8

Let's say I have a type like:

type Person = {
  firstName: string;
  lastName: string;
  contact: {
    type: string;
    value: string;
  }[];
};

If I want the type of an element of the contact array, I can use an indexed access type like:

type Contact = User['contact'][number];

// same as type Contact = { type: string; value: string };

In essence, "the type at a numeric index of the contacts array", and would also work for a nested object.

However, if that is an optional parameter such as:

type Person = {
  firstName: string;
  lastName: string;
  contact?: {
    type: string;
    value: string;
  }[];
};

This (validly) reports an error of:

Type '{ type: string; value: string; }[] | undefined' has no matching index signature for type 'number'.ts(2537)

How can I "null check" within the type alias to get a nested type?

2 Answers 2

20

Update

NonNullable<T> will remove undefined and null from its type parameter.

type Contact = NonNullable<User['contact']> // almost the same as the next type, but also excludes `null` from the union.
type Contact = Exclude<User['contact'], undefined>[number];

https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/utility-types.html#nonnullabletype

Older answer

You can Exclude types when you need to drill down more.

type Contact = Exclude<User['contact'], undefined>[number];

The docs aren't particularly stable around the subject, but https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/utility-types.html is the current link.

2
  • Was afraid it would be something like this... Really wish we could use something like User['contact']![number]. Sep 9, 2021 at 0:29
  • @EricHaynes I think it'd be nice to allow both non-null assertions and ?. for type level drilling. There might already be an issue in Typescript's GitHub repo for it even.
    – wegry
    Sep 9, 2021 at 12:48
-1

Wouldn't be easier and more readable to just type contact separately?

type Person = {
  firstName: string;
  lastName: string;
  contact?: PersonContact[];
};

type PersonContact = {
  type: string;
  value: string;
};
1
  • 5
    It's not always a type you control. And frankly, no, turning structured data into a series of flat objects is far less readable. Being able to define a type that looks exactly like the data it describes is one of the more underrated features of Typescript. You don't have to hunt around in a bunch of different types to try to infer the actual shape. If the inner type is valid on its own, then promoting it to a first class type is valid. But e.g. if you only need to refer to it in some corner case of a builder function, preserving the model structure is preferable. Sep 9, 2021 at 0:06

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