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I have a bash script from which I want to access /dev/tty, but only when it's available.

When it's not available (in my case: when running my script in GitHub Actions) then when I try to access it I get /dev/tty: No such device or address, and I'm trying to detect that in advance to avoid the error and provide fallback behaviour instead.

To do so I need a bash test that can detect cleanly this case, and which will work reliably across platforms (i.e. not using the tty command, which has issues on Mac).

I'm currently using [[ -e "/dev/tty" ]] which doesn't work - it appears to return true even on GitHub Actions, where it seems that /dev/tty exists but accessing it will fail. What should I use instead?

4
  • Would this page of the bash manual be useful?
    – ErikMD
    Sep 6 at 14:04
  • No idea why, but $- contains "hBH" in my bash, not i, so that example doesn't work.
    – Tim Perry
    Sep 6 at 14:18
  • For what purpose does the bash script want to access /dev/tty ?
    – Philippe
    Sep 6 at 15:46
  • @Philippe to launch $EDITOR connected to the TTY, from inside a pipeline of other commands (so no direct access to stdin/stdout). When /dev/tty is available that works great, and when it's not I can provide an OK fallback, but I need to be able to detect that.
    – Tim Perry
    Sep 6 at 18:31
1

Try this approach :

if  test "$(ps -p "$$" -o tty=)" = "?"; then
    echo "/dev/tty is not available."
else
    echo "/dev/tty is available."
fi
1
  • I've done some testing and this seems to work pretty well! I've upvoted but I'm going to use my own slightly simpler answer below that just uses printf & bash instead, just because I'm slightly worried that complex ps commands like this might work slightly differently on Mac and other weird environments (see apple.stackexchange.com/questions/300864/… for example).
    – Tim Perry
    Sep 7 at 12:28
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After testing lots of promising but not quite perfect suggestions (see the other answers), I think I've found my own solution that does exactly fit my needs:

if bash -c ": >/dev/tty" >/dev/null 2>/dev/null; then
    # /dev/tty is available and usable
else
    # /dev/tty is not available
fi

To explain:

: >/dev/tty does nothing (using the : bash built-in) and outputs the nothing to /dev/tty, thereby checking that it exists & it's writable, but not actually producing any visible output. If this succeeds, we're good.

If we do that at the top level without a /dev/tty, bash itself produces a noisy error in our output, complaining about /dev/tty being unusable. This can't be redirected and silenced because it comes from bash itself, not the printf command.

Wrapping that with bash -c "..." >/dev/null 2>/dev/null runs the test in a bash subshell, with stdout/stderr removed, and so silences all errors & warnings while still returning the overall exit code.

Suggestions for further improvements welcome. For reference, I'm testing this with setsid <command>, which seems to be a good simulation of the TTY-less environment I'm having trouble with.

3
  • 2
    Good idea, you can just do bash -c ': >/dev/tty' ...
    – Philippe
    Sep 7 at 15:33
  • That's even better! Thanks @Philippe, I've updated the answer
    – Tim Perry
    Sep 8 at 10:30
  • Indeed, this seems a simple and portable solution :-)
    – ErikMD
    Sep 14 at 20:27
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It seems that adapting this answer from this question on ServerFault (entitled How can I check in bash if a shell is running in interactive mode?, which is close to your question albeit not an exact duplicate) could be a solution for your use case.

So, could you try writing either:

  • [ -t 0 ] && [ -t 1 ] && echo your code
  • or [ -t 0 ] && echo your code ?

For completeness, here is one link documenting this POSIX flag -t, which is thus portable:

https://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/test.html

-t file_descriptor
True if file descriptor number file_descriptor is open and is associated with a terminal.
False if file_descriptor is not a valid file descriptor number, or if file descriptor number file_descriptor is not open, or if it is open but is not associated with a terminal.

Furthermore, if you use bash (not just a POSIX-compliant shell), you might want to combine this idea with the special 255 file descriptor number: [ -t 255 ].

Source: On Unix&Linux-SE,

That 255 file descriptor is an open handle to the controlling tty and is only used when bash is run in interactive mode. […]

In Bash, what is file descriptor 255 for, can I use it? (by @mosvy)

9
  • In my case, stdin & stdout are pipes to other processes, so -t 0 & -t 1 are false, and this won't work. I still want to communicate with the controlling TTY when one is available though, by using /dev/tty directly. When /dev/tty is available this works fine! But not in completely TTY-less environments.
    – Tim Perry
    Sep 6 at 14:16
  • OK but do you think you could adapt my suggestion and "keep" the stdin available via another FD number, just for this test purpose?
    – ErikMD
    Sep 6 at 14:18
  • How? Can you give an example? This script is run as part of a pipeline, so it never has any access to the TTY via stdin or any FD, so I can't "keep" it.
    – Tim Perry
    Sep 6 at 14:22
  • For example, if you use bash (not just a POSIX shell), I've just seen in this SE thread that the special FD number 255 (to make available /dev/tty even if stdin/stdout have been redirected) might be a solution for you to test (namely, [ -t 255 ]…)
    – ErikMD
    Sep 6 at 14:44
  • FD 255 is an option, that might work. It would be better to have an option to test /dev/tty itself though, without being dependent on bash internal implementation details. I'd really prefer to check the state of the tty device I want to use directly, rather than patch in another workaround.
    – Tim Perry
    Sep 6 at 18:36
0

Beyond the other answers mentioned in this thread (and as an alternative to the other idea involving $-, which did not seem to work for you), what about this other idea mentioned in the bash manual?

if [ -z "$PS1" ]; then
    echo This shell is not interactive
else
    echo This shell is interactive
fi
1
  • Good suggestion, but this doesn't seem to work reliably unfortunately... In my testing, when running a saved script in bash (v5) then $PS1 is unset, even if it's set in the terminal itself & /dev/tty is working (also: this actually needs to be ${PS1+x} to handle the case where it's set but empty).
    – Tim Perry
    Sep 7 at 10:56

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