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I have searched on this site the topics about malloc on structs. However, I have a slightly problem. Is that malloc on the element of a struct different from malloc on the whole struct, especially when that struct is quite simple, that is, only a member that is exactly what we all want to allocate? To be clear, see the code corresponding to student and student2 structs below.

struct student {
    int* majorScore;
};

struct student2 {
    int majorScore[3];
};


int main()
{
    struct student john;
    john.majorScore = (int*) malloc(sizeof(int) * 3);
    john.majorScore[0] = 50;
    john.majorScore[1] = 27;
    john.majorScore[2] = 56;
 
    struct student2* amy= (struct student2*)malloc(sizeof(struct student2));
    amy->majorScore[0] = 50;
    amy->majorScore[1] = 27;
    amy->majorScore[2] = 56;


    return 0;
}

Are they different in memory level? If yes, what is the difference? If no, which is perhaps better in terms of a good programming style?

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  • 1
    malloc on a stuct will only allocate the size of the struct itself, not the size of dynamic data pointed to by pointers within the struct.
    – h0r53
    Sep 23, 2021 at 15:52
  • 1
    You are not comparing like with like. For john you allocate the array within a local struct. For amy you allocate one struct on the heap with a fixed array. Which is better? If you don't know how many scores there are at compile time, they can't have a fixed array. Sep 23, 2021 at 15:53
  • Are they different in memory level? Well you have provided two different struct definitions, so in that regard they are different. They are the same in that the dynamically allocated data will live somewhere in the .heap section of memory. Which is better in terms of good programming style? Debatable and dependent on your use cases. I would argue a majorScore array of size 3 isn't realistic for real-world scenarios, but if it suites your needs then it's fine to use this method.
    – h0r53
    Sep 23, 2021 at 15:55
  • student2 contains a 3-elements array of int. student contains an int pointer. Those are two very different things. Sep 23, 2021 at 15:55
  • 1
    don't cast malloc() !
    – tstanisl
    Sep 23, 2021 at 19:01

2 Answers 2

2

First, you dynamically allocate one struct, but not the other. So you're comparing apples to oranges.


Statically-allocated structs:

struct student john;
john.majorScore = malloc(sizeof(int) * 3);
john.majorScore[0] = 50;
john.majorScore[1] = 27;
john.majorScore[2] = 56;

struct student2 amy;
amy.majorScore[0] = 50;
amy.majorScore[1] = 27;
amy.majorScore[2] = 56;
struct student john
+------------+----------+      +----------+
| majorScore |         ------->|       50 |
+------------+----------+      +----------+
| [padding]  |          |      |       27 |
+------------+----------+      +----------+
                               |       56 |
                               +----------+

struct student2 amy
+------------+----------+
| majorScore |       50 |
|            +----------+
|            |       27 |
|            +----------+
|            |       56 |
+------------+----------+
| [padding]  |          |
+------------+----------+

struct student uses more memory because it has an extra value (the pointer), and it has the overhead of two memory blocks instead of one.

struct student2 always has memory for exactly three scores, even if you need fewer. And it can't possibly accommodate more than 3.


Dynamically-allocated structs:

struct student *john = malloc(sizeof(struct student));
john->majorScore = malloc(sizeof(int) * 3);
john->majorScore[0] = 50;
john->majorScore[1] = 27;
john->majorScore[2] = 56;

struct student2 *amy = malloc(sizeof(struct student2));
amy->majorScore[0] = 50;
amy->majorScore[1] = 27;
amy->majorScore[2] = 56;
struct student *john
+----------+      +------------+----------+      +----------+
|         ------->| majorScore |         ------->|       50 |
+----------+      +------------+----------+      +----------+
                  | [padding]  |          |      |       27 |
                  +------------+----------+      +----------+
                                                 |       56 |
                                                 +----------+

struct student2 *amy
+----------+      +------------+----------+
|         ------->| majorScore |       50 |
+----------+      |            +----------+
                  |            |       27 |
                  |            +----------+
                  |            |       56 |
                  +------------+----------+
                  | [padding]  |          |
                  +------------+----------+

Same analysis as above.

3
  • Wonderful diagrams for illustrating the data storage
    – h0r53
    Sep 23, 2021 at 16:19
  • don't forget that implementations of malloc() add non-trivial amount of data before the returned pointer. Moreover, usually the minimal allocated block is 32 bytes.
    – tstanisl
    Sep 23, 2021 at 18:59
  • Thank you all very much. It is hard to select a best accepted answer, yours and h0r53's are very helpful.
    – Eric
    Sep 25, 2021 at 4:07
1

Is malloc on a struct simple? Sure, it certainly is. Although you don't need malloc whatsoever for your struct student2 definition, and I'd argue that just using the struct directly and avoiding malloc is MUCH simpler. It's important to note that malloc on a struct will only allocate the size of the struct itself, not the size of dynamic data pointed to by pointers within the struct. What you are comparing is two different structs with very different implementations, so it isn't really fair to say "which one is better" because it largely depends on your actual use cases.

For clarity, let's say you did struct student* john = malloc(sizeof(struct student)). If you allocate storage for a struct like this, you still need to allocate memory for majorScore since it the initial malloc only allocates room for the int * and nothing past that. As you can see, that complicates things even more.

So the conclusion is, in general you only want to use malloc for dynamic memory allocation in circumstances where you may not know the size of data at compile time. There is no reason to introduce complexity (and likely bugs/leaks) through malloc in the examples you have provided. The utility of using malloc in your example for struct student is that majorScore can be an array of any size, not just 3 as in the struct student2 definition.

1
  • I see! Thank you very much!
    – Eric
    Sep 25, 2021 at 4:07

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