0

Lets say I have a generic wrapper class for an object called worker with many methods:

template<typename T>
class Wrapper
{
private:
    T m_Worker;

public:
    void DoSomeWork1() { m_Worker.Work1(); }
    void DoSomeWork2() { m_Worker.Work2(); }
    // ...
};

Now I can simply use my Wrapper class by creating an object and calling a member:

Wrapper<MyWorker> wrap;
wrap.DoSomeWork1();

But I also need to have the ability to use a "static" wrapper class (util class) besides the "local" wrapper class, to be able to make calls without creating a local object first:

StaticWrapper<MyWorker>::DoSomeWork1();

StaticWrapper<T> would be the same as Wrapper<T>, but implemented statically:

template<typename T>
class StaticWrapper
{
private:
    static T& Get()
    {
        static T worker;
        return worker;
    }

public:
    static void DoSomeWork1(); { Get().Work1(); }
    static void DoSomeWork2(); { Get().Work1(); }
    // ...
};

Question

The above solution using two different classes works, but I have to write the same code twice, once with the static keyword and once without it.

Is there any method or design pattern to avoid writing the same code twice, that is having a static and non static interface inside one class called Wrapper and then decide which one to use (static or not) during compile time when creating / using the Wrapper? Essentially something like setting the storage specifier as a template argument:

// Fantasy code
// To use a local Wrapper
Wrapper<Locally, MyWorker> localWrap;

// To use a static Wrapper
Wrapper<Statically, MyWorker>::DoSomeWork1();

Also Note: The DoSomeWork1(), DoSomeWork2(), ... methods have more in code in them than just calling a method from MyWorker. So directly using a static (or not) MyWorker is not an option.

3

(You can find the original answer and approach bellow)

Sergey's answer has the most merit, and can be expanded to what you are after. Use the Wrapper itself as a static member and delegate to it. To get the syntax you are after, you simply use a "dummy policy" argument and some template specialization to structure the code.

struct MemberData;
struct StaticData;

template<typename T, typename StoragePolicy = MemberData>
class Wrapper;

template<typename T>
class Wrapper<T, MemberData>
{
private:
    T m_Worker;

public:
    void DoSomeWork1() { m_Worker.Work1(); }
    void DoSomeWork2() { m_Worker.Work2(); }
    // ...
};

template<typename T>
class Wrapper<T, StaticData>
{
private:
    static auto& get() {
        static Wrapper<T, MemberData> obj;
        return obj;
    }

public:
    static void DoSomeWork1() { get().DoSomeWork1(); }
    static void DoSomeWork2() { get().DoSomeWork2(); }
    // ...
};

// ... 

int main(int, char **)
{
    //Wrapper<MyWorker>::DoSomeWork1(); //error
    Wrapper<MyWorker> wrap;
    wrap.DoSomeWork1();

    Wrapper<MyWorker, StaticData>::DoSomeWork1();
}

All in all, this is far simpler, and avoids duplication of the implementation rather nicely. Still a bit of boilerplate to get your equivalent set of members.


You can get exactly what you want with some restructuring and policy based design. But the amount of boiler-plate may be not worth it.

We can abstract the storage of the variable (and its) associated member functions into a policy (in this case, represented as a template template-parameter, but it could be a type parameter). Then Wrapper exposes the members of the policy, and provides that implementation (as static members that accept data to operate on).

template<class Worker, template<class> class Storage>
class Wrapper;

template<class Worker>
class MemberData {
  Worker m_Worker;
protected:
  void DoSomeWork1() { Wrapper<Worker, ::MemberData>::DoSomeWork1Impl(m_Worker); }
  void DoSomeWork2() { Wrapper<Worker, ::MemberData>::DoSomeWork2Impl(m_Worker); }
};

template<class Worker>
class StaticData {
  static auto& get() {
    static Worker worker;
    return worker;
  }
protected:
  static void DoSomeWork1() { Wrapper<Worker, ::StaticData>::DoSomeWork1Impl(get()); }
  static void DoSomeWork2() { Wrapper<Worker, ::StaticData>::DoSomeWork2Impl(get()); }
};

template<class Worker, template<class> class Storage = MemberData>
class Wrapper : private Storage<Worker> {
    friend class Storage<Worker>;
    static void DoSomeWork1Impl(Worker&) { /*...*/ }
    static void DoSomeWork2Impl(Worker&) { /*...*/ }
public:
    using Storage<Worker>::DoSomeWork1;
    using Storage<Worker>::DoSomeWork2;
};

int main(int, char **)
{
    //Wrapper<int>::DoSomeWork1(); //error
    Wrapper<int> wrap;
    wrap.DoSomeWork1();
    
    Wrapper<int, StaticData>::DoSomeWork1();
}

Here it is live

As you can gauge from the complexity of this implementation for a simple example, "conditionally static" is very hard to come by. And if DoSomeWork1Impl depend on data in Wrapper, well it will become more complex still.

5
  • 1
    First: Thanks for the reply, I don't get why this implementation got downvoted. Especially in my case, my class has a few hundred lines of code with small methods, so 20 lines of "overhead" is much better than 600 LOC of duplication. I'm still trying to fully understand everything happening in the sample and which of the suggested solutions fits best in my case. So the accepted answer will take a few days.
    – Marc
    Sep 1 at 4:27
  • Do you have an idea why this implementation would be bad? Also it would be a great help if you could explain your last sentence about DoSomeWork1Impl depending on Wrapper-Data a bit further. This is the part im currently trying to get my head around. Do you basically mean, if I would have another member variable inside Wrapper that I need to access inside the DoSomeWorkNImpl methods, I would also need a storage-policy implementation (static/not static) for each of those other member vars? Because I need to access other member in my case, so what preferred solution would they be?
    – Marc
    Sep 1 at 4:35
  • @Marc - I was pointing out that sharing state in this approach is a pain in the neck. Since DoSomeWork1Impl have to be static, it becomes harder to pass state around. But I think doing a variant of what Sergey Kipnis suggests, along with an extra "policy" argument can work. Sep 1 at 11:41
  • Thanks for the new sample based on Sergey's code. I think that is the best solution. However I think you made a mistake in the get() function of the statically-specialized Wrapper class. Should be static function and instance.
    – Marc
    Sep 2 at 3:30
  • @Marc - Indeed. Fixed now Sep 2 at 13:27
3

Let's break things down at a slightly lower level:

template<typename T>
class NonStaticWrapper
{
private:
    T m_Worker;

public:
    T &Get() { return m_worker; }
};

then just take the wrapper that you already wrote:

template<typename T>
class StaticWrapper
{
private:
    static T& Get()
    {
        static T worker;
        return worker;
    }
};

And now you can implement your wrapper simply as follows:


template<typename T>
class Wrapper : private T
{
public:
    void DoSomeWork1() { this->Get().Work1(); }
    void DoSomeWork2() { this->Get().Work2(); }
    // ...
};

And then instantiate either Wrapper<NonStaticWrapper<T>> or Wrapper<StaticWrapper<T>>(1).

You may or may not choose to use public or private inheritance, for the Wrapper. And some additional work might be needed with construction(2). But those are just minor details.

(1) this->Get() or T::Get() would be generally equivalent here, and is a matter of preference.

(2) you would probably need to use something like

Wrapper<StaticWrapper<T>>{}.DoSomeWork1();

to invoke the static versions.

1
  • This solution is also nice. Having to use initializer-list brackets for static calls wouldn't be a big problem for me. However the calls to the static Wrapper should be fast, and your version creates a vocal object first for every static call.
    – Marc
    Sep 2 at 4:27
2

You could keep in the static API not T itself but Wrapper.

The resulting class with "static API" may look:

template <typename T>
class StaticWrapper {
private:
    static Wrapper<T>& Get() {
        static Wrapper<T> worker;
        return worker;
    }

public:
    static void DoSomeWork1() { Get().DoSomeWork1(); }
    static void DoSomeWork2() { Get().DoSomeWork2(); }
    // ...
};

Update on question: Alternative and a bit better approach(no separate StaticWrapper class)

template <typename T>
class Wrapper {
private:
    T m_Worker;

public:
    // Standard API to be implemented
    void DoSomeWork1() { m_Worker.Work1(); }
    void DoSomeWork2() { m_Worker.Work2(); }

    // Static API just wraps Standard API
    static void DoSomeWork1_Static() {
        static Wrapper<T> x;
        x.DoSomeWork1();
    }
    static void DoSomeWork2_Static() {
        static Wrapper<T> x;
        x.DoSomeWork2();
    }
};

void call_examples() {
    Wrapper<w1> w1;
    w1.DoSomeWork1();
    Wrapper<w1>::DoSomeWork1_Static();
    Wrapper<w2>::DoSomeWork2_Static();
}
4
  • How would that avoid code duplication? I still have a Wrapper class containing all the code and also the StaticWrapper class, again containing the same methods as Wrapper. And of course there is still the problem of having to use two different classes for static/non static.
    – Marc
    Aug 30 at 12:39
  • 1. You don't duplicate your code, you should implement only Wrapper. StaticWrapper just calls static instance of Wrapper class. Aug 31 at 8:13
  • 2. I have updated the answer with approach without separate static class. Aug 31 at 8:37
  • Thanks for clarification. Also see the edited post from StoryTeller. Your suggestion in combination with StoryTellers policy based design suggestion seems to be the best fit in my case.
    – Marc
    Sep 2 at 3:44

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