4

What I'd like to do is something like this where every time one of these print actions occurs it updates the counter to ensure that the next subsequent occurrence of a print action will always have the correct order in which it occurred among any of the possible print actions that may occur across multiple threads shown by the counter. The problem in my example is that if the IORef is read at the same time between threads then two or more print actions will have the same counter value. From what I've read it seems that using the Data.Atomics.Counter library would solve this problem but i am having a really hard time understanding how to use it do so. Can anyone show me an example or try to explain it to me please?

main = do
         myref <- newIORef 1 :: IO (IORef Int)
         void(forkIO (forever $ do ref <- readIORef myref
                                   print ("hi " ++ show (ref))
                                   modifyIORef myref (+1) ))
         void(forkIO (forever $ do ref <- readIORef myref
                                   print ("hey " ++ show (ref))
                                   modifyIORef myref (+1) ))
         forever $ do ref <- readIORef myref
                      print ("hello " ++ show (ref))
                      modifyIORef myref (+1) 
5

I would use an MVar for this.

inc mvar = forever $ do
    v <- takeMVar mvar
    print v
    putMVar mvar (v+1)

main = do
    mvar <- newMVar 1
    forkIO (inc mvar)
    forkIO (inc mvar)
    inc mvar

It is important that the print occur between takeMVar and putMVar, while the MVar is empty; otherwise another thread may empty the MVar and execute its print.

3
  • 1
    So I understand this a little better, you’re saying that in the event that (takeMVar mvar) occurs at the same time between threads one thread will always succeed in taking it while the other one will lock I’m guessing and have to wait for the thread that succeeded to refill the mvar with its increment?
    – Anon
    Sep 15 at 0:35
  • 1
    @Anon Yes, that's exactly correct. Sep 15 at 13:13
  • Thank you! I have implemented this in my program and it works perfectly.
    – Anon
    Sep 15 at 13:35
1

You could use atomicModifyIORef'. It would look something like:

increment ref = forever do
  val <- atomicModifyIORef' ref \old -> (old + 1, old)
  print val

main = do
  ref <- newIORef 0
  forkIO $ increment ref
  forkIO $ increment ref
  increment ref
4
  • Do you think there’s an advantage to using this method over @DanielWagner ’s answer?
    – Anon
    Sep 15 at 10:39
  • 2
    Be careful! This does not guarantee that the prints occur in order (and I have even observed them out of order to double-check before writing this comment). Sep 15 at 13:16
  • 1
    @Anon: If you don't care about the order of prints, just that "two or more print actions might have the same value", then they're equivalent. I thought atomic IORef operations might be faster than MVars, but a quick benchmark suggests that this is false for at least some cases. Overall, the MVar solution seems better.
    – jlwoodwa
    Sep 15 at 20:26
  • @jlwoodwa Thank you for clearing that up
    – Anon
    Sep 15 at 22:48

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