5

I'm trying to convert an makefile-build to cmake (to avoid the current state of being forced to take care for the windows-build env based on make/msdev and the linux based on make/gcc).

In this project, I've found a directory full of sourcecode files that get, based on a naming convention, compiled to libraries. (e.g. c1223.c => c1223.dll (or .sl) )

The current makefile consists of some directives using wildcards, e.g.:

LIB_NO  = $(basename $(subst s,,$@))

OBJ = $(OBJ_PATH)/s$(LIB_NO).o $(OBJ_PATH)/c$(LIB_NO).o\
          $(OBJ_PATH)/b$(LIB_NO).o

$(OBJ_PATH)/%.o : %.c
    -$(CC) $(CFLAGS) -I$(PWD) -c $< -o $@
    -(chmod a+w $@;true)

I've searched for a while but can't find anything that seems to work. Is it even possible with cmake to let it generate a wildcard based build?

Any comments, hints and suggestions are very welcome :)

cheers Markus

3

You can use fairly primitive globbing (there's no regular expression syntax that I can see).

file(GLOB TESTSRCS "test/src/*.cpp")

# Compile the test sources.
add_executable(Tests ${TESTSRCS})

target_link_libraries(Tests ${LIB} gtest gtest_main)

The actual makefiles do not seem to contain wildcard searches inside them. If you add new files you will need to re-run cmake.

What I don't know is how you would manage to wrap up the library creation in a single macro if you have many different library files to generate.

You might be able to do something like this if there's only one c file per library:

file(GLOB libfiles "path/to/libs/c*.c")

foreach(libfile ${libfiles})
    GET_FILENAME_COMPONENT(libname ${libfile} NAME) # remove the '.c' part (untested, hopefully this will work)
    add_library(${libname} ${libfile})
endforeach(libfile)

If anybody else has a better solution, I would also like to learn it.

  • Thanks a lot for your reply, in the meantme i ran into other issues that need to be solved first, I'll get back to this :) – Markus Aug 5 '11 at 7:06
0

CMake does not generate makefiles that have wildcard-based rules in them. It generates specific rules for the files that it knows about.

In your example, you are explicitly listing the .o files that comprise your library. In CMake, you would instead explicitly list the source files that contribute to your library, and then let CMake take care of the rest.

Do you need makefiles that have wildcard-based rules in them for some reason?

Couldn't you simply construct a list of the source files, and then, for each element in the list, do an "add_library" call with the source file and a library name constructed from the source file name?

  • Thanks a lot for your reply, in the meantme i ran into other issues that need to be solved first, I'll get back to this :) – Markus Aug 5 '11 at 7:07
  • Couldn't you simply construct a list of the source files: the whole point of GnuMake wildcards is to avoid maintaining manually such a list, which will eventually get outdated. – kebs Mar 30 '18 at 12:55

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