9

I have 4 files all in the same directory: main.rakumod, infix_ops.rakumod, prefix_ops.rakumod and script.raku:

  • main module has a class definition (class A)
  • *_ops modules have some operator routine definitions to write, e.g., $a1 + $a2 in an overloaded way.
  • script.raku tries to instantaniate A object(s) and use those user-defined operators.

Why 3 files not 1? Since class definition might be long and separating overloaded operator definitions in files seemed like a good idea for writing tidier code (easier to manage).

e.g.,

# main.rakumod
class A {
    has $.x is rw;
}
# prefix_ops.rakumod
use lib ".";
use main;

multi prefix:<++>(A:D $obj) {
    ++$obj.x;
    $obj;
}

and similar routines in infix_ops.rakumod. Now, in script.raku, my aim is to import main module only and see the overloaded operators also available:

# script.raku
use lib ".";
use main;

my $a = A.new(x => -1);
++$a;

but it naturally doesn't see ++ multi for A objects because main.rakumod doesn't know the *_ops.rakumod files as it stands. Is there a way I can achieve this? If I use prefix_ops in main.rakumod, it says 'use lib' may not be pre-compiled perhaps because of circular dependentness

3
  • I admit I am a beginner to the language and very confused about use, import, require, need, module etc even after looking documentation multiple times. I don't know what to use when. It may be that it assumes some Perl5 knowledge for these but perlmod is also confusing for me
    – user15750474
    Sep 1, 2021 at 17:22
  • I've got an answer ready, but am working on improving it. Do you want me to publish what I have already or wait a while (maybe a half hour)?
    – raiph
    Sep 1, 2021 at 17:25
  • @raiph however you wish, thank you.
    – user15750474
    Sep 1, 2021 at 17:27

2 Answers 2

3

it says 'use lib' may not be pre-compiled

  • The word "may" is ambiguous. Actually it cannot be precompiled.

  • The message would be better if it said something to the effect of "Don't put use lib in a module."

This has now been fixed per @codesections++'s comment below.

perhaps because of circular dependentness

No. use lib can only be used by the main program file, the one directly run by Rakudo.

Is there a way I can achieve this?

Here's one way.

We introduce a new file that's used by the other packages to eliminate the circularity. So now we have four files (I've rationalized the naming to stick to A or variants of it for the packages that contribute to the type A):

  1. A-sawn.rakumod that's a role or class or similar:

    unit role A-sawn;
    
  2. Other packages that are to be separated out into their own files use the new "sawn" package and does or is it as appropriate:

    use A-sawn;
    
    unit class A-Ops does A-sawn;
    
    multi  prefix:<++>(A-sawn:D $obj) is export { ++($obj.x) }
    multi postfix:<++>(A-sawn:D $obj) is export { ($obj.x)++ }
    
  3. The A.rakumod file for the A type does the same thing. It also uses whatever other packages are to be pulled into the same A namespace; this will import symbols from it according to Raku's standard importing rules. And then relevant symbols are explicitly exported:

    use A-sawn;
    use A-Ops;
    sub EXPORT { Map.new: OUTER:: .grep: /'fix:<'/ }
    
    unit class A does A-sawn;
    has $.x is rw;
    
  4. Finally, with this setup in place, the main program can just use A;:

    use lib '.';
    use A;
    
    my $a = A.new(x => -1);
    say $a++; # A.new(x => -1)
    say ++$a; # A.new(x => 1)
    say ++$a; # A.new(x => 2)
    

The two main things here are:

  • Introducing an (empty) A-sawn package

    This type eliminates circularity using the technique shown in @codesection's answer to Best Way to Resolve Circular Module Loading.

    Raku culture has a fun generic term/meme for techniques that cut through circular problems: "circular saws". So I've used a -sawn suffix of the "sawn" typename as a convention when using this technique.[1]

  • Importing symbols into a package and then re-exporting them

    This is done via sub EXPORT { Map.new: ... }.[2] See the doc for sub EXPORT.

    The Map must contain a list of symbols (Pairs). For this case I've grepped through keys from the OUTER:: pseudopackage that refers to the symbol table of the lexical scope immediately outside the sub EXPORT the OUTER:: appears in. This is of course the lexical scope into which some symbols (for operators) have just been imported by the use Ops; statement. I then grep that symbol table for keys containing fix:<; this will catch all symbol keys with that string in their name (so infix:<..., prefix:<... etc.). Alter this code as needed to suit your needs.[3]

Footnotes

[1] As things stands this technique means coming up with a new name that's different from the one used by the consumer of the new type, one that won't conflict with any other packages. This suggests a suffix. I think -sawn is a reasonable choice for an unusual and distinctive and mnemonic suffix. That said, I imagine someone will eventually package this process up into a new language construct that does the work behind the scenes, generating the name and automating away the manual changes one has to make to packages with the shown technique.

[2] A critically important point is that, if a sub EXPORT is to do what you want, it must be placed outside the package definition to which it applies. And that in turn means it must be before a unit package declaration. And that in turn means any use statement relied on by that sub EXPORT must appear within the same or outer lexical scope. (This is explained in the doc but I think it bears summarizing here to try head off much head scratching because there's no error message if it's in the wrong place.)

[3] As with the circularity saw aspect discussed in footnote 1, I imagine someone will also eventually package up this import-and-export mechanism into a new construct, or, perhaps even better, an enhancement of Raku's built in use statement.

16
  • @Hanselmann I've now added the main improvement I was working on, but knew it would take a while to complete. I've gotta go away now, perhaps for several days, but please ask questions about any of it via comments here and I or others will follow up in due course. I enjoyed writing this answer; thanks for asking your question.
    – raiph
    Sep 1, 2021 at 18:52
  • 1
    I agree that the error message there is Less Than Awesome, so I submitted a PR to add the info you mentioned. @Hanselmann, thanks for bringing this up – that's how the error messages get better :) Sep 1, 2021 at 20:21
  • @raiph thanks for the answer. I didn't know or read use lib pragma shouldn't be used everywhere. As for the solution, do you know if I have to use another class to make this work? (by the way, I'm happy to use this solution). Also, I add the operators to Map manually right? Though I can read & parse the *_ops files and programatically construct the Map I think.
    – user15750474
    Sep 2, 2021 at 13:06
  • @codesections Oh that was a fast development, thanks for making the error message more descriptive for the future. I still need to read things for the "why" of the error message, but I wont hopefully attempt to use lib in a module. By the way, by "module", does it mean either a .rakumod file or a file with module keyword in it?
    – user15750474
    Sep 2, 2021 at 13:14
  • 1
    @Hanselmann I've switched to using a role as per .@codesection's original SO, suggested a naming convention, and provided one way to generate the symbol reexporting programmatically. The word "module" in the context of use lib means any .rakumod which is any package -- declared with package, module , class, role, grammar etc. For this Gordian Knot cutting technique, the module must be one that can does a CutKnot role or is a CutKnot class (which counts out plain packages or modules).
    – raiph
    Sep 2, 2021 at 21:04
0

Hi @hanselmann here is how I would write this (in 3 files / same dir):

Define my class(es):

# MyClass.rakumod
unit module MyClass;

class A is export {
    has $.x is rw; 
}

Define my operators:

# Prefix_Ops.rakumod
unit module Prefix_Ops;

use MyClass;

multi prefix:<++>(A:D $obj) is export {
    ++$obj.x;
    $obj;
}

Run my code:

# script.raku
use lib ".";
use MyClass;
use Prefix_Ops;

my $a = A.new(x => -1);
++$a;

say $a.x;   #0

Taking my cue from the Module docs there are a couple of things I am doing different:

  • Avoiding the use of main (or Main, or MAIN) --- I am wary that MAIN is a reserved name and just want to keep clear of engaging any of that (cool) machinery
  • Bringing in the unit module declaration at the top of each 'rakumod' file ... it may be possible to use bare files in Raku ... but I have never tried this and would say that it is not obvious from the docs that it is even possible, or supported
  • Now since I wanted this to work first time you will note that I use the same file name and module name ... again it may be possible to do that differently (multiple modules in one file and so on) ... but I have not tried that either
  • Using the 'is export' trait where I want my script to be able to use these definitions ... as you will know from close study of the docs ;-) is that each module has it's own namespace (the "stash") and we need export to shove the exported definitions into the namespace of the script
  • As @raiph mentions you only need the script to define the module library location
  • Since you want your prefix multi to "know" about class A then you also need to use MyClass in the Prefix_Ops module

Anyway, all-in-all, I think that the raku module system exemplifies the unique combination of "easy things easy and hard thinks doable" ... all I had to do with your code (which was very close) was tweak a few filenames and sprinkle in some concise concepts like 'unit module' and 'is export' and it really does not look much different since raku keeps all the import/export machinery under the surface like the swan gliding over the river...

7
  • oh and now I see that from your comment to Ralph answer that you want to NOT explicitly import the overloaded operators ... but have these grandfathered into your script namespace via the class import ... this will not work since you need to explicitly use the module where you export the methods in the scope where they are used... AFAIK that is a language design trade off intended to avoid overloading action at a distance that can lead to confusion
    – p6steve
    Sep 1, 2021 at 20:55
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    Hi @p6steve (and .@codesection). I originally wrote the same code as in this answer. But I wanted to add the SuperClass solution below it. Then I wondered if .@Hanselmann would appreciate seeing the simpler 3 file answer. I ended up posting that as my original answer. .@Hanselmann commented on it, seeking the SuperClass solution, without upvoting the 3 file solution. So I upvoted their comment, deleted my answer, and posted just the 4 file solution. And guess what my SuperClass solution was derived from? An earlier .@codesection answer!
    – raiph
    Sep 1, 2021 at 23:21
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    Imo the re-exporting is too hard and error prone, and there ought to be a much simpler way to do it than the manual way I did it. I'm confident there will be much simpler ways to do it one day, but there's no hurry. As you note, and I've shown, there pretty much always is a way to do anything, and Raku has all the right pieces in place to make it easy for devs to nicely package anything up in a convenient way by creating modules and/or evolving the language, as they see fit when they have tuits / consensus. All in good time...
    – raiph
    Sep 2, 2021 at 0:01
  • 1
    hi p6steve, thanks for the answer. As noted, I'd like the user to only use A; and see ++ etc. avaialble (the "user" is again me, of course...). I (try to) learn from your items: 1) I see MAIN is special, will keep in mind. 2) Documentation says something about it, perhaps accessing is different, not sure. 4-6) thanks for these remarks.
    – user15750474
    Sep 2, 2021 at 8:46
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    @Hanselmann thanks for the fb... i will leave my answer in for later readers to compare to the right one. imo this kind of action at a distance stuff ought to be a bit hard (but doable) to nudge meat + potatoes coders like me to stay (lexically) local
    – p6steve
    Sep 2, 2021 at 17:28

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