8

I recently upgraded my project to TypeScript 4.4.3 from 3.9.9.

My project's using "strictNullChecks": true, in its tsconfig.json, and runs in the browser, not server-side on Node.

In TypeScript 4.4.3, it seems like the type declarations for top has changed to WindowProxy | null (node_modules/typescript/lib/lib.dom.d.ts)

This means that I get the following error1 wherever I try to access properties of top2: TS Playground

const topUrl = top.window.location.href; // => Object is possibly 'null'.

How can I ignore this category of errors only for when top is possibly null?3


1 I understand that this error is warning me against the scenario where my website is loaded in an iframe, and therefore can't access top due to XSS. This isn't an issue because my 'X-Frame-Options' is set to 'sameorigin' and will therefore refuse to load my website in a cross-origin iframe.

2 I access properties of top because I use iframes inside my project a lot, where it loads sub-pages on the same domain.

3 I could use the following fixes to get around this Object is possibly 'null'., but I'd prefer not to, as my project is quite large and this fix would be tedious with minimal improvement.

let topUrl = top?.window.location.href || '';
let topUrl = '';
if (top) {
    topUrl = top.window.location.href;
}

I could also ignore these errors on every line with // @ts-ignore, but there's a lot of references to top and I don't want to clutter the project (also, other TypeScript errors on the same line would be ignored).

// @ts-ignore
const topUrl = top.window.location.href;
3
  • and this fix would be tedious with minimal improvement. Hrm, the code that you have there does sound like the right approach to me - a search-and-replace across files seems like it wouldn't be hard to accomplish. Is there something that makes it more tedious than that? Commented Sep 15, 2021 at 0:45
  • @CertainPerformance The project accesses many typed properties of classes on top, so the tedious part is setting || '' or || 0 or || false in each occurrence depending on how it's being used to not cause more errors. I just counted how many errors there are from this and it's around 1500, so I was looking for an easy way around to avoid/ignore this error 😅
    – Ethan
    Commented Sep 15, 2021 at 0:53
  • 2
    The thing is, you are upgrading major versions. According to SemVer, switching major versions lead to breaking changes. So if your code is not compatible with the version you either have to upgrade your code or downgrade the version. Ignoring errors is always a bad idea, because they usually have a meaning. Use vanilla js instead of ts if you don't want type errors Commented Oct 6, 2021 at 11:57

7 Answers 7

4
+200

I found a solution which would possibly fit your needs. And there are 2 versions of the solution you can take into consideration.

Both of these versions work by overriding the built-in lib-dom with a npm package @types/web which is also provided by Microsoft.

Beta but systematic one - Using the latest official 'lib override' from [email protected]

Follow steps below and things are gonna work as you expect without any other code modifications:

  1. Upgrade to TypeScript 4.5.0:
    npm i -D [email protected]
    
    or install globally
    npm i -g [email protected]
    
  2. Install the @types/[email protected] type package which has top: Window type
    npm i -D @typescript/lib-dom@npm:@types/[email protected]
    

I have made some simple tests on this solution and managed to get behaviour you want.

The only shortcoming of this solution is that [email protected] is still beta currently. But It worth your consideration since its final release will be just on next month.

TypeScript 4.5 Iteration Plan

Stable one - typescript 4.4.3 and switch the built-in dom lib.

  1. install @types/web

    npm i -D @types/[email protected]
    

    notice that the install command is different from the above one.

  2. Update your tsconfig.json. There are two cases to consider depending on if you have lib defined in your tsconfig.json or not.

    1. Without "lib" - You will need to add "lib": []. The value you want to add inside your lib should correlate to your "target". For example if you had "target": "es2017", then you would add "lib": ["es2017"]
    2. With "lib" - You should remove "dom".

The drawback of this second version of solution is, it cannot prevent your dependencies in node_modules from pulling in the TypeScript DOM library.

Please bear in mind that despite @types/web is up to version 0.0.40, only version 0.0.1 of @types/web has top typed top: Window instead of top: WindowProxy | null which is what you need.

3

The problem

You decided to upgrade your compiler version, and, as mentioned in a comment, major software version changes almost always come with breaking API changes.

The correct way to solve your issue (prevent compiler errors) is to modify your source code to satisfy the compiler. You said that modifying your source code in this way would be a chore, and asked about modifying the compiler configuration instead such that you can avoid modifying your source code.

It is not possible to override the types in lib.dom.d.ts in new type declarations. TypeScript will emit additional errors if you attempt to do this, even if you disable type-checking of your new declaration file, resulting in an incompatible merging of your new declarations. Your only option is to exclude the built-in DOM library and provide your own modified version of it.

Here is an overview of how to do that:

Starting TSConfig

You haven't provided your tsconfig.json file, so here's an example to use as a base, with the assumption that your source is organized in your repo's src/ directory:

Note: "strict": true implies "strictNullChecks": true

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "isolatedModules": true,
    "lib": [
      "esnext",
      "dom",
      "dom.iterable"
    ],
    "module": "esnext",
    "outDir": "dist",
    "strict": true,
    "target": "esnext"
  },
  "include": [
    "./src/**/*"
  ]
}

Creating the modified lib.dom.d.ts library

  1. First download the lib.dom.d.ts file from the tag that matches your TypeScript version (4.4.3): https://github.com/microsoft/TypeScript/blob/v4.4.3/lib/lib.dom.d.ts

  2. Move the file to src/types/lib.dom.d.ts in your project

  3. Remove the triple-slash reference on line 18 by deleting the entire line. (This will allow you to continue using other built-in libraries.)

  4. Modify line 17286 from this:

    readonly top: WindowProxy | null;
    

    to this:

    readonly top: WindowProxy;
    
  5. Modify line 18350 from this:

    declare var top: WindowProxy | null;
    

    to this:

    declare var top: WindowProxy;
    
  6. Save the file

Modifying your TSConfig

Now that you have a replacement library for the DOM types in your program, you need to tell the compiler to use it that way. Here's what you need to change:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    // ...
    "lib": [
      "esnext",
      "dom", // Delete this from the array
      "dom.iterable"
    ],
    // ...
    // Add this array property
    "typeRoots": [
      "./node_modules/@types",
      "./src/types"
    ]
  },
  // ...
}

So the modified tsconfig.json now looks like this:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "isolatedModules": true,
    "lib": [
      "esnext",
      "dom.iterable"
    ],
    "module": "esnext",
    "outDir": "dist",
    "strict": true,
    "target": "esnext",
    "typeRoots": [
      "./node_modules/@types",
      "./src/types"
    ]
  },
  "include": [
    "./src/**/*"
  ]
}

Conclusion

That's it. Now you should be able to compile your program and reference window.top or just the global top as a non-nullable value without a compiler error.

You'll need to repeat this process every time you upgrade TypeScript. Is this strategy more sustainable than modifying your source code? That's up to you.

3

I preface this answer with a strong warning that I would not do this to my project and encourage anyone in this position to fix the errors the proper way using null coalescing or not null assertion. EG:

window.top!.scrollTo()
top!.scrollTo()
window.top?.scrollTo()
top?.scrollTo()
// etc..

Even though theres 1500 I think using some regular expression you could easily target a large portion of those errors and fix with ease. With that said heres some other options:


I havent done this in a production project and might result in some other strange errors, its largely untested by myself outside of quick testing

The summary of this solution is you could clone the lib.dom.ts file and make the modifications by hand.

  1. Copy ./node_modules/typescript/lib/lib.dom.d.ts to somewhere in your project, say ./lib.dom.modified-4.4.3.d.ts
  2. Make the modifications to remove the null type from window.top and top types
    // old
    // readonly top: WindowProxy | null;
    // new
    readonly top: WindowProxy;
    
    ...
    
    // old
    // declare var top: WindowProxy | null;
    // new
    declare var top: WindowProxy;
    
  3. Update your tsconfig.json to remove dom as one of the libraries and add it to the list of types
{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "lib": [
      "ES6"
    ],
    "strictNullChecks": true,
    "module": "commonjs",
    "target": "ES6",
    "types": [
      "./lib.dom.modified-4.4.3"
    ]
  },
  "include": [
    "src/**/*"
  ]
}

Now you have a custom dom library with the top property not nullable


Alternatively you could make a patch for lib-dom using git and apply it post install. Details about how to do that are outlined in several solutions of this question How to overwrite incorrect TypeScript type definition installed via @types/package

2

You can initialize a VCS if you have not already done so. Then

  • look at the place of your error
  • see what you would need to replace it to
  • use whatever tools you use to replace all occurrences of the source text to the target text
  • if there are still errors, repeat

Once you have replaced all occurrences of issues this way, you will need to review your changes. You will find the changes via the VCS. If you use git, then the command is

git diff

See all the changes and whichever looks even a little bit suspect, investigate and see whether the automatic change was correct. If not, perform whatever you need to ensure that your code is correct.

Test everything. You would do well if you would create a separate versioning branch for this work which would be tested for a long time before it's being released to production.

2

instead that you shoud use !, that typescript ignores the fact that the value could be null which in your case it is not

const topUrl = top!.window.location.href;

if your ES-LINT complains on that you can set the in config file like that

module.exports = {
  ...
  rules: {
    ...
    '@typescript-eslint/no-non-null-assertion': 'off'
  },
  ...
}
3
  • If I do that ESLint complains ESLint: Forbidden non-null assertion.(@typescript-eslint/no-non-null-assertion)
    – Ethan
    Commented Oct 6, 2021 at 11:57
  • I added also ES-LINT config, code how to turn off that, if it isn't necessary for you
    – xhxe
    Commented Oct 6, 2021 at 12:00
  • Disabling the ESlint check would open a potential bug where a new or junior developer puts in a non-null assertion on some other variable that wasn't defined, and then cause a runtime error.
    – Ethan
    Commented Oct 6, 2021 at 12:03
2

I access properties of top because I use iframes inside my project a lot, where it loads sub-pages on the same domain.

top is potentially null...

This isn't an issue because my 'X-Frame-Options' is set to 'sameorigin' and will therefore refuse to load my website in a cross-origin iframe.

But you're saying that's impossible, in which case...

function getTop(): NonNullable<typeof top> {
    if (!top) throw new Error('global var top is null');
    return top;
}

...then replace any occurrence of top.example with getTop().example so as to centralize all potential 'null' errors.

While this isn't the most simple solution, it should be the safest.

1

In your question, you state:

I could use the following fixes to get around this Object is possibly 'null'., but I'd prefer not to, as my project is quite large and this fix would be tedious with minimal improvement.

let topUrl = top?.window.location.href || '';

I can appreciate the tedious nature of this task, but if you're insistent on using TypeScript, I must also be insistent that you employ this solution. It is necessary in TypeScript.

One way I would solve this problem would be to use my code editor/IDE program to search/replace all text references in my project. I use Visual Studio Code which allows me to Search and Replace specific text in my source files. It allows for Regex searching, including and excluding particular files. I'm certain that a great majority of code editors/IDEs have similar functionality.

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