3

I am working on application which processes large amount of text data gathering statistics on word occurrences (see: Source Code Word Cloud).

Here what the simplified core of my code is doing.

  1. Enumerate through all files with *.txt extension.
  2. Enumerate through words in each text files.
  3. Group by word and count occurrences.
  4. Sort by occurrences.
  5. Output top 20.

Everything worked fine with LINQ. Moving to PLINQ brought me significant performance boost. But ... cancelability during long running queries is lost.

It seems that the OrderBy Query is synchronizing data back into main thread and windows messages are not processed.

In the examle below I am demonstarting my implementation of cancelation according to MSDN How to: Cancel a PLINQ Query whic does not work :(

Any other ideas?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace PlinqCancelability
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            m_CancellationTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
        }

        private readonly CancellationTokenSource m_CancellationTokenSource;

        private void buttonStart_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            var result = Directory
                .EnumerateFiles(@"c:\temp", "*.txt", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
                .AsParallel()
                .WithCancellation(m_CancellationTokenSource.Token)
                .SelectMany(File.ReadLines)
                .SelectMany(ReadWords)
                .GroupBy(word => word, (word, words) => new Tuple<int, string>(words.Count(), word))
                .OrderByDescending(occurrencesWordPair => occurrencesWordPair.Item1)
                .Take(20);

            try
            {
                foreach (Tuple<int, string> tuple in result)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(tuple);
                }
            }
            catch (OperationCanceledException ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
            }
        }

        private void buttonCancel_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            m_CancellationTokenSource.Cancel();
        }

        private static IEnumerable<string> ReadWords(string line)
        {
            StringBuilder word = new StringBuilder();
            foreach (char ch in line)
            {
                if (char.IsLetter(ch))
                {
                    word.Append(ch);
                }
                else
                {
                    if (word.Length != 0) continue;
                    yield return word.ToString();
                    word.Clear();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
3

As Jon said, you'll need to start the PLINQ operation on a background thread. This way, the user interface doesn't hang while waiting until the operation completes (so the event handler for Cancel button can be invoked and the Cancel method of the cancellation token gets called). The PLINQ query cancels itself automatically when the token is cancelled, so you don't need to worry about that.

Here is one way to do this:

private void buttonStart_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  // Starts a task that runs the operation (on background thread)
  // Note: I added 'ToList' so that the result is actually evaluated
  // and all results are stored in an in-memory data structure.
  var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    Directory
        .EnumerateFiles(@"c:\temp", "*.txt", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
        .AsParallel()
        .WithCancellation(m_CancellationTokenSource.Token)
        .SelectMany(File.ReadLines)
        .SelectMany(ReadWords)
        .GroupBy(word => word, (word, words) => 
            new Tuple<int, string>(words.Count(), word))
        .OrderByDescending(occurrencesWordPair => occurrencesWordPair.Item1)
        .Take(20).ToList(), m_CancellationTokenSource.Token);

  // Specify what happens when the task completes
  // Use 'this.Invoke' to specify that the operation happens on GUI thread
  // (where you can safely access GUI elements of your WinForms app)
  task.ContinueWith(res => {
    this.Invoke(new Action(() => {
      try
      {
        foreach (Tuple<int, string> tuple in res.Result)
        {
          Console.WriteLine(tuple);
        }
      }
      catch (OperationCanceledException ex)
      {
          Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
      }
    }));
  });
}
  • @Jon Thanks for your answers. It would work, but code looks cluttered. One of the reasons using PLINQ was the abstraction from that threading staff. I'd like to wait for more elegant solution until accepting yours. – George Mamaladze Aug 2 '11 at 18:34
  • Thanks I have adapted this code with one correction. It is better to pass the same cancelation token to task. In this case you do not need to catch OperationCanceled exception inside the task. It would be enough to check .IsCanceled and .Exception properties on the task at the end. – George Mamaladze Aug 4 '11 at 18:06
1

You're currently iterating over the query results in the UI thread. Even though the query is executing in parallel, you're still iterating over the results in the UI thread. That means the UI thread is too busy performing computations (or waiting for the query to get results from its other threads) to respond to the click on the "Cancel" button.

You need to punt the work of iterating over the query results onto a background thread.

  • Ok, and how to invoke cancel in that another thread? It would be also too busy to accept cancel invocation, would not it? Too busy is not a correct answer. I have added 'Thread.Sleep(10);' to the 'ReadWords(string line)' method. It wont help. The main thread is just blocked waiting AsParallel threads to join back. – George Mamaladze Aug 2 '11 at 17:35
  • 1
    @gmamaladze: You can perform the cancellation from the UI thread - all you've got to do is make sure it's sufficiently un-busy to respond to clicks! – Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 17:37
  • @gmamaladze: Making the UI thread sleep still stops it from responding to events. You simply shouldn't perform long-running tasks in the UI thread. Again, the thread iterating over the query results doesn't have to "accept" the cancel invocation - it's not the same at all as responding to a click event. – Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 18:10
-1

I think I found some elegant solution, which fits better in LINQ / PLINQ concept.

I am declaring an extension method.

public static class ProcessWindowsMessagesExtension
{
    public static ParallelQuery<TSource> DoEvents<TSource>(this ParallelQuery<TSource> source)
    {
        return source.Select(
            item =>
            {
                Application.DoEvents();
                Thread.Yield();
                return item;
            });
    }
}

And than adding it to my query wherever I want to be responsive.

var result = Directory
            .EnumerateFiles(@"c:\temp", "*.txt", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
            .AsParallel()
            .WithCancellation(m_CancellationTokenSource.Token)
            .SelectMany(File.ReadLines)
            .DoEvents()
            .SelectMany(ReadWords)
            .GroupBy(word => word, (word, words) => new Tuple<int, string>(words.Count(), word))
            .OrderByDescending(occurrencesWordPair => occurrencesWordPair.Item1)
            .Take(20);

It works fine!

See my post on it for more info and source code to play with: “Cancel me if you can” or PLINQ cancelability & responsiveness in WinForms

  • Application.DoEvents() is rather poor way to improve application responsiveness. Even that it will work in lot of scenarios, it can get you in lot of trouble if your code is more complex (just search SO for it) – Andriy K Aug 21 '18 at 16:47

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