28

In Python, what is the best way to determine if an IP address (e.g., '127.0.0.1' or '10.98.76.6') is on a private network? The code does not sound difficult to write. But there may be more edge cases than are immediately apparent, and there's IPv6 support to consider, etc. Is there an existing library that does it?

39

Check out the IPy module. If has a function iptype() that seems to do what you want:

>>> from IPy import IP
>>> ip = IP('127.0.0.0/30')
>>> ip.iptype()
'PRIVATE'
4
  • As expected for a public IP, the string is 'PUBLIC'. There are a few unexpected results: print(IP('127.0.0.1').iptype()) yields PRIVATE. print(IP('::1').iptype()) yields LOOPBACK. print(IP('2001:0658:022a:cafe:0200::1').iptype()) yields ALLOCATED RIPE NCC – Steve Tauber May 18 '12 at 17:34
  • There are indeed a few unexpected results: print(IP('0.0.0.0/0').iptype()) yields 'PRIVATE', while I'd expect "the whole IPv4 internet" to be PUBLIC... – Niobos Feb 14 '18 at 16:00
  • Should I use it to prevent SSRF? – Marat Mkhitaryan Mar 1 '19 at 7:01
  • How are you intending to use it to prevent SSRF ? – qre0ct Oct 13 '19 at 11:46
70

Since Python 3.3 there is an ipaddress module in the stdlib that you can use.

>>> import ipaddress
>>> ipaddress.ip_address('192.168.0.1').is_private
True

If using Python 2.6 or higher I would strongly recommend to use a backport of this module.

24

You can check that yourself using http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1918 and http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3330. If you have 127.0.0.1 you just need to & it with the mask (lets say 255.0.0.0) and see if the value matches any of the private network's network address. So using inet_pton you can do: 127.0.0.1 & 255.0.0.0 = 127.0.0.0

Here is the code that illustrates that:

from struct import unpack
from socket import AF_INET, inet_pton

def lookup(ip):
    f = unpack('!I',inet_pton(AF_INET,ip))[0]
    private = (
        [ 2130706432, 4278190080 ], # 127.0.0.0,   255.0.0.0   http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3330
        [ 3232235520, 4294901760 ], # 192.168.0.0, 255.255.0.0 http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1918
        [ 2886729728, 4293918720 ], # 172.16.0.0,  255.240.0.0 http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1918
        [ 167772160,  4278190080 ], # 10.0.0.0,    255.0.0.0   http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1918
    ) 
    for net in private:
        if (f & net[1]) == net[0]:
            return True
    return False

# example
print(lookup("127.0.0.1"))
print(lookup("192.168.10.1"))
print(lookup("10.10.10.10"))
print(lookup("172.17.255.255"))
# outputs True True True True

another implementation is to compute the int values of all private blocks:

from struct import unpack
from socket import AF_INET, inet_pton

lookup = "127.0.0.1"
f = unpack('!I',inet_pton(AF_INET,lookup))[0]
private = (["127.0.0.0","255.0.0.0"],["192.168.0.0","255.255.0.0"],["172.16.0.0","255.240.0.0"],["10.0.0.0","255.0.0.0"])
for net in private:
    mask = unpack('!I',inet_aton(net[1]))[0]
    p = unpack('!I',inet_aton(net[0]))[0]
    if (f & mask) == p:
        print lookup + " is private"
8

This is the fixed version of the regex approach suggested by @Kurt including the fix recommended by @RobEvans

  • ^127.\d{1,3}.\d{1,3}.\d{1,3}$

  • ^10.\d{1,3}.\d{1,3}.\d{1,3}$

  • ^192.168.\d{1,3}.\d{1,3}$

  • ^172.(1[6-9]|2[0-9]|3[0-1]).[0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}$

     def is_ip_private(ip):
    
         # https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network
    
         priv_lo = re.compile("^127\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}$")
         priv_24 = re.compile("^10\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}$")
         priv_20 = re.compile("^192\.168\.\d{1,3}.\d{1,3}$")
         priv_16 = re.compile("^172.(1[6-9]|2[0-9]|3[0-1]).[0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}$")
    
         res = priv_lo.match(ip) or priv_24.match(ip) or priv_20.match(ip) or priv_16.match(ip)
         return res is not None
    

This will not 100.x.x.x range which is used internally in kubernetes

1
  • +1, I'd suggest returning a boolean "wrapper", to better reflect the function name: return (priv_lo.match(ip) or priv_24.match(ip) or priv_20.match(ip) or priv_16.match(ip)) is not None – mork Aug 3 '17 at 5:46
2

A few days after asking this question, I found out about this Google project, ipaddr-py, which appears to have some of the same functionality with respect to determining if an address is private (is_rfc1918). Apparently this will be standard in Python 3.1.

2
2

I find this in cuckoo.There is no need to install new modules.Just import two built-in modules: socket and struct. And use function below.

def _is_private_ip(self, ip):
    """Check if the IP belongs to private network blocks.
    @param ip: IP address to verify.
    @return: boolean representing whether the IP belongs or not to
             a private network block.
    """
    networks = [
        "0.0.0.0/8",
        "10.0.0.0/8",
        "100.64.0.0/10",
        "127.0.0.0/8",
        "169.254.0.0/16",
        "172.16.0.0/12",
        "192.0.0.0/24",
        "192.0.2.0/24",
        "192.88.99.0/24",
        "192.168.0.0/16",
        "198.18.0.0/15",
        "198.51.100.0/24",
        "203.0.113.0/24",
        "240.0.0.0/4",
        "255.255.255.255/32",
        "224.0.0.0/4",
    ]

    for network in networks:
        try:
            ipaddr = struct.unpack(">I", socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]

            netaddr, bits = network.split("/")

            network_low = struct.unpack(">I", socket.inet_aton(netaddr))[0]
            network_high = network_low | 1 << (32 - int(bits)) - 1

            if ipaddr <= network_high and ipaddr >= network_low:
                return True
        except Exception,err:
            continue

    return False
0
1

If you want to avoid importing a module you can just apply a simple regex:

  • ^127.\d{1,3}.\d{1,3}.\d{1,3}$
  • ^10.\d{1,3}.\d{1,3}.\d{1,3}$
  • ^192.168.\d{1,3}$
  • ^172.(1[6-9]|2[0-9]|3[0-1]).[0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}$
3
  • 1
    Shouldn't those . characters be escaped via \. ? I guess the pattern will still work either way though. – Rob Evans Apr 12 '13 at 11:55
  • 1
    That regex did not work for me, but if you substitute {123} by {1,3} it works fine. – Tk421 Feb 15 '15 at 22:26
  • I beg to disagree - it might work, but it's not simple. if I look at all these special characters and such, the term "simple" as I understand it doesn't apply to that regex... can you read, memorize it quickly and write it down again without looking at it(and without reconstructing it by the rules you applied)? Can you see at a glance if something is wrong / changed? So, IMHO yes, if you have reasons or constraints that make adding external code impossible/unwanted it works, but it's a complex and hard to debug/understand/memorize/verify expression. – Henning Aug 24 '18 at 19:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.