-5
    main() {     
        char c1='a' , c2='A';     
        int i=c2-c1;     
        printf("%d", i); 
    }

What is the output of this code. Please explain why? I know the Answer is -32 but Can someone explain why it's -32?

3
  • 5
    That's the difference between a lower case letter and its upper case equivalent in the ASCII table. Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 13:02
  • 1
    I get the answer 64 on my EBCDICBFG2000 computer. So strictly speaking the result isn't guaranteed. Though in practice most people use computers with ASCII or UTF8.
    – Lundin
    Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 13:23
  • What do you think the answer should be? And why so? Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 13:50

2 Answers 2

5

Every ascii char is stored as a number between 0 and 127 inclusive, looking at the ascii table you can see that a is stored as 97 while A is stored as 65.

What you are doing is subtracting a from A and then printing it as integer.

Hence why the result is 65-97=-32

3
  • 2
    In your answer, you wrote: "Every char is stored as a number between 0 and 127 inclusive". This is not quite correct. On most platforms, the data type char is signed and can store values between -128 to 127. However, on some platforms, char is unsigned and allows values between 0 and 255. Both variants are permitted by the ISO C standard. ASCII only standardizes the first 127 characters, but the characters 128 to 255 can still be used for other characters. The meaning of these characters normally depends on the code page that is currently in use. Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 13:23
  • And on yet other platforms, char has an even wider range. Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 13:49
  • @AndreasWenzel you're correct, I wrote the answer quite hastily during my lunch break. I added a small edit to specify every ascii char to be more precise
    – John Doe
    Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 14:35
3

please explain why the output of the code is -32?

It is because the used compiler uses the ASCII encoding character set where codes of upper case letters are less than codes of corresponding lower case letters by 32.

Here is a demonstrative program.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main(void) 
{
    for ( char upper_case = 'A'; upper_case <= 'Z'; ++upper_case )
    {
        char lower_case = tolower( ( unsigned char )upper_case );
        
        printf( "%c = %d, %c = %d, %c - %c = %d\n",
                upper_case, upper_case, lower_case, lower_case, 
                upper_case, lower_case,
                upper_case - lower_case );
    }
    
    return 0;
}

Its output is

A = 65, a = 97, A - a = -32
B = 66, b = 98, B - b = -32
C = 67, c = 99, C - c = -32
D = 68, d = 100, D - d = -32
E = 69, e = 101, E - e = -32
F = 70, f = 102, F - f = -32
G = 71, g = 103, G - g = -32
H = 72, h = 104, H - h = -32
I = 73, i = 105, I - i = -32
J = 74, j = 106, J - j = -32
K = 75, k = 107, K - k = -32
L = 76, l = 108, L - l = -32
M = 77, m = 109, M - m = -32
N = 78, n = 110, N - n = -32
O = 79, o = 111, O - o = -32
P = 80, p = 112, P - p = -32
Q = 81, q = 113, Q - q = -32
R = 82, r = 114, R - r = -32
S = 83, s = 115, S - s = -32
T = 84, t = 116, T - t = -32
U = 85, u = 117, U - u = -32
V = 86, v = 118, V - v = -32
W = 87, w = 119, W - w = -32
X = 88, x = 120, X - x = -32
Y = 89, y = 121, Y - y = -32
Z = 90, z = 122, Z - z = -32

If your compiler would use the EBCDIC encoding character set then the difference between codes of upper case letters and corresponding lower case letters is equal to 64.

I know the Answer is -32 but

The answer depends on the used encoding character set. It may be for example equal to -32 or -64.:)

0

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