single precision?

And the compiler I am using is GNU Fortran (Ubuntu 9.3.0-17ubuntu1~20.04) 9.3.0

Thanks!

4
  • Why do you expect the results to be equal? Aug 28, 2021 at 9:41
  • @francescalus Thanks for commenting. The two results are the products of the same matrices calculated by different codes, so I think the result should be the same, if my code is not wrong.
    – himcraft
    Aug 28, 2021 at 9:50
  • 3
    These calculations use floating point, where even summing the same numbers in a different order can give different results, so it doesn't follow that two different ways of calculating with matrices should give the same answer. The differences that you show are essentially zero in floating-point world. For us to point you in the right direction could you give us some idea of your background with numerical computing? (It's not helpful if we try to give you material you don't have the experience or knowledge to easily understand.) Aug 28, 2021 at 10:08
  • @francescalus I just finished my first year as a postgraduate student in physics. I have learned Fortran for a year but, ashamedly, barely paid attention to such behaviors of floating-point numbers. Thanks a lot for your explanation, this solved my question. I should read more about floating-point characteristics.
    – himcraft
    Aug 28, 2021 at 13:35

2 Answers 2

5

francescalus explained that reordering of operations causes these differences. Let's try to find out how it actually happened.

A few words about matrix product

Consider matrices A(n,p), B(p,q), C(n,q) and C = A*B.

The naive approach, a variant of which you used, involves the following nested loops:

c = 0
do i = 1, n
    do j = 1, p
        do k = 1, q
            c(i, j) = c(i, j) + a(i, k) * b(k, j)
        end do
    end do
end do

These loops can be executed in any of 6 orders, depending on the variable that you choose at each level. In the example above, the loop is named "ijk", and the other variants "ikj", "jik", etc. are all correct.

There is a speed difference, due to the memory cache: when the inner loop runs across contiguous memory elements, the loop is faster. That's the jki or kji cases.

Indeed, since Fortran matrices are stored in column major order, if the innermost loop runs on i, in the instruction c(i, j) = c(i, j) + a(i, k) * c(k, j), the value c(k, j) is constant, and the operation is equivalent to v(i) = v(i) + x * u(i), where the elements of vectors v and u are contiguous.

However, regarding the order of operations, there shouldn't be a difference: you can check for yourself that all elements of C are computed in the same order. At least at the "higher level": the compiler might optimize things differently, and it's where it becomes really interesting.

What about MATMUL? I believe it's usually a naive matrix product, based on the nested loops above, say a jki loop.

There are other ways to multiply matrices, that involve the Strassen algorithm to improve the algorithm complexity or blocking (i.e. computed products of submatrices) to improve cache use. Other methods that could change the result are OpenMP (i.e. multithread), or using FMA instructions. But here we are not going to delve into these methods. It's really only about the nested loops. If you are interested, there are many resources online, check this.

A few words about optimization

Three remarks first:

  • On a processor without SIMD instructions, you would get the same result as MATMUL (i.e. you would print zero in the end).
  • If you had implemented the loops as above, you would also get the same result. There is a tiny but significant difference in your code.
  • If you had implemented the loops as a subroutine, you would also get the same result. Here I suspect the compiler optimizer is doing some reordering, as I can't reproduce your "accumulator" code with a subroutine, at least with Intel Fortran.

Here is your implementation:

do i = 1, n
    do j = 1, p
        s = 0
        do k = 1, q
            s = s + a(i, k) * b(k, j)
        end do
        c(i, j) = s
    end do
end do

It's also correct of course. Here, you are using an accumulator, and at the end of the innermost loop, the value of the accumulator is written in the matrix C.

Optimization is typically relevant on the innermost loop mainly. For our purpose, two "basic" instructions in the innermost loop are relevant, if we get rid of all other details:

  • v(i) = v(i) + x*u(i) (the jki loop)
  • s = s + x(k)*y(k) (the accumulator loop where y is contiguous in memory, but not x)

The first is usually called a "daxpy" (from the name of a BLAS routine), for "A X Plus Y", the "D" meaning double precision. The second one is just an accumulator.

On an old sequential processor, there is not much to be done to optimize. On a modern processor with SIMD, registers can hold several values, and computations can be done on all of them at once, in parallel. For instance, on x86, an XMM register (from SSE instruction set) can hold two double precision floating-point numbers. A YMM register (from AVX2) can hold four numbers, and a ZMM register (AVX512, found on Xeon) can hold eight numbers.

For instance, on YMM the innermost loop will be "unrolled" to deal with four vector elements at a time (or even more if using several registers).

Here is what the basic loop block is then roughly doing:

daxpy case:

  • Read 4 numbers from u into register YMM1
  • Read 4 numbers from v into register YMM2
  • x is constant and is kept in another register
  • Multiply in parallel x with YMM1, add in parallel to YMM2, put the result in YMM2
  • Write back the result to corresponding elements of v

The read/write part is faster if the elements are contiguous in memory, but if they are not it's still worth doing this in parallel.

Note that here, we haven't changed the execution order of additions of the high level Fortran loop.

accumulator case

For the parallelism to be useful, there will be a trick: accumulate four values in parallel in a YMM register, and then add the four accumulated values.

The basic loop block is thus doing this:

  • The accumulator is kept in YMM3 (four numbers)
  • Read 4 numbers from X into register YMM1
  • Read 4 numbers from Y into register YMM2
  • Multiply in parallel YMM1 with YMM2, add in parallel to YMM3

At the end of the innermost loop, add the four components of the accumulator, and write this back as the matrix element.

It's like if we had computed:

  • s1 = x(1)*y(1) + x(5)*y(5) + ... + x(29)*y(29)
  • s2 = x(2)*y(2) + x(6)*y(6) + ... + x(30)*y(30)
  • s3 = x(3)*y(3) + x(7)*y(7) + ... + x(31)*y(31)
  • s4 = x(4)*y(4) + x(8)*y(8) + ... + x(32)*y(32)

And then the matrix element written is c(i,j) = s1+s2+s3+s4.

Here the order of additions has changed! And then, since the order is different, the result is very likely different.

2

I can replicate the results when using fast math (I have Intel Fortran), and when I compile with the default /fp:fast I get the following max error and speed

!            Error            Loops           Matmul
!      0.58208E-10         107526.9         140056.0        FAST

The error is just maxval(abs(diff)) speed measured is in # of matrix operations per second.

But when I compile with /fp:strict then I get no error, but a slowdown with the loops

!            Error            Loops           Matmul
!           0.0000          43140.6         141844.0        STRICT

I see a -60% slowdown in the loops with strict floating-point handling, but surprisingly no slowdown with the matmul() function.


Source Code for completeness

program Console1
use iso_fortran_env
implicit none
integer,parameter :: nr = 100000
integer,parameter::nx=64,ny=32,nz=16
real(real64)::mat1(nx,ny),mat2(ny,nz)
real(real64)::result1(nx,nz),result2(nx,nz),diff(nx,nz)
real(real64)::localsum
integer::i,j,r
integer(int64) :: tic, toc, rate
real(real64) :: dt1, dt2

    do i=1,ny
        do j=1,nx
            mat1(j,i)=dble(j)/7d0+2.65d0*dble(i)
        enddo
    enddo
    do i=1,nz
        do j=1,ny
            mat2(j,i)=5d0*dble(j)-dble(i)*0.45d0
        enddo
    enddo

    call SYSTEM_CLOCK(tic,rate)
    do r=1, nr
        result1=mymatmul(mat1,mat2)
    end do
    call SYSTEM_CLOCK(toc,rate)
    dt1 = dble(toc-tic)/rate
    
    call SYSTEM_CLOCK(tic,rate)
    do r=1, nr
        result2=matmul(mat1,mat2)
    end do
    call SYSTEM_CLOCK(toc,rate)
    dt2 = dble(toc-tic)/rate
    
    diff=result2-result1
    print ('(1x,a16,1x,a16,1x,a16)'), "Error", "Loops", "Matmul"
    print ('(1x,g16.5,1x,f16.1,1x,f16.1)'), maxval(abs(diff)), nr/dt1, nr/dt2
    
    
    !            Error            Loops           Matmul
    !      0.58208E-10         107526.9         140056.0        FAST
    !           0.0000          43140.6         141844.0        STRICT
    !
contains

pure function mymatmul(a,b) result(c)
real(real64), intent(in) :: a(:,:), b(:,:)
real(real64) :: c(size(a,1), size(b,2))
integer :: i,j,k
real(real64) :: sum

    do j=1, size(c,2)
        do i=1, size(c,1)
            sum = 0d0
            do k=1, size(a,2)
                sum = sum + a(i,k)*b(k,j)
            end do
            c(i,j) = sum
        end do
    end do    
end function


end program Console1

Always compiled as Release-x64 and not Debug.

1
  • It comes from the /fp:precise flag, that is implied by /fp:strict. When enabled, the manual says: "Disable optimizations that are not value-safe on floating point data and rounds intermediate results to source-defined precision". By checking the assembly, you will see that only scalar SSE instructions are then used, not the parallel ones. With the "jki" loop, however, the compiler is still able to use them. Aug 29, 2021 at 8:07

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