252

I program in WPF C#. I have e.g. the following Path:

C:\Program Files\hello.txt

and I want to output "hello" from it.

The path is a string extract from database. Currently I'm using the following method (split from path by '\' then split again by a '.'):

string path = "C:\\Program Files\\hello.txt";
string[] pathArr = path.Split('\\');
string[] fileArr = pathArr.Last().Split('.');
string fileName = fileArr.Last().ToString();

It works, but I believe there should be shorter and smarter solution to that. Any idea?

  • In my system, Path.GetFileName("C:\\dev\\some\\path\\to\\file.cs") is returning the same string and not converting it to "file.cs" for some reason. If I copy/paste my code into an online compiler (like rextester.com), it works...? – jbyrd Feb 21 '18 at 21:35

10 Answers 10

487

Path.GetFileName

Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension

The Path class is wonderful.

81

try

fileName = Path.GetFileName (path);

http://msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/system.io.path.getfilename.aspx

29

try

System.IO.Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(path); 

demo

string fileName = @"C:\mydir\myfile.ext";
string path = @"C:\mydir\";
string result;

result = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fileName);
Console.WriteLine("GetFileNameWithoutExtension('{0}') returns '{1}'", 
    fileName, result);

result = Path.GetFileName(path);
Console.WriteLine("GetFileName('{0}') returns '{1}'", 
    path, result);

// This code produces output similar to the following:
//
// GetFileNameWithoutExtension('C:\mydir\myfile.ext') returns 'myfile'
// GetFileName('C:\mydir\') returns ''

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/system.io.path.getfilenamewithoutextension%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

  • It seems Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension() is not working with a file extension > 3 characters. – Nolmë Informatique Aug 19 '18 at 21:12
25

You can use Path API as follow:

 var filenNme = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension([File Path]);

More info: Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension

19
var fileNameWithoutExtension = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(path);

Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension

11

Try this:

string fileName = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(@"C:\Program Files\hello.txt");

This will return "hello" for fileName.

9
string Location = "C:\\Program Files\\hello.txt";

string FileName = Location.Substring(Location.LastIndexOf('\\') +
    1);
  • 1
    +1 since this might be Helpful in the case wherein this works as a Backup wherein the file name contains invalid characters [ <, > etc in Path.GetInvalidChars()]. – bhuvin Sep 8 '15 at 6:17
  • This is actually quite useful when working with path on UNIX ftp servers. – s952163 Jun 3 at 22:59
6

Try this,

string FilePath=@"C:\mydir\myfile.ext";
string Result=Path.GetFileName(FilePath);//With Extension
string Result=Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(FilePath);//Without Extension
  • 2
    So exactly like the highest voted answer says? – CodeCaster Jun 27 '17 at 7:44
  • 1
    You used the exact same methods as mentioned in the highest voted answer. – CodeCaster Jun 27 '17 at 12:39
1
Namespace: using System.IO;  
 //use this to get file name dynamically 
 string filelocation = Properties.Settings.Default.Filelocation;
//use this to get file name statically 
//string filelocation = @"D:\FileDirectory\";
string[] filesname = Directory.GetFiles(filelocation); //for multiple files

Your path configuration in App.config file if you are going to get file name dynamically  -

    <userSettings>
        <ConsoleApplication13.Properties.Settings>
          <setting name="Filelocation" serializeAs="String">
            <value>D:\\DeleteFileTest</value>
          </setting>
              </ConsoleApplication13.Properties.Settings>
      </userSettings>
1
string filepath = "C:\\Program Files\\example.txt";
FileVersionInfo myFileVersionInfo = FileVersionInfo.GetVersionInfo(filepath);
FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(filepath);
Console.WriteLine(fi.Name);

//input to the "fi" is a full path to the file from "filepath"
//This code will return the fileName from the given path

//output
//example.txt

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