3

I was wondering whether it was possible to vectorise this implementation of VLAD computation.

For context:

feats = numpy array of shape (T, N, F)

kmeans = KMeans object from scikit-learn initialised with K clusters.

Current method

k = kmeans.n_clusters # K
centers = kmeans.cluster_centers_ # (K, F)
vlad_feats = []

for feat in feats:
    # feat shape - (N, F) 
    cluster_label = kmeans.predict(feat) #(N,)
    vlad = np.zeros((k, feat.shape[1])) # (K, F)

    # computing the differences for all the clusters (visual words)
    for i in range(k):
        # if there is at least one descriptor in that cluster
        if np.sum(cluster_label == i) > 0:
            # add the differences
            vlad[i] = np.sum(feat[cluster_label == i, :] - centers[i], axis=0)
    vlad = vlad.flatten() # (K*F,)
    # L2 normalization
    vlad = vlad / np.sqrt(np.dot(vlad, vlad))
    vlad_feats.append(vlad)

vlad_feats = np.array(vlad_feats) # (T, K*F)

Getting the kmeans predictions as a batch is not a problem as we can do as follows:

feats2 = feats.reshape(-1, F) # (T*N, F)
labels = kmeans.predict(feats2) # (T*N, )

But I'm stuck at computing cluster distances.

2 Answers 2

3

You've started on the right approach. Let's try to pull all the lines out of the loop one by one. First, the predictions:

cluster_label = kmeans.predict(feats.reshape(-1, F)).reshape(T, N)  # T, N

You don't really need the check np.sum(cluster_label == i) > 0, since the sum will just turn out to be zero anyway. Your goal is to add up the distances from the center for each of the K labels in each T and feature.

You can compute the k masks cluster_label == i using simple broadcasting. You'll want the last dimension to be K:

mask = cluster_label[..., None] == np.arange(k)   # T, N, K

You can also compute the k differences feats - centers[i] using a more complex broadcast:

delta = feats[..., None, :] - centers # T, N, K, F

You can now multiply the differences by the mask and reduce along the N dimension by summing:

vlad = (delta * mask[..., None]).sum(axis=1).reshape(T, -1)  # T, K * F

From here, the normalization should be trivial:

vlad /= np.linalg.norm(vlad, axis=1, keepdims=True)
3
  • Thanks for your answer. But computing delta, delta = feats[..., None, :] - centers[:, None] fails because centers[:,None] is of shape (K, 1, F) while feats[..., None, :] is of shape (T, N, 1, F)
    – ashnair1
    Sep 8, 2021 at 6:27
  • Ah got it. It was feats[...,None,:] - centers[None,:]
    – ashnair1
    Sep 8, 2021 at 6:48
  • @AshwinNair. Thanks for the catch. It's even simpler. I had specifically introduced the unit dimension there so you could use centers directly. Sep 8, 2021 at 12:58
2

While @MadPhysicist's answer vectorizes, I've found it hurts performance.

Below, looping is essentially a re-written version of OP's algorithm and naivec employs vectorization through the exploded 4D tensor.

import numpy as np
from sklearn.cluster import MiniBatchKMeans

def looping(kmeans: MiniBatchKMeans, local_tlf):
    k, (t, l, f) = kmeans.n_clusters, local_tlf.shape
    centers_kf = kmeans.cluster_centers_
    vlad_tkf = np.zeros((t, k, f))
    for vlad_kf, local_lf in zip(vlad_tkf, local_tlf):
        label_l = kmeans.predict(local_lf)
        for i in range(k):
            vlad_kf[i] = np.sum(local_lf[label_l == i] - centers_kf[i], axis=0)
        vlad_D = vlad_kf.ravel()
        vlad_D = np.sign(vlad_D) * np.sqrt(np.abs(vlad_D))
        vlad_D /= np.linalg.norm(vlad_D)
        vlad_kf[:,:] = vlad_D.reshape(k, f)
    return vlad_tkf.reshape(t, -1)


def naivec(kmeans: MiniBatchKMeans, local_tlf):
    k, (t, l, f) = kmeans.n_clusters, local_tlf.shape
    centers_kf = kmeans.cluster_centers_
    labels_tl = kmeans.predict(local_tlf.reshape(-1,f)).reshape(t, l)
    mask_tlk = labels_tl[..., np.newaxis] == np.arange(k)
    local_tl1f = local_tlf[...,np.newaxis,:]
    delta_tlkf = local_tl1f - centers_kf # <-- easy to run out of memory
    vlad_tD = (delta_tlkf * mask_tlk[..., np.newaxis]).sum(axis=1).reshape(t, -1)
    vlad_tD = np.sign(vlad_tD) * np.sqrt(np.abs(vlad_tD))
    vlad_tD /= np.linalg.norm(vlad_tD, axis=1, keepdims=True)
    return vlad_tD

Indeed, see below for a benchmark.

np.random.seed(1234)
# usually there are a lot more images than this
t, l, f, k = 256, 128, 64, 512
X = np.random.randn(t, l, f)
km = MiniBatchKMeans(n_clusters=16, n_init=10, random_state=0)
km.fit(X.reshape(-1, f))

result_looping = looping(km, X)
result_naivec = naivec(km, X)

%timeit looping(km, X) # ~200 ms
%timeit naivec(km, X) # ~300 ms

assert np.allclose(result_looping, result_naivec)

An idiomatic vectorization which avoids memory growing beyond output size (asymptotically) would leverage a scatter reduction.

def truvec(kmeans: MiniBatchKMeans, local_tlf):
    k, (t, l, f) = kmeans.n_clusters, local_tlf.shape
    centers_kf = kmeans.cluster_centers_
    labels_tl = kmeans.predict(local_tlf.reshape(-1,f)).reshape(t, l)
    
    vlad_tkf = np.zeros((t, k, f))
    M = t * k
    labels_tl += np.arange(t)[:, np.newaxis] * k
    vlad_Mf = vlad_tkf.reshape(-1, f)
    np.add.at(vlad_Mf, labels_tl.ravel(), local_tlf.reshape(-1, f))
    counts_M = np.bincount(labels_tl.ravel(), minlength=M)
    vlad_tkf -= counts_M.reshape(t, k, 1) * centers_kf
    
    vlad_tD = vlad_tkf.reshape(t, -1)
    vlad_tD = np.sign(vlad_tD) * np.sqrt(np.abs(vlad_tD))
    vlad_tD /= np.linalg.norm(vlad_tD, axis=1, keepdims=True)
    return vlad_tD

However, disappointingly, this also only gets us about 200 ms computation time. This boils down to two reasons:

  • the inner loop is already vectorized in looping()
  • np.add.at actually cannot use vectorized CPU instructions, unlike the original strided reduction np.sum(local_lf[label_l == i] - centers_kf[i], axis=0)

A performant vectorized version of the VLAD algorithm requires some sophisticated techniques to leverage contiguous array accesses. This version gets 40% improvement over looping(), but requires a lot of setup---see my blog on the approach here.

4
  • Neat. I came to check why OP unselected my answer. It was well deserved. Have you considered throwing numba into the mix? Sep 25, 2021 at 16:04
  • @MadPhysicist Just wanted to clarify the main reason for selecting this one. As mentioned in this answer I did run into the out of memory problem. Using the truvec variant proposed in this answer I was able to solve the issue.
    – ashnair1
    Sep 26, 2021 at 6:02
  • @AshwinNair. This answer is objectively better than mine in every way. Sep 26, 2021 at 6:03
  • @MadPhysicist, thank you! Not quite numba, but I did convert this to jax, which gets us to essentially the same place. It lets me target a TPU backend which then gets 400% speedup over looping (a bit apples-to-oranges at that point though).
    – VF1
    Sep 28, 2021 at 16:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.