How do you draw a circle using HTML5 and CSS3?

Is it also possible to put text inside?

16 Answers 16

up vote 160 down vote accepted

You can't draw a circle per se. But you can make something identical to a circle.

You'd have to create a rectangle with rounded corners (via border-radius) that are one-half the width/height of the circle you want to make.

    #circle {
      width: 50px;
      height: 50px;
      -webkit-border-radius: 25px;
      -moz-border-radius: 25px;
      border-radius: 25px;
      background: red;
    }
<div id="circle"></div>

  • 5
    On second thought, you may want to stick a &nbsp; inside that <div> to make sure it gets displayed. Otherwise, the browser might ignore it. – ryanoshea Aug 3 '11 at 5:06
  • 14
    I think this answer is wrong as it says you can't draw a circle in HTML5. Canvas is a HTML5 element though and you CAN draw a circle in HTML5 (w3schools.com/html/html5_canvas.asp) – jkj Jun 2 '13 at 22:23
  • 18
    use -webkit-border-radius: 100%; -moz-border-radius: 100%; border-radius: 100%; this way you need only to cusomize width and height to apply your changes in future – Arkady Oct 1 '13 at 12:30
  • 3
    you have to add border to make it visible. – hakan Jun 16 '14 at 8:59
  • 2
    I found using border-radius: 50%; worked well, change the size as desired. For colour you can use background-color or border. – Grimeh Jan 7 '15 at 0:41

It is quite possible in HTML 5. Your options are: Embedded SVG and <canvas> tag.

To draw circle in embedded SVG:

<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
    <circle cx="50" cy="50" r="50" fill="red" />
</svg>

Circle in <canvas>:

var canvas = document.getElementById("circlecanvas");
var context = canvas.getContext("2d");
context.arc(50, 50, 50, 0, Math.PI * 2, false);
context.fillStyle = "red";
context.fill()
<canvas id="circlecanvas" width="100" height="100"></canvas>

There are a few unicode circles you could use:

* { font-size: 50px; }
&#x25CB;
&#x25CC;
&#x25CD;
&#x25CE;
&#x25CF;

More shapes here.

You can overlay text on the circles if you want to:

#container {
    position: relative;
}
#circle {
  font-size: 50px;
  color: #58f;
}
#text {
    z-index: 1;
    position: absolute;
    top: 21px;
    left: 11px;
}
<div id="container">
    <div id="circle">&#x25CF;</div>
    <div id="text">a</div>
</div>

You could also use a custom font (like this one) if you want to have a higher chance of it looking the same on different systems since not all computers/browsers have the same fonts installed.

border-radius:50% if you want the circle to adjust to whatever dimensions the container gets (e.g. if the text is variable length)

Don't forget the -moz- and -webkit- prefixes!

  • 1
    You have to make sure both width and height are equal, otherwise it will create an oval. – Hp93 Jun 7 '16 at 7:45

As of 2015, you can make it and center the text with as few as 15 lines of CSS (Fiddle):

body {
  background-color: #fff;
}
#circle {
  position: relative;
  background-color: #09f;
  margin: 20px auto;
  width: 400px;
  height: 400px;
  border-radius: 200px;
}
#text {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  color: #fff;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">

<head>
  <meta charset="UTF-8">
  <title>circle with text</title>

</head>

<body>
  <div id="circle">
    <div id="text">Text in the circle</div>
  </div>
</body>

</html>

Without any -webkit-s, this works on IE11, Firefox, Chrome and Opera, on Windows7, and it is valid HTML5 (experimental) and CSS3.

You can use the border-radius attribute to give it a border-radius equivalent to the element's border-radius. For example:

<div style="border-radius 10px; -moz-border-radius 10px; -webkit-border-radius 10px; width: 20px; height: 20px; background: red; border: solid black 1px;">&nbsp;</div>

(The reason for using the -moz and -webkit extensions is to support pre-CSS3-final versions of Gecko and Webkit.)

There are more examples on this page. As far as inserting text, you can do it but you have to be mindful of the positioning, as most browsers' box padding model still uses the outer square.

There is not technically a way to draw a circle with HTML (there isn’t a <circle> HTML tag), but a circle can be drawn.

The best way to draw one is to add border-radius: 50% to a tag such as div. Here’s an example:

<div style="width: 50px; height: 50px; border-radius: 50%;">You can put text in here.....</div>

You can use border-radius property, or make a div with fixed height and width and a background with png circle.

.circle{
    height: 65px;
    width: 65px;
    border-radius: 50%;
    border:1px solid red;
    line-height: 65px;
    text-align: center;
}
<div class="circle"><span>text</span></div>

Simply do the following in the script tags:

<!Doctype html>
<html>
<head>
	<title>Circle Canvas</title>
</head>
<body>
	<canvas id="myCanvas" width="300" height="150" style="border:1px solid 
#d3d3d3;">
	<body>
		<script>
			var c = document.getElementById("myCanvas");
			var ctx = c.getContext("2d");
			ctx.beginPath();
			ctx.arc(100, 75, 50, 0, 2 * Math.PI);
			ctx.stroke();
		</script>
    </body>
</body>
</html>

And there you go you got your circle.

  • Which language is this supposed to be? The OP asked about HTML5 and CSS3. – Claus Wilke Dec 19 '17 at 6:15
  • This can be done in html using the script tags i think i mentioned in the first line @ClausWilke – Dan Dec 19 '17 at 6:39
  • Please provide a complete example then that shows how you use this inside an HTML document. See this answer for an example of what a complete example looks like. – Claus Wilke Dec 19 '17 at 6:44
  • I think that should help what you were not able to understand if you want i can add a pic of the result how the circle looks like. . . – Dan Dec 19 '17 at 6:53
  • Not necessay. I put it into a code snippet. It runs when you click the button. – Claus Wilke Dec 19 '17 at 7:26
.at-counter-box {
    border: 2px solid #1ac6ff;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    border-radius: 100px;
    font-family: 'Oswald Sans', sans-serif;
    color:#000;
}
.at-counter-box-content {
    position: relative;
}
.at-counter-content span {
    font-size: 40px;
    font-weight: bold ;
    text-align: center;
    position: relative;
    top: 55px;
}

  1. h1 {
    border: dashed 2px blue;
      width: 200px;
      height: 200px;
      border-radius: 100px;
      text-align: center;
      line-height: 60px;
      
    }
    <h1> <br>hello world</h1>

    #

   <head>
       <style>

       #circle{
       width:200px;
       height:200px;
       border-radius:100px;
       background-color:red;
       }
       </style>
   </head>

    <body>
       <div id="circle"></div>
   </body>

simple and novice :)

border-radius: 50%; will turn all elements into a circle, regardless of size. At least, as long as the height and width of the target are the same, otherwise it will turn into an oval.

#target{
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: #aaa;
    border-radius: 50%;
}
<div id="target"></div>

Note: browser prefixes are not needed anymore for border-radius


Alternatively, you can use clip-path: circle(); to turn an element into a circle as well. Even if the element has a greater width than height (or the other way around), it will still become a circle, and not an oval.

#target{
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: #aaa;
    clip-path: circle();
}
<div id="target"></div>

In fact, you can use clip-path to turn elements into all kinds of shapes

Note: clip-path is not (yet) supported by all browsers


You can place text inside of the circle, simply by writing the text inside of the tags of the target,
like so:

<div>text</div>

If you want to center text in the circle, you can do the following:

#target{
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: #aaa;
    border-radius: 50%;

    display: flex;
    align-items: center;
}

#text{
    width: 100%;
    text-align: center;
}
<div id="target">
    <div id="text">text</div>
</div>

<div class="at-counter-box-content">

  <div class="at-counter-content">

      <span>40%</span>

  </div><!--at-counter-content-->

</div><!--at-counter-box-content-->

  • 3
    Although this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how it answers the question would significantly improve its long-term value. Please edit your answer to add some explanation. – Toby Speight May 31 '16 at 12:04

If you're using sass to write your CSS you can do:

@mixin draw_circle($radius){
  width: $radius*2;
  height: $radius*2;
  -webkit-border-radius: $radius;
  -moz-border-radius: $radius;
  border-radius: $radius;
}

.my-circle {
  @include draw_circle(25px);
  background-color: red;
}

Which outputs:

.my-circle {
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 25px;
  -moz-border-radius: 25px;
  border-radius: 25px;
  background-color: red;
}

Try it here: https://www.sassmeister.com/

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