-1

this is for the question on LC - remove nth node from the end.

when i run this code

 ListNode *dummy = new ListNode(0);
    dummy -> next = head;
    ListNode *fast = dummy;
    ListNode *slow = dummy;

    for (int i = 0; i <= n ; i++){
        fast = fast -> next;
    }

    while (fast && slow){
        fast = fast -> next;
        slow = slow -> next;
    }
    slow -> next = slow -> next -> next;
    return dummy -> next;
        
    }

the code runs fine due to the first line - but my initial approach was the one below, where i assigned the pointer to 0, just to create a dummy node. why doesn't it have the same effect?


 ListNode *dummy (0);
    dummy -> next = head;
    ListNode *fast = dummy;
    ListNode *slow = dummy;

    for (int i = 0; i <= n ; i++){
        fast = fast -> next;
    }

    while (fast && slow){
        fast = fast -> next;
        slow = slow -> next;
    }
    slow -> next = slow -> next -> next;
    return dummy -> next;
        
    }

could someone please clear up the difference between these two pieces of code for me?

note: also here are the relevant constructors...

/**
 * Definition for singly-linked list.
 * struct ListNode {
 *     int val;
 *     ListNode *next;
 *     ListNode() : val(0), next(nullptr) {}
 *     ListNode(int x) : val(x), next(nullptr) {}
 *     ListNode(int x, ListNode *next) : val(x), next(next) {}
 * };
 */
6
  • You cannot say dummy -> next if dummy is a null pointer. Sep 17 at 19:30
  • In the second one, you'll deference an invalid pointer the first iteration of your for loop. You have a leak in the first version btw, and you shouldn't need to allocate any memory to implement this function. Sep 17 at 19:30
  • how would you do this question to avoid leaks? and why is there a leak? Sep 17 at 19:32
  • I think this code has multiple different problems. The return of dummy->next is fishy too. From that final return statement, it seems this is part of a function, hence what you are doing to the local variables fast and slow never has any effect anywhere. You might want to explain what this is supposed to do if you want a more elaborate answer.
    – Banana
    Sep 17 at 19:46
  • Local variable ListNode *dummy = new ListNode(0); New node allocated to dummy. dummy is assigned to local variables fast` and slow which are also are updated to point away from dummy's allocation fairly quickly leaving dummy as the sole pointer. Ultimately dummy->next is returned, dummy goes out of scope and the ListNode is lost, floating through vast emptiness until the program exits and the OS finally releases it. Every time the function is called another ListNode is allocated and lost. Thing is, you don't need the allocation at all. This is an unforced error. Sep 17 at 19:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.