1

I have a Search component that implements a debounce timer so it doesn't call ValueChanged (and therefore doesn't update the property tied to it immediately).

My Issue

The bUnit test doesn't appear to two way bind my value I am updating.

Test code

private string StringProperty { get; set; }

[Fact]
public async Task AfterDebounce_ValueUpdates()
{
    var myString = "";
    var cut = RenderComponent<Search>(parameters => parameters
            .Add(p => p.Value, StringProperty)
            .Add(p => p.ValueChanged, (s) => myString = s)
        );

    var input = cut.Find("input");
    input.Input("unit test");

    Assert.Equal("unit test", cut.Instance.Value);
    Assert.NotEqual("unit test", myString);
    //Assert.NotEqual("unit test", StringProperty);

    await Task.Delay(5000);

    Assert.Equal("unit test", myString);
    //Assert.Equal("unit test", StringProperty);
}

I would have expected the commented out parts to work (as they are doing the same thing as the ValueChanged to update the property), but they fail.

The component

public class Search : ComponentBase
{    
    [Parameter] public string? Value { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public EventCallback<string> ValueChanged { get; set; }

    [DisallowNull] public ElementReference? Element { get; protected set; }

    private System.Timers.Timer timer = null;
    protected string? CurrentValue {
        get => Value;
        set {
            var hasChanged = !EqualityComparer<string>.Default.Equals(value, Value);
            if (hasChanged)
            {
                Value = value;

                DisposeTimer();
                timer = new System.Timers.Timer(350);
                timer.Elapsed += TimerElapsed_TickAsync;
                timer.Enabled = true;
                timer.Start();
            }
        }
    }

    private void DisposeTimer()
    {
        if (timer != null)
        {
            timer.Enabled = false;
            timer.Elapsed -= TimerElapsed_TickAsync;
            timer.Dispose();
            timer = null;
        }
    }

    private async void TimerElapsed_TickAsync(
        object sender,
        EventArgs e)
    {
        await ValueChanged.InvokeAsync(Value);
    }

    protected override void BuildRenderTree(RenderTreeBuilder builder)
    {
        builder.OpenElement(10, "input");
        builder.AddAttribute(20, "type", "text");
        builder.AddAttribute(60, "value", BindConverter.FormatValue(CurrentValue));
        builder.AddAttribute(70, "oninput", EventCallback.Factory.CreateBinder<string?>(this, __value => CurrentValue = __value, CurrentValue));
        builder.AddElementReferenceCapture(80, __inputReference => Element = __inputReference);
        builder.CloseElement();
    }
}

How it is used:

It may be used like this where the grid will update whenever Query is updated.

<Search @bind-Value=Query />
<Grid Query=@Query />

@code {
    private string? Query { get; set; }
}

This works fine in practice, but when testing I am having issues.

2

I tried locally on my machine, and the test passed.

Here is a simplified version of your component, that only calls TimerElapsed_TickAsync one time per value change and not every time the timer runs out (AutoReset defaults to true), and two different ways to write the test that both pass on my machine:

public class Search : ComponentBase, IDisposable
{
    private readonly Timer timer;

    [Parameter] public string? Value { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public EventCallback<string> ValueChanged { get; set; }
    [DisallowNull] public ElementReference? Element { get; protected set; }

    public Search()
    {
        timer = new Timer(350);
        timer.Elapsed += TimerElapsed_TickAsync;
        timer.Enabled = true;
        timer.AutoReset = false;
    }

    protected string? CurrentValue
    {
        get => Value;
        set
        {
            var hasChanged = !EqualityComparer<string>.Default.Equals(value, Value);
            if (hasChanged)
            {
                RestartTimer();
                Value = value;
            }
        }
    }

    private void RestartTimer()
    {
        if (timer.Enabled)
            timer.Stop();
        timer.Start();
    }

    private void TimerElapsed_TickAsync(object sender, EventArgs e) 
        => ValueChanged.InvokeAsync(Value);

    protected override void BuildRenderTree(RenderTreeBuilder builder)
    {
        builder.OpenElement(10, "input");
        builder.AddAttribute(20, "type", "text");
        builder.AddAttribute(60, "value", BindConverter.FormatValue(CurrentValue));
        builder.AddAttribute(70, "oninput", EventCallback.Factory.CreateBinder<string?>(this, __value => CurrentValue = __value, CurrentValue));
        builder.AddElementReferenceCapture(80, __inputReference => Element = __inputReference);
        builder.CloseElement();
    }

    public void Dispose() => timer.Dispose();
}

And the C# version of the test:

[Fact]
public async Task AfterDebounce_ValueUpdates()
{
    var expected = "test input";
    var count = 0;
    var value = "";
    var cut = RenderComponent<Search>(parameters => parameters
            .Add(p => p.Value, value)
            .Add(p => p.ValueChanged, (s) =>
            {
                value = s;
                count++;
            })
        );

    cut.Find("input").Input(expected);

    await Task.Delay(350);

    Assert.Equal(1, count);
    Assert.Equal(expected, value);
}

and the .razor version of the test (aka. written in a .razor file):

@inherits TestContext
@code
{
    [Fact]
    public async Task AfterDebounce_ValueUpdates()
    {
        var expected = "test input";
        var value = "";
        var cut = Render(@<Search @bind-Value="value" /> );

        cut.Find("input").Input(expected);

        await Task.Delay(350);

        Assert.Equal(expected, value);
    }
}
3
  • Hi @Egil (love the work you have done on Bunit). I understand the razor code test is working. However, with the C# version, you are wiring up the ValueChanged to that variable. I wouldn't think I would need to do that. I was merely showing in my example that by wiring up the ValueChanged I could get it to work. Shouldn't you just need .Add(p => p.Value, StringProperty) and then the commented code above would work?
    – thalacker
    Sep 13 at 14:13
  • In simpler words, do I need to provide a ValueChanged for it to work, or should it auto hook it up like it does in normal .razor?
    – thalacker
    Sep 13 at 14:15
  • You need to provide a ValueChanged callback. That is how you get notified of changes. It is also what the Blazor generator generates for you when you write @bind-Value in a Razor file. If you do not need to provide an initial value, passing a parameter to the Value parameter is not needed. Sep 14 at 15:05

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