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Is the Aspnet boilerplate documentation misleading regarding the use of Background workers and their lifetime?

Looking at the documentation - https://aspnetboilerplate.com/Pages/Documents/Background-Jobs-And-Workers#background-worker-lifestyles

It suggests to use the background worker as Singleton. Whilst its perfectly fine to use the the background worker as a singleton, if you inject in any dependencies through the constructor, they will also all be singletons regardless of what you register the dependencies.

The way I understand it is that, this then means if you are access the database, the unit of work concept is not really applicable as the same DBContext instance is going to be used throughout the time your worker is running. Unless the worker stops and you launch a new worker, you will not end up getting yourself a new DBContext.

here is some sample code

 public class MyWorker : AsyncPeriodicBackgroundWorkerBase, ISingletonDependency
{
    public MyWorker (AbpAsyncTimer timer, IMyTransientService myTransientService) : base(timer)
    {
        _myTransientService= myTransientService;
        Timer.Period = 1000;
    }

    protected override async Task DoWorkAsync() 
    {
       _myTransientService.DoSomething()
    }

When you run something like that, you will know the constructor of MyTransientService is only ever hit once and hence you never get yourself a new instance.

What I did to overcome this is how you would typically resolve the dependencies through the IoC Container. So in my code I have changed it to the following

public class MyWorker : AsyncPeriodicBackgroundWorkerBase, ISingletonDependency
{
    public MyWorker (AbpAsyncTimer timer, IIocResolver iocResolver) : base(timer)
    {
        _iocResolver = iocResolver;
        Timer.Period = 1000;
    }

    protected override async Task DoWorkAsync() 
    {
       using var svc= _iocResolver.ResolveAsDisposable<IMyTransientService>();
       await svc.Object.DoSomething();
    }

This ensures we get a new instance of the implementation of IMyTransientService on each run. If we inject in IRepository into the IMyTransientServiceImplementation, we can be sure to get new instance of DBContext as well.

Is my thinking correct or have I missed something or done something incorrect in my code? I feel like the documentation is forcing to use of Singleton but does not really explain the implications.

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    This is not misleading, its just the way DI works. You can either inject the container/resolver (meh...), create a factory, or use the Orms factory if it has one.
    – TheGeneral
    Sep 24 at 9:01
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In short, I don't think it is misleading.

In any scenario, if you have a singleton resolved from a container, then any of its dependencies will only be resolved once for their use in that singleton instance.

That's just how DI works.

Any other parts of your application may resolve fresh instances of those same dependencies when they are resolved from the container, quite possibly with different scopes.

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