8

I have 2 2D-arrays. I am trying to convolve along the axis 1. np.convolve doesn't provide the axis argument. The answer here, convolves 1 2D-array with a 1D array using np.apply_along_axis. But it cannot be directly applied to my use case. The question here doesn't have an answer.

MWE is as follows.

import numpy as np

a = np.random.randint(0, 5, (2, 5))
"""
a=
array([[4, 2, 0, 4, 3],
       [2, 2, 2, 3, 1]])
"""
b = np.random.randint(0, 5, (2, 2))
"""
b=
array([[4, 3],
       [4, 0]])
"""

# What I want
c = np.convolve(a, b, axis=1)  # axis is not supported as an argument
"""
c=
array([[16, 20,  6, 16, 24,  9],
       [ 8,  8,  8, 12,  4,  0]])
"""

I know I can do it using np.fft.fft, but it seems like an unnecessary step to get a simple thing done. Is there a simple way to do this? Thanks.

0

Why not just do a list comprehension with zip?

>>> np.array([np.convolve(x, y) for x, y in zip(a, b)])
array([[16, 20,  6, 16, 24,  9],
       [ 8,  8,  8, 12,  4,  0]])
>>> 

Or with scipy.signal.convolve2d:

>>> from scipy.signal import convolve2d
>>> convolve2d(a, b)[[0, 2]]
array([[16, 20,  6, 16, 24,  9],
       [ 8,  8,  8, 12,  4,  0]])
>>> 
1
  • 2
    list comprehension with zip won't work when there are 3 dimensional arrays and 1d convolution is needed. Two loops will be needed. Similar problem with convolve2d. You're using some hacks for the example the OP has given, but I think this is a useful question and a generic answer would be much more beneficial to the community. Sep 17 at 8:17
0

One possibility could be to manually go the way to the Fourier spectrum, and back:

n = np.max([a.shape, b.shape]) + 1
np.abs(np.fft.ifft(np.fft.fft(a, n=n) * np.fft.fft(b, n=n))).astype(int)
# array([[16, 20,  6, 16, 24,  9],
#        [ 8,  8,  8, 12,  4,  0]])
5
  • 1
    Hi I have already mentioned fft method is a bit roundabout. I was looking to do it all in time-domain.
    – learner
    Sep 17 at 10:32
  • Keep in mind that, depending on the length of the signal, going the FFT route may also be the fastest. Sep 17 at 10:50
  • Can you please specify how the speed varies length of the signal? Would be better if you point to a resource regarding this. Thanks! Sep 17 at 11:01
  • @NilsWerner I guess you are mentioning that fft implementation is efficient when the length is a power of 2? But that is a special case and I would like to have a general solution. Also the value of n should be a.shape[1]+b.shape[1]-1.
    – learner
    Sep 17 at 11:11
  • The complexity differences between naive convolution and FFT are well known. And you can always pad your signal so its length is a power of 2. Sep 17 at 11:22

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