390

NumPy proposes a way to get the index of the maximum value of an array via np.argmax.

I would like a similar thing, but returning the indexes of the N maximum values.

For instance, if I have an array, [1, 3, 2, 4, 5], function(array, n=3) would return the indices [4, 3, 1] which correspond to the elements [5, 4, 3].

  • 2
  • 4
    Your question is not really well defined. For example, what would the indices (you expect) to be for array([5, 1, 5, 5, 2, 3, 2, 4, 1, 5]), whit n= 3? Which one of all the alternatives, like [0, 2, 3], [0, 2, 9], ... would be the correct one? Please elaborate more on your specific requirements. Thanks – eat Aug 2 '11 at 17:02
  • @eat, I don't really care about which one is supposed to be returned in this specific case. Even if it seem logical to return the first one encountered, that's not a requirement for me. – Alexis Métaireau Aug 3 '11 at 16:46
  • argsort might be a viable alternative if you do not care about the order of the returned indeces. See my answer below. – blue May 13 '16 at 14:24

15 Answers 15

271

The simplest I've been able to come up with is:

In [1]: import numpy as np

In [2]: arr = np.array([1, 3, 2, 4, 5])

In [3]: arr.argsort()[-3:][::-1]
Out[3]: array([4, 3, 1])

This involves a complete sort of the array. I wonder if numpy provides a built-in way to do a partial sort; so far I haven't been able to find one.

If this solution turns out to be too slow (especially for small n), it may be worth looking at coding something up in Cython.

  • Could line 3 be written equivalently as arr.argsort()[-1:-4:-1]? I've tried it in interpreter and it comes up with the same result, but I'm wondering if it's not broken by some example. – abroekhof Sep 20 '12 at 9:05
  • 29
    @abroekhof Yes that should be equivalent for any list or array. Alternatively, this could be done without the reversal by using np.argsort(-arr)[:3], which I find more readable and to the point. – askewchan May 29 '13 at 19:48
  • 6
    what does [::-1] mean? @NPE – 1a1a11a Oct 17 '16 at 5:29
  • @1a1a11a it means reverse an array (literally, takes a copy of an array from unconstrained min to unconstrained max in a reversed order) – FizBack Oct 19 '16 at 13:51
  • 7
    arr.argsort()[::-1][:n] is better because it returns empty for n=0 instead of the full array – abora Sep 8 '17 at 1:34
490

Newer NumPy versions (1.8 and up) have a function called argpartition for this. To get the indices of the four largest elements, do

>>> a = np.array([9, 4, 4, 3, 3, 9, 0, 4, 6, 0])
>>> a
array([9, 4, 4, 3, 3, 9, 0, 4, 6, 0])
>>> ind = np.argpartition(a, -4)[-4:]
>>> ind
array([1, 5, 8, 0])
>>> a[ind]
array([4, 9, 6, 9])

Unlike argsort, this function runs in linear time in the worst case, but the returned indices are not sorted, as can be seen from the result of evaluating a[ind]. If you need that too, sort them afterwards:

>>> ind[np.argsort(a[ind])]
array([1, 8, 5, 0])

To get the top-k elements in sorted order in this way takes O(n + k log k) time.

  • 23
    @varela argpartition runs in linear time, O(n), using the introselect algorithm. The subsequent sort only handles k elements, so that runs in O(k log k). – Fred Foo Nov 26 '14 at 15:52
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    If anybody is wondering how exactly np.argpartition and its sister algorithm np.partition work there is a more detailed explanation in the linked question: stackoverflow.com/questions/10337533/… – Ramon Martinez Mar 30 '16 at 14:49
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    @FredFoo: why did you use -4? did you do that to start backward?(since k being positive or negative works the same for me! it only prints the smallest numbers first! – Breeze Nov 19 '16 at 10:27
  • 2
    @LKT use a=np.array([9, 4, 4, 3, 3, 9, 0, 4, 6, 0]) because normal python lists do not support indexing by lists, unlike np.array – Marawan Okasha Aug 8 '17 at 19:34
  • 1
    how to use this method to find the indices of top n values of each row of a matrix? – Umang singhal Feb 2 '18 at 12:08
40

Simpler yet:

idx = (-arr).argsort()[:n]

where n is the number of maximum values.

  • 6
    Can this be done for a 2d array? If not, do you perhaps know how? – Andrew Hundt Sep 23 '15 at 2:17
  • 2
    @AndrewHundt : simply use (-arr).argsort(axis=-1)[:, :n] – MiniQuark Dec 29 '18 at 3:44
  • similar would be arr[arr.argsort()[-n:]] instead of negating the array, just take a slice of the last n elements – loganjones16 Mar 12 at 3:50
29

Use:

>>> import heapq
>>> import numpy
>>> a = numpy.array([1, 3, 2, 4, 5])
>>> heapq.nlargest(3, range(len(a)), a.take)
[4, 3, 1]

For regular Python lists:

>>> a = [1, 3, 2, 4, 5]
>>> heapq.nlargest(3, range(len(a)), a.__getitem__)
[4, 3, 1]

If you use Python 2, use xrange instead of range.

Source: heapq — Heap queue algorithm

  • 1
    There's no need of a loop at all here: heapq.nlargest(3, xrange(len(a)), a.take). For Python lists we can use .__getitem__ instead of .take. – Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 28 '14 at 9:09
  • For n-dimensional arrays A in general: heapq.nlargest(3, range(len(A.ravel())), A.ravel().take). (I hope this only operates on views, see also (ravel vs flatten](stackoverflow.com/a/28930580/603003)). – ComFreek Nov 10 '17 at 17:57
27

If you happen to be working with a multidimensional array then you'll need to flatten and unravel the indices:

def largest_indices(ary, n):
    """Returns the n largest indices from a numpy array."""
    flat = ary.flatten()
    indices = np.argpartition(flat, -n)[-n:]
    indices = indices[np.argsort(-flat[indices])]
    return np.unravel_index(indices, ary.shape)

For example:

>>> xs = np.sin(np.arange(9)).reshape((3, 3))
>>> xs
array([[ 0.        ,  0.84147098,  0.90929743],
       [ 0.14112001, -0.7568025 , -0.95892427],
       [-0.2794155 ,  0.6569866 ,  0.98935825]])
>>> largest_indices(xs, 3)
(array([2, 0, 0]), array([2, 2, 1]))
>>> xs[largest_indices(xs, 3)]
array([ 0.98935825,  0.90929743,  0.84147098])
9

If you don't care about the order of the K-th largest elements you can use argpartition, which should perform better than a full sort through argsort.

K = 4 # We want the indices of the four largest values
a = np.array([0, 8, 0, 4, 5, 8, 8, 0, 4, 2])
np.argpartition(a,-K)[-K:]
array([4, 1, 5, 6])

Credits go to this question.

I ran a few tests and it looks like argpartition outperforms argsort as the size of the array and the value of K increase.

7

For multidimensional arrays you can use the axis keyword in order to apply the partitioning along the expected axis.

# For a 2D array
indices = np.argpartition(arr, -N, axis=1)[:, -N:]

And for grabbing the items:

x = arr.shape[0]
arr[np.repeat(np.arange(x), N), indices.ravel()].reshape(x, N)

But note that this won't return a sorted result. In that case you can use np.argsort() along the intended axis:

indices = np.argsort(arr, axis=1)[:, -N:]

# Result
x = arr.shape[0]
arr[np.repeat(np.arange(x), N), indices.ravel()].reshape(x, N)

Here is an example:

In [42]: a = np.random.randint(0, 20, (10, 10))

In [44]: a
Out[44]:
array([[ 7, 11, 12,  0,  2,  3,  4, 10,  6, 10],
       [16, 16,  4,  3, 18,  5, 10,  4, 14,  9],
       [ 2,  9, 15, 12, 18,  3, 13, 11,  5, 10],
       [14,  0,  9, 11,  1,  4,  9, 19, 18, 12],
       [ 0, 10,  5, 15,  9, 18,  5,  2, 16, 19],
       [14, 19,  3, 11, 13, 11, 13, 11,  1, 14],
       [ 7, 15, 18,  6,  5, 13,  1,  7,  9, 19],
       [11, 17, 11, 16, 14,  3, 16,  1, 12, 19],
       [ 2,  4, 14,  8,  6,  9, 14,  9,  1,  5],
       [ 1, 10, 15,  0,  1,  9, 18,  2,  2, 12]])

In [45]: np.argpartition(a, np.argmin(a, axis=0))[:, 1:] # 1 is because the first item is the minimum one.
Out[45]:
array([[4, 5, 6, 8, 0, 7, 9, 1, 2],
       [2, 7, 5, 9, 6, 8, 1, 0, 4],
       [5, 8, 1, 9, 7, 3, 6, 2, 4],
       [4, 5, 2, 6, 3, 9, 0, 8, 7],
       [7, 2, 6, 4, 1, 3, 8, 5, 9],
       [2, 3, 5, 7, 6, 4, 0, 9, 1],
       [4, 3, 0, 7, 8, 5, 1, 2, 9],
       [5, 2, 0, 8, 4, 6, 3, 1, 9],
       [0, 1, 9, 4, 3, 7, 5, 2, 6],
       [0, 4, 7, 8, 5, 1, 9, 2, 6]])

In [46]: np.argpartition(a, np.argmin(a, axis=0))[:, -3:]
Out[46]:
array([[9, 1, 2],
       [1, 0, 4],
       [6, 2, 4],
       [0, 8, 7],
       [8, 5, 9],
       [0, 9, 1],
       [1, 2, 9],
       [3, 1, 9],
       [5, 2, 6],
       [9, 2, 6]])

In [89]: a[np.repeat(np.arange(x), 3), ind.ravel()].reshape(x, 3)
Out[89]:
array([[10, 11, 12],
       [16, 16, 18],
       [13, 15, 18],
       [14, 18, 19],
       [16, 18, 19],
       [14, 14, 19],
       [15, 18, 19],
       [16, 17, 19],
       [ 9, 14, 14],
       [12, 15, 18]])
4

This will be faster than a full sort depending on the size of your original array and the size of your selection:

>>> A = np.random.randint(0,10,10)
>>> A
array([5, 1, 5, 5, 2, 3, 2, 4, 1, 0])
>>> B = np.zeros(3, int)
>>> for i in xrange(3):
...     idx = np.argmax(A)
...     B[i]=idx; A[idx]=0 #something smaller than A.min()
...     
>>> B
array([0, 2, 3])

It, of course, involves tampering with your original array. Which you could fix (if needed) by making a copy or replacing back the original values. ...whichever is cheaper for your use case.

  • FWIW, your solution won't provide unambiguous solution in all situations. OP should describe how to handle these unambiguous cases. Thanks – eat Aug 2 '11 at 17:09
  • @eat The OP's question is a little ambiguous. An implementation, however, is not really open to interpretation. :) The OP should simply refer to the definition of np.argmax docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.argmax.html to be sure this specific solution meets the requirements. It's possible that any solution meeting the OP's stated reqirement is acceptable.. – Paul Aug 2 '11 at 18:05
  • Well, one might consider the implementation of argmax(.) to be unambiguous as well. (IMHO it tries to follow some kind of short circuiting logic, but unfortunately fails to provide universally acceptable behavior). Thanks – eat Aug 2 '11 at 18:50
3

Method np.argpartition only returns the k largest indices, performs a local sort, and is faster than np.argsort(performing a full sort) when array is quite large. But the returned indices are NOT in ascending/descending order. Let's say with an example:

Enter image description here

We can see that if you want a strict ascending order top k indices, np.argpartition won't return what you want.

Apart from doing a sort manually after np.argpartition, my solution is to use PyTorch, torch.topk, a tool for neural network construction, providing NumPy-like APIs with both CPU and GPU support. It's as fast as NumPy with MKL, and offers a GPU boost if you need large matrix/vector calculations.

Strict ascend/descend top k indices code will be:

Enter image description here

Note that torch.topk accepts a torch tensor, and returns both top k values and top k indices in type torch.Tensor. Similar with np, torch.topk also accepts an axis argument so that you can handle multi-dimensional arrays/tensors.

2

bottleneck has a partial sort function, if the expense of sorting the entire array just to get the N largest values is too great.

I know nothing about this module; I just googled numpy partial sort.

  • I find no partial sort function in bottleneck, there is a partition function, but this doesn't sort – nbecker Aug 15 at 14:05
2

Use:

from operator import itemgetter
from heapq import nlargest
result = nlargest(N, enumerate(your_list), itemgetter(1))

Now the result list would contain N tuples (index, value) where value is maximized.

2

Use:

def max_indices(arr, k):
    '''
    Returns the indices of the k first largest elements of arr
    (in descending order in values)
    '''
    assert k <= arr.size, 'k should be smaller or equal to the array size'
    arr_ = arr.astype(float)  # make a copy of arr
    max_idxs = []
    for _ in range(k):
        max_element = np.max(arr_)
        if np.isinf(max_element):
            break
        else:
            idx = np.where(arr_ == max_element)
        max_idxs.append(idx)
        arr_[idx] = -np.inf
    return max_idxs

It also works with 2D arrays. For example,

In [0]: A = np.array([[ 0.51845014,  0.72528114],
                     [ 0.88421561,  0.18798661],
                     [ 0.89832036,  0.19448609],
                     [ 0.89832036,  0.19448609]])
In [1]: max_indices(A, 8)
Out[1]:
    [(array([2, 3], dtype=int64), array([0, 0], dtype=int64)),
     (array([1], dtype=int64), array([0], dtype=int64)),
     (array([0], dtype=int64), array([1], dtype=int64)),
     (array([0], dtype=int64), array([0], dtype=int64)),
     (array([2, 3], dtype=int64), array([1, 1], dtype=int64)),
     (array([1], dtype=int64), array([1], dtype=int64))]

In [2]: A[max_indices(A, 8)[0]][0]
Out[2]: array([ 0.89832036])
  • Works good, but gives more results if you have duplicate (maximum) values in your array A. I would expect exactly k results but in case of duplicate values, you get more than k results. – Guido Feb 21 '18 at 12:53
  • I slightly modified the code. The list of indices that is returned has length equal exactly to k. If you have duplicates, they are grouped into a single tuple. – AndyK Feb 21 '18 at 16:04
1

The following is a very easy way to see the maximum elements and its positions. Here axis is the domain; axis = 0 means column wise maximum number and axis = 1 means row wise max number for the 2D case. And for higher dimensions it depends upon you.

M = np.random.random((3, 4))
print(M)
print(M.max(axis=1), M.argmax(axis=1))
0

I found it most intuitive to use np.unique.

The idea is, that the unique method returns the indices of the input values. Then from the max unique value and the indicies, the position of the original values can be recreated.

multi_max = [1,1,2,2,4,0,0,4]
uniques, idx = np.unique(multi_max, return_inverse=True)
print np.squeeze(np.argwhere(idx == np.argmax(uniques)))
>> [4 7]
0

I think the most time efficiency way is manually iterate through the array and keep a k-size min-heap, as other people have mentioned.

And I also come up with a brute force approach:

top_k_index_list = [ ]
for i in range(k):
    top_k_index_list.append(np.argmax(my_array))
    my_array[top_k_index_list[-1]] = -float('inf')

Set the largest element to a large negative value after you use argmax to get its index. And then the next call of argmax will return the second largest element. And you can log the original value of these elements and recover them if you want.

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