2

I have this code:

class Employee:
    def __init__(self, name, pay, gender):
        self.name = name
        self.pay = pay
        self.gender = gender

    def add_raise(self):
        self.pay = int(self.pay*1.10)

    def __str__(self):
        if self.gender == "Female" or self.gender == "female":
            return f"{__class__.__name__} name: {self.name}, and she earns {self.pay} Pound"
        else:
            return f"{__class__.__name__} name: {self.name}, and he earns {self.pay} Pound"

    def __repr__(self):
        if self.gender == "Female" or self.gender == "female":
            return f"{__class__.__name__} name: {self.name}, and she earns {self.pay} Pound"
        else:
            return f"{__class__.__name__} name: {self.name}, and he earns {self.pay} Pound"

class Supervisor(Employee):
    def __init__(self, name, pay, gender, department):
        super().__init__(name, pay, gender)
        self.department = department

Now, when I try to run

emp1 = Employee("Ron", 1000, "male")
emp10 = Supervisor("Hermoine", 3000, "female", "General")
print(emp1, emp10)

I only get "Employee name" at the beginning. How do I change it so it reflects that "Hermoine" is a Supervisor and not just an Employee, without re-writing both the __str__ and __repr__ methods?

5
  • 2
    Honestly, I'd make the "role" explicit in an instance attribute, rather than trying to reuse the class name. Add self.role = "Employee or self.role = "Supervisor" in the appropriate __init__ methods.
    – chepner
    Sep 9 at 12:38
  • 1
    (Or a class attribute, role = "Employee" directly in the class statement namespace.)
    – chepner
    Sep 9 at 12:39
  • 1
    @chepner, the self.__class__.__name__ approach suggested by @U12-Forward is a pretty common pattern for __repr__ methods. See, for example, collections.OrderedDict, collections.Counter, collections.namedtuple and collections.ChainMap. github.com/python/cpython/blob/main/Lib/collections/__init__.py Sep 9 at 13:02
  • 1
    It's not one that I like, especially for str. It's fine for repr, which is only intended as a debugging tool anyway. For __str__, I'd rather use explicit data rather than a value inferred from code.
    – chepner
    Sep 9 at 13:04
  • 1
    Well, fair enough — but I think it's useful to note that it's arguably the norm in the standard library to define __repr__ methods like this, and to leave __str__ undefined (meaning that calls to __str__ will fall back to the __repr__ method). I'm also not entirely sure why you don't consider the class name to be explicit data — it's very rare that you're dynamically setting or modifying a class name at runtime. Sep 9 at 13:21
8

Solution:

Try changing your first class to:

class Employee:
    def __init__(self, name, pay, gender):
        self.name = name
        self.pay = pay
        self.gender = gender

    def add_raise(self):
        self.pay = int(self.pay*1.10)

    def __str__(self):
        if self.gender == "Female" or self.gender == "female":
            return f"{self.__class__.__name__} name: {self.name}, and she earns {self.pay} Pound"
        else:
            return f"{self.__class__.__name__} name: {self.name}, and he earns {self.pay} Pound"

    def __repr__(self):
        if self.gender == "Female" or self.gender == "female":
            return f"{self.__class__.__name__} name: {self.name}, and she earns {self.pay} Pound"
        else:
            return f"{self.__class__.__name__} name: {self.name}, and he earns {self.pay} Pound"

Try self.__class__.__name__ instead of __class__.__name__ in all strings.

And now:

emp1 = Employee("Ron", 1000, "male")
emp10 = Supervisor("Hermoine", 3000, "female", "General")
print(emp1, emp10)

Output:

Employee name: Ron, and he earns 1000 Pound Supervisor name: Hermoine, and she earns 3000 Pound

Explanation:

The reason why self returns the actual class name is because it will extract the class name from the current self instance. Without self would only get the class name of the original parent class, not the actual class it's currently in, that's the reason self is so important.

Also as @MadPhysicist mentioned, it's "because __class__ is lexically scoped at class execution time".

2
  • 4
    Because __class__ is lexically scooped at class execution time: i.e., it's a hard coded Emplpyee reference Sep 9 at 12:20
  • 1
    @MadPhysicist Ah yeah! added it into my answer, thanks for the suggestion! Sep 9 at 12:22

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