2

I have a Haskell program which accepts 2 or 3 Ints from the command line:

-- test.hs

main :: IO ()
main = do
    args <- fmap (read . head) getArgs
    case args of
        [x,y,a] -> doGeneration x y a
        [x,y]   -> doGeneration x y 10
        _       -> usage

However, when I run it with arguments:

$ ./test 100 200
divide: Prelude.read: no parse

Why?

1
  • 3
    For functions with a "polymorphic return type" like read it's good practice to specify the type you want to deserialize with visible TypeApplications: read @Int Sep 14 at 12:04
5

getArgs :: IO [String] returns a list of Strings, by taking the head and then args and it will then read that item.

You however never specified to what it should read, since you use args in a case … of … clause with [x,y,a] and [x, y], it will try to read it as a list of numbers (the type of the number is specified by the doGeneration signature. This thus means that you should write it as:

$ ./test [100,200]

But I think it makes not much sense to do that, you can rewrite the parsing part to:

main :: IO ()
main = do
    args <- fmap (map read) getArgs
    case args of
        [x,y,a] -> doGeneration x y a
        [x,y]   -> doGeneration x y 10
        _       -> usage

This means that it will read every parameter individually, and construct a list with the parsed items, and then we can pattern match on the parsed parts of the program parameters. In that case we thus can still use:

$ ./test 100 200
3
  • 1
    Thank you. It works perfectly and the map read part makes much more sense to me than read . head which i actually found on SO as accepted answer to similar question.
    – emesik
    Sep 14 at 12:19
  • "You however never specified to what it should render" is incorrect. the target type is known, and besides the error would talk about "ambiguous type" if it weren't known.
    – Will Ness
    Sep 14 at 12:29
  • 2
    When in IO, it's probably good to get into the habit of using readIO instead of read, as in args <- mapM readIO =<< getArgs. If somebody gives a non-integer argument, you'll find out right away, instead of at some time potentially after a lot of computation has already been done when the wrong argument is forced for the first time. Sep 14 at 18:26
0

Your running code is equivalent to

     ....
     case (read "100") of 
         [x,y,a :: Int] -> doGeneration x y a
         [x,y   :: Int] -> doGeneration x y 10
     ....

but reading a string "100" as a list of Ints is impossible, a.k.a. "there's no parse". That's why.

The Int comes from doGeneration's signature which you haven't included. But it must be a Num since you use a and 10 interchangeably.

It's better to use more variables in your do block instead of fmap, when you learn Haskell. It lessens the cognitive load and lets you see clearer what's going on:

main :: IO ()
main = do
    args <- getArgs           -- getArgs :: IO [String]
                              -- args    ::    [String]
    let arg1 = head args      -- arg1    ::     String
        val1 = read arg1
    case val1 of
        [x,y,a] -> doGeneration x y a
        [x,y]   -> doGeneration x y 10
        _       -> usage
1
  • I'd have never figured out that read expected [Int] here. Thank you!
    – emesik
    Sep 14 at 12:20

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