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Is there a one liner that shows me the dates where all git lightweight tags where created ?

Something like: git show tags --format=date ?

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    @jleedev: I was looking for a solution for lightweight tags. I'll edit my question accordingly.
    – Dror Cohen
    Aug 1, 2011 at 15:06
  • Also of possible interest for this Q: stackoverflow.com/questions/2021599/…
    – Steen
    Sep 16, 2014 at 7:15
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    There is no date information attached to a lightweight tag. Therefore, the accepted answer is incorrect. The dates in the output of git log --tags --simplify-by-decoration --pretty="format:%ai %d" are the dates of the objects to which the tags point, not the dates when the tags themselves were created.
    – jub0bs
    Nov 17, 2014 at 18:49
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    @Jubobs strictly speaking, you are right: the correct answer is: "It is impossible to do what you want". But that is likely what the OP wanted. Apr 27, 2015 at 6:52

3 Answers 3

372

I found in this link a solution that fits my needs:

git log --tags --simplify-by-decoration --pretty="format:%ai %d"

I've put that command in an alias in my ~/.alias, so now everytime I run gitshowtagbydate I get what I needed.

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    It's worth piping this into sort to get a chronological order, if you're into that sort of thing.
    – cam8001
    Nov 27, 2012 at 10:23
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    git log --date-order --graph --tags --simplify-by-decoration --pretty=format:'%ai %h %d' :-) Apr 11, 2013 at 19:23
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    git log --decorate=full --all --pretty=format:'%h %d %s %cr %ae' --abbrev-commit|grep 'refs/tags'
    – sivann
    Jan 16, 2014 at 15:25
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    There is no date information attached to a lightweight tag. Therefore, this answer is incorrect. The dates in the output of git log --tags --simplify-by-decoration --pretty="format:%ai %d" are the dates of the objects to which the tags point, not the dates when the tags themselves were created.
    – jub0bs
    Nov 17, 2014 at 18:49
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    @Jubobs If your tagging system performs a separate commit, like Maven, or if you write the new tag version manually to a version file, for instance, it won't matter if it's a lightweight tag or an annotated tag. That's because the commit linked to the lightweight tag will contain the current date and committer information, anyway.
    – ingyhere
    Jan 19, 2017 at 2:18
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The git tag -l shows a list of all tags. The --format argument can be used to define a custom output. For example:

git tag -l --format='%(refname)   %(taggerdate)'

Update, based on the comments below:

 git tag -l --sort=-creatordate --format='%(creatordate:short):  %(refname:short)'
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    Pipe delimited, iso 8601 date formatting, sorted with latest on top. git tag -l --format="%(taggerdate:iso8601)|%(refname:short)" | sort -r
    – ingyhere
    Jan 19, 2017 at 4:20
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    taggerdate is not always set; try creatordate.
    – 9000
    Jun 7, 2017 at 15:38
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    @ingyhere version was the thing I was looking for — git tag -l --format="%(creatordate:short)|%(refname:short)" | sort -rref for customising the time stamp
    – revelt
    Jun 8, 2018 at 14:18
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    @revelt git >= 2.0 provides a sort param. Put a minus in to reverse the order. git tag -l --sort=-creatordate --format='%(creatordate:short)|%(refname:short)' Apr 4, 2019 at 13:24
  • According to git-for-each-ref which is how the format flag determines and renders the fields, you can add a * before the fieldname so that you get at the date of the object which the tag points to. --format='%(*creatordate)' although I didn't see any difference when I tried this.
    – Cheruvim
    Jul 17, 2020 at 1:35
1

You cannot

Lightweight (non-annotated) tags do only point to another object (like a commit, which has a date). See the one of the other answers to print these (creatordate).

Annotated tags do carry a date, an author and a message. The one of the other answers to print these (taggerdate).

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