70

I am wondering if there is a method or format string I'm missing in .NET to convert the following:

   1 to 1st
   2 to 2nd
   3 to 3rd
   4 to 4th
  11 to 11th
 101 to 101st
 111 to 111th

This link has a bad example of the basic principle involved in writing your own function, but I am more curious if there is an inbuilt capacity I'm missing.

Solution

Scott Hanselman's answer is the accepted one because it answers the question directly.

For a solution however, see this great answer.

2

11 Answers 11

87

It's a function which is a lot simpler than you think. Though there might be a .NET function already in existence for this, the following function (written in PHP) does the job. It shouldn't be too hard to port it over.

function ordinal($num) {
    $ones = $num % 10;
    $tens = floor($num / 10) % 10;
    if ($tens == 1) {
        $suff = "th";
    } else {
        switch ($ones) {
            case 1 : $suff = "st"; break;
            case 2 : $suff = "nd"; break;
            case 3 : $suff = "rd"; break;
            default : $suff = "th";
        }
    }
    return $num . $suff;
}
7
  • 3
    What about localization?
    – macbirdie
    Sep 16, 2008 at 21:26
  • 2
    Localization will mean that you have to create separate functions for each language. In german, you could just append "ter", but "1ter" "2ter" "3ter" looks really bad even though it's grammatically correct. In french, it's a bit better, but there is no universal way for every language.
    – Michael Stum
    Sep 17, 2008 at 9:14
  • 3
    @MichaelStum: Actually in german you could NOT just add "ter". Consider "Heute ist der 1te Januar" (today is 1st of January). Or "Klicken Sie den 5ten Button" (click the 5th button). Just to name two of dozens of cases. You have to consider the proper Flexion (engl. inflection) for every single use.
    – Regexident
    Jan 26, 2012 at 13:04
  • 1
    Combining a number and such a suffix is unusual in German. You either write it as "1." or "erster"/"erste". The latter is generally used is texts and rarely needs to be generated automatically. Jun 6, 2014 at 10:03
  • 1
    @dannio Nope, there's a condition for $tens
    – Rufus L
    Nov 13, 2019 at 21:23
78

Simple, clean, quick

    private static string GetOrdinalSuffix(int num)
    {
        string number = num.ToString();
        if (number.EndsWith("11")) return "th";
        if (number.EndsWith("12")) return "th";
        if (number.EndsWith("13")) return "th";
        if (number.EndsWith("1")) return "st";
        if (number.EndsWith("2")) return "nd";
        if (number.EndsWith("3")) return "rd";
        return "th";
    }

Or better yet, as an extension method

public static class IntegerExtensions
{
    public static string DisplayWithSuffix(this int num)
    {
        string number = num.ToString();
        if (number.EndsWith("11")) return number + "th";
        if (number.EndsWith("12")) return number + "th";
        if (number.EndsWith("13")) return number + "th";
        if (number.EndsWith("1")) return number + "st";
        if (number.EndsWith("2")) return number + "nd";
        if (number.EndsWith("3")) return number + "rd";
        return number + "th";
    }
}

Now you can just call

int a = 1;
a.DisplayWithSuffix(); 

or even as direct as

1.DisplayWithSuffix();
7
  • 2
    Probably the neatest answer here. Oct 24, 2013 at 4:36
  • 2
    I think this is the cleanest way to do it
    – Serj Sagan
    Apr 30, 2014 at 0:59
  • 2
    Hands down best answer. This actually relies on number as text, rather than trying to use some complicated mathematical formula. This is exactly how the human brain itself would figure it out, and that's ideal. Sep 12, 2014 at 15:19
  • 1
    This is a good answer but if the method is called DisplayWithSuffix then the returned answer should include the number so 1 would return "1st" not just "st". Oct 22, 2014 at 17:38
  • 3
    You probably want to put num.ToString() into a variable. Not sure how anyone would consider this answer either simple, clean or quick to be honest.
    – Rudey
    Dec 8, 2018 at 19:50
59

No, there is no inbuilt capability in the .NET Base Class Library.

2
  • 8
    This is a late comment, but is there any plans to add this capability to the .NET BCL to format dates? May 19, 2013 at 16:09
  • 5
    How about now, 2019?
    – Imad
    Apr 4, 2019 at 7:23
55

@nickf: Here is the PHP function in C#:

public static string Ordinal(int number)
{
    string suffix = String.Empty;

    int ones = number % 10;
    int tens = (int)Math.Floor(number / 10M) % 10;

    if (tens == 1)
    {
        suffix = "th";
    }
    else
    {
        switch (ones)
        {
            case 1:
                suffix = "st";
                break;

            case 2:
                suffix = "nd";
                break;

            case 3:
                suffix = "rd";
                break;

            default:
                suffix = "th";
                break;
        }
    }
    return String.Format("{0}{1}", number, suffix);
}
4
  • Ha thanks, just about to post the code I wrote out. Yours beats mine anyway with the String.Format bit I think. Sep 16, 2008 at 4:21
  • 1) Why the conversion to decimal? A simple (number / 10) % 10 does the trick. 2) Why do you initialize suffix to a value that will never be used? Jun 6, 2014 at 10:05
  • @CodesInChaos: Without the conversion to decimal, you get a compiler error: The call is ambiguous between the following methods or properties: 'System.Math.Floor(decimal)' and 'System.Math.Floor(double)'. Initializing suffix to String.Empty is mostly habit but also helps to avoid accidental Use of unassigned local variable 'suffix' errors. Jun 6, 2014 at 12:58
  • 1
    @ScottDorman 1) Only if you leave in the call to Floor which is nonsensical on integers. Integer division simply truncates towards zero, no need for casting to decimal or using Floor. (number / 10) % 10 is simpler and works. 2) Those errors occur if you overlooked a code path. A compiler error tells you to fix that mistake instead of silently returning a useless value. Jun 6, 2014 at 13:05
13

This has already been covered but I'm unsure how to link to it. Here is the code snippit:

    public static string Ordinal(this int number)
    {
        var ones = number % 10;
        var tens = Math.Floor (number / 10f) % 10;
        if (tens == 1)
        {
            return number + "th";
        }

        switch (ones)
        {
            case 1: return number + "st";
            case 2: return number + "nd";
            case 3: return number + "rd";
            default: return number + "th";
        }
    }

FYI: This is as an extension method. If your .NET version is less than 3.5 just remove the this keyword

[EDIT]: Thanks for pointing that it was incorrect, that's what you get for copy / pasting code :)

6
  • 4
    Doesn't work. 1011 % 10 == 1. 1011st is incorrect. Sep 16, 2008 at 4:00
  • 8
    I like how you declare the ones variable and never use it. May 8, 2009 at 20:14
  • @MattMitchell In your example, it would be 10110th not 1011st
    – eoleary
    Apr 30, 2013 at 15:03
  • @EOLeary not sure what you're saying, but I think Marshall's edit catered for my example. Apr 30, 2013 at 15:49
  • 1
    Why the use of float instead of plain integers? I'd use (number / 10) % 10. Jun 6, 2014 at 10:06
9

Here's a Microsoft SQL Server Function version:

CREATE FUNCTION [Internal].[GetNumberAsOrdinalString]
(
    @num int
)
RETURNS nvarchar(max)
AS
BEGIN

    DECLARE @Suffix nvarchar(2);
    DECLARE @Ones int;  
    DECLARE @Tens int;

    SET @Ones = @num % 10;
    SET @Tens = FLOOR(@num / 10) % 10;

    IF @Tens = 1
    BEGIN
        SET @Suffix = 'th';
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN

    SET @Suffix = 
        CASE @Ones
            WHEN 1 THEN 'st'
            WHEN 2 THEN 'nd'
            WHEN 3 THEN 'rd'
            ELSE 'th'
        END
    END

    RETURN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), @num) + @Suffix;
END
3
  • I just wrote that function almost verbatim! Differences: master db, cast instead of convert, and I use slightly different indenting. Great minds, I guess... May 8, 2009 at 20:21
  • +1 - Just had the need for a SQL version - saved me writing one
    – HeavenCore
    Apr 26, 2012 at 14:15
  • Superb, but only if we are fetching from SQL. But in this case I am formatting a .net DateTime variable. But this function will be immensely useful. Jun 27, 2014 at 4:45
2

I know this isn't an answer to the OP's question, but because I found it useful to lift the SQL Server function from this thread, here is a Delphi (Pascal) equivalent:

function OrdinalNumberSuffix(const ANumber: integer): string;
begin
  Result := IntToStr(ANumber);
  if(((Abs(ANumber) div 10) mod 10) = 1) then // Tens = 1
    Result := Result + 'th'
  else
    case(Abs(ANumber) mod 10) of
      1: Result := Result + 'st';
      2: Result := Result + 'nd';
      3: Result := Result + 'rd';
      else
        Result := Result + 'th';
    end;
end;

Does ..., -1st, 0th make sense?

0
1

Another flavor:

/// <summary>
/// Extension methods for numbers
/// </summary>
public static class NumericExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Adds the ordinal indicator to an integer
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="number">The number</param>
    /// <returns>The formatted number</returns>
    public static string ToOrdinalString(this int number)
    {
        // Numbers in the teens always end with "th"

        if((number % 100 > 10 && number % 100 < 20))
            return number + "th";
        else
        {
            // Check remainder

            switch(number % 10)
            {
                case 1:
                    return number + "st";

                case 2:
                    return number + "nd";

                case 3:
                    return number + "rd";

                default:
                    return number + "th";
            }
        }
    }
}
1
  • Actually a good answer. But it is generic, i.e not specific to dates of a month. I meant only dates. So above 100 may be not applicable. Jun 27, 2014 at 4:44
0
public static string OrdinalSuffix(int ordinal)
{
    //Because negatives won't work with modular division as expected:
    var abs = Math.Abs(ordinal); 

    var lastdigit = abs % 10; 

    return 
        //Catch 60% of cases (to infinity) in the first conditional:
        lastdigit > 3 || lastdigit == 0 || (abs % 100) - lastdigit == 10 ? "th" 
            : lastdigit == 1 ? "st" 
            : lastdigit == 2 ? "nd" 
            : "rd";
}
-3
else if (choice=='q')
{
    qtr++;

    switch (qtr)
    {
        case(2): strcpy(qtrs,"nd");break;
        case(3):
        {
           strcpy(qtrs,"rd");
           cout<<"End of First Half!!!";
           cout<<" hteam "<<"["<<hteam<<"] "<<hs;
           cout<<" vteam "<<" ["<<vteam;
           cout<<"] ";
           cout<<vs;dwn=1;yd=10;

           if (beginp=='H') team='V';
           else             team='H';
           break;
       }
       case(4): strcpy(qtrs,"th");break;
1
  • 3
    come on. what are you writing? It has nothing to do with my question. Jun 27, 2014 at 4:42
-6

I think the ordinal suffix is hard to get... you basically have to write a function that uses a switch to test the numbers and add the suffix.

There's no reason for a language to provide this internally, especially when it's locale specific.

You can do a bit better than that link when it comes to the amount of code to write, but you have to code a function for this...

1
  • 2
    Given all the currency localisation strings etc. it seems a little stretch to add ordinal suffix. Sep 16, 2008 at 4:06

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