69

What is the difference between these two ways of converting a string to System.Guid? Is there a reason to choose one over the other?

var myguid = Guid.Parse("9546482E-887A-4CAB-A403-AD9C326FFDA5");

or

var myguid = new Guid("9546482E-887A-4CAB-A403-AD9C326FFDA5");
  • 6
    in terms of what ? – raym0nd Aug 2 '11 at 17:25
  • 4
    You can also use : Guid.TryParse() – Patrick Desjardins Aug 2 '11 at 17:28
79

A quick look in the Reflector reveals that both are pretty much equivalent.

public Guid(string g)
{
    if (g == null)
    {
       throw new ArgumentNullException("g");
    }
    this = Empty;
    GuidResult result = new GuidResult();
    result.Init(GuidParseThrowStyle.All);
    if (!TryParseGuid(g, GuidStyles.Any, ref result))
    {
        throw result.GetGuidParseException();
    }
    this = result.parsedGuid;
}

public static Guid Parse(string input)
{
    if (input == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("input");
    }
    GuidResult result = new GuidResult();
    result.Init(GuidParseThrowStyle.AllButOverflow);
    if (!TryParseGuid(input, GuidStyles.Any, ref result))
    {
        throw result.GetGuidParseException();
    }
    return result.parsedGuid;
}
  • Thanks for the response. I was really looking for "is their a difference in how they work". – brennazoon Aug 2 '11 at 18:58
  • Looks like there's a clear difference in the GuidParseThrowStyle used, so one could throw an error for input that the other will not. – Triynko Feb 13 '17 at 17:12
  • 2
    @Triynko: If you look at the code, you will see that they both throw for the same causes. The only difference is that if an OverflowException is thrown it will be encapsulated in a FormatException in case of Guid.Parse. – Luca Cremonesi Oct 26 '17 at 16:25
23

Use the version that is the most readable to you. The two are implemented almost exactly the same way.

The only real difference is that the constructor initializes itself to Guid.Empty before attempting the parse. However, the effective code is identical.

That being said, if the Guid is coming from user input, then Guid.TryParse would be better than either option. If this Guid is hard coded, and always valid, either of the above are perfectly reasonable options.

10

I tried performance on one milion guids and Guid.Parse seems to be a insignificantly faster. It made 10-20 milisecods difference of 800 miliseconds of total creation on my PC.

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        const int iterations = 1000 * 1000;
        const string input = "63559BC0-1FEF-4158-968E-AE4B94974F8E";

        var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
        {
            new Guid(input);
        }
        sw.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine("new Guid(): {0} ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
        {
            Guid.Parse(input);
        }
        sw.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine("Guid.Parse(): {0} ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
}

And output:

new Guid(): 804 ms

Guid.Parse(): 791 ms

  • 2
    This isn't a statistically significant benchmark. I ran this multiple times and got varying results. The background noise clouds any possible performance differences in these implementations. – Brad M Jan 23 '19 at 21:27
1

I would go with TryParse. It doesn't throw an exception.

  • 28
    I would not consider that a reason as such. There are scenarios where you want an exception and scenarios where you don't. It's more a matter of choosing the appropriate method depending on the scenario. – Dirk Vollmar Aug 2 '11 at 17:33
  • +1 with a db that might have an empty string, this is an easy way to parse the guid and get Guid.Empty if the string is empty. – ashes999 Jan 6 '12 at 16:05
  • I also agree with @DirkVollmar that this is poor reasoning. Using TryParse all the time leads to massive problems and invalid code paths. It is preferred to use Parse when you know the value is supposed to be a Guid and fail fast if it isn't, than try to handle a completely invalid scenario and make your code more complex and fragile. – julealgon Dec 12 '18 at 20:24

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