11

Similar questions have been asked about counting pairs, however none seem to be specifically useful for what I'm trying to do.

What I want is to count the number of pairs across multiple list elements and turn it into a matrix. For example, if I have a list like so:

myList <- list(
  a = c(2,4,6),
  b = c(1,2,3,4),
  c = c(1,2,5,7),
  d = c(1,2,4,5,8)
)

We can see that the pair 1:2 appears 3 times (once each in a, b, and c). The pair 1:3 appears only once in b. The pair 1:4 appears 2 times (once each in b and d)... etc.

I would like to count the number of times a pair appears and then turn it into a symmetrical matrix. For example, my desired output would look something like the matrix I created manually (where each element of the matrix is the total count for that pair of values):

> myMatrix
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8]
[1,]    0    3    1    2    2    0    1    1
[2,]    3    0    1    3    2    1    1    1
[3,]    1    1    0    1    0    0    0    0
[4,]    2    3    1    0    0    0    0    1
[5,]    2    2    0    0    0    0    1    1
[6,]    0    1    0    0    0    0    0    0
[7,]    1    1    0    0    1    0    0    0
[8,]    1    1    0    1    1    0    0    0

Any suggestions are greatly appreciated

4
  • probably made a mistake .. tcrossprod(sapply(myList, function(x) table(factor(x, 1:8))))
    – user20650
    Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 23:20
  • 1
    microbenchmark shows that @user20650 trcrossprod is 300 times faster than @akrun 's Reduce code is. Commented Sep 8, 2021 at 13:50
  • I think the answers supplied only work if you guarantee there are no duplicate entries in each source vector. If there are, e.g. myList$a = c(2,4,2) then you can't distinguish between the unwanted diagonals and the actual pair 2,2 found . Commented Sep 8, 2021 at 17:53
  • Oh, and I think won't work if the input vectors are not ordered, either Commented Sep 8, 2021 at 17:59

4 Answers 4

9

Inspired by @akrun's answer, I think you can use a crossproduct to get this very quickly and simply:

out <- tcrossprod(table(stack(myList)))
diag(out) <- 0

#      values
#values 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
#     1 0 3 1 2 2 0 1 1
#     2 3 0 1 3 2 1 1 1
#     3 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
#     4 2 3 1 0 1 1 0 1
#     5 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 1
#     6 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
#     7 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0
#     8 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0

Original answer:

Use combn to get the combinations, as well as reversing each combination.
Then convert to a data.frame and table the results.

tab <- lapply(myList, \(x) combn(x, m=2, FUN=\(cm) rbind(cm, rev(cm)), simplify=FALSE))
tab <- data.frame(do.call(rbind, unlist(tab, rec=FALSE)))
table(tab)

#   X2
#X1  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
#  1 0 3 1 2 2 0 1 1
#  2 3 0 1 3 2 1 1 1
#  3 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
#  4 2 3 1 0 1 1 0 1
#  5 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 1
#  6 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
#  7 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0
#  8 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0
1
  • After revisiting the code, it seems that under certain conditions (which I haven't figured out yet), akrun's code was producing small errors where it wouldn't sum the total number of pairs correctly. That coupled with the speed increase made me change this to the best answer. Thanks!
    – Electrino
    Commented Oct 16, 2021 at 15:44
8

We could loop over the list, get the pairwise combinations with combn, stack it to a two column dataset, convert the 'values' column to factor with levels specified as 1 to 8, get the frequency count (table), do a cross product (crossprod), convert the output back to logical, and then Reduce the list elements by adding elementwise and finally assign the diagonal elements to 0. (If needed set the names attributes of dimnames to NULL

out <- Reduce(`+`, lapply(myList, function(x) 
        crossprod(table(transform(stack(setNames(
          combn(x,
         2, simplify = FALSE), combn(x, 2, paste, collapse="_"))), 
          values = factor(values, levels = 1:8))[2:1]))> 0))
diag(out) <- 0
names(dimnames(out)) <- NULL

-output

> out
  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 0 3 1 2 2 0 1 1
2 3 0 1 3 2 1 1 1
3 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
4 2 3 1 0 1 1 0 1
5 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 1
6 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
7 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0
8 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0
6
  • Master akrun, could you please check my answer. Am I completely wrong. I tried to count all the combinations. Thanks in advance!
    – TarJae
    Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 22:14
  • 1
    @TarJae Perhaps you may need to use pivot_wider at the end
    – akrun
    Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 22:15
  • 1
    Why not use the crossproduct to do all the hard work? - `diag<-`(tcrossprod(table(stack(myList))), 0) . I totally overlooked that possibility, but I think it works. Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 23:48
  • @thelatemail next step: do a time-test for tcrossprod vs your lapply(combn) code. I'm betting on crossproduct :-) Commented Sep 8, 2021 at 12:58
  • 3
    see comment at question: that tcrossprod is 300 times faster than this. Commented Sep 8, 2021 at 13:53
2

I thought of a solution based on @TarJae answer, is not a elegant one, but it was a fun challenge!

Libraries

library(tidyverse)

Code

map_df(myList,function(x) as_tibble(t(combn(x,2)))) %>% 
  count(V1,V2) %>% 
  {. -> temp_df} %>% 
  bind_rows(
    temp_df %>% 
      rename(V2 = V1, V1 = V2) 
  ) %>% 
  full_join(
    expand_grid(V1 = 1:8,V2 = 1:8)
  ) %>% 
  replace_na(replace = list(n = 0)) %>% 
  arrange(V2,V1) %>% 
  pivot_wider(names_from = V1,values_from = n) %>% 
  as.matrix()

Output

     V2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
[1,]  1 0 3 1 2 2 0 1 1
[2,]  2 3 0 1 3 2 1 1 1
[3,]  3 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
[4,]  4 2 3 1 0 1 1 0 1
[5,]  5 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 1
[6,]  6 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
[7,]  7 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0
[8,]  8 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0
1
  • Why bother with the rename? Just swap the input order of subsequent calls maybe? Commented Sep 8, 2021 at 12:56
1

First identify the possible combination of each vector from the list to a tibble then I bind them to one tibble and count the combinations.

library(tidyverse)

a <- as_tibble(t(combn(myList[[1]],2)))
b <- as_tibble(t(combn(myList[[2]],2)))
c <- as_tibble(t(combn(myList[[3]],2)))
d <- as_tibble(t(combn(myList[[4]],2)))

bind_rows(a,b,c,d) %>% 
    count(V1, V2)
      V1    V2     n
   <dbl> <dbl> <int>
 1     1     2     3
 2     1     3     1
 3     1     4     2
 4     1     5     2
 5     1     7     1
 6     1     8     1
 7     2     3     1
 8     2     4     3
 9     2     5     2
10     2     6     1
11     2     7     1
12     2     8     1
13     3     4     1
14     4     5     1
15     4     6     1
16     4     8     1
17     5     7     1
18     5     8     1

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