1

I see lots of answers about formatting floating numbers in Python 3 with a limited number of decimal places, e.g.:

>>> "{:.4f}".format(3.14159265359)
'3.1416'

But this formatting will keep redundant trailing 0's:

>>> "{:.4f}".format(3/4)
'0.7500'

What I'd like to have is to drop the trailing zeroes in a nice way:

>>> "{:.4f??}".format(3/4)
'0.75'

Using the g format seems to get closer to this, but it counts the digits BEFORE the decimal as part of the total field width, e.g.:

>>> "{:.4g}".format(3/4)
'0.75'

is perfect, but:

>>> "{:.4g}".format(3.14159265359)
'3.142'

instead of the desired 3.1416

To clarify, whole numbers (e.g. 0 alone) shouldn't have a decimal at all.

Is this possible with format alone, or do I have to resort to dropping the trailing zeroes through string manipulation on the formatted number?

The documentation page I studied (besides searching the web): https://docs.python.org/3/library/string.html#formatspec

3
  • So you want whole numbers?
    – anarchy
    Sep 19 at 7:00
  • @anarchy I want whole numbers to drop the decimal completely, but if a number has a fraction then show it up to 4 digits after the decimal (which is what .4f would give me) but without trailing zeroes (.4f would pad with zeroes if there aren't enough digits after the decimal). Sep 19 at 7:02
  • look at my answer using ints will that work?
    – anarchy
    Sep 19 at 7:03
2

To convert a float to a string that has at most N digits after the decimal point, but does not include trailing 0's, you can use round() and then convert to a string.

>>> str(round(3.14159265359, 4))
'3.1416'
>>> str(round(3/4, 4))
'0.75'
>>> str(round(17, 4))
'17'
2
  • 1
    This will not work for 17.0
    – ThePyGuy
    Sep 19 at 7:22
  • @ThePyGuy you are right :( Looks like I'm back to .rstrip on the result of round. Sep 19 at 9:17
1

I am not sure if this is possible with bare string formatting, but you could do:

>>> a = 3/ 4
>>> "{:.{a}f}".format(a, a=min(len(str(a).split('.')[-1]), 4))
'0.75'
>>> a = 3.14159265359
>>> "{:.{a}f}".format(a, a=min(len(str(a).split('.')[-1]), 4))
'3.1416'
>>> 

Or why not rstrip:

>>> a = 3 / 4
>>> "{:.4f}".format(a).rstrip("0")
'0.75'
>>> a = 3.14159265359
>>> "{:.4f}".format(a).rstrip("0")
'3.1416'
>>> 

Numpy can do this better:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> np.format_float_positional(0.75, 4)
'0.75'
>>> np.format_float_positional(np.pi, 4)
'3.1416'
>>> 
0

One way I found after posting is:

print('{:.4f}.format(a).rstrip('.0') or '0')

I still wonder if it's possible more elegantly.

2
  • 1
    rstrip('.0') would change "5500.00" to "55". I think instead you want .rstrip('0').rstrip('.').
    – khelwood
    Sep 19 at 7:07
  • I added one numpy solution, which is the best I guess. Sep 19 at 7:10
0

You can use round function to do this work. round function takes two parameters. First one is the floating number that you want to round off and second one is the number of places after decimal you want.

a=10/3
print(round(a,4))

This will return 3.3333.

a=3/4
print(round(a,4))

This will return 0.75.

Thnaks

0

What you are looking for is round, and for that whole number condition, you can use float.is_integer :

def func(x, digits):
    x = round(x, digits)
    return int(x) if float.is_integer(x) else x

SAMPLE RUN

>>> func(3.14159265359, 4)
3.1416
>>> func(3.14000022, 4)
3.14
>>> func(3.000022, 4)
3

PS: You can convert the return values to string type, if needed.

1
  • Instead of float.is_integer(x) you could do x.is_integer() as well :) Sep 19 at 7:31

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