25

Given a string S of length N, return a string that is the result of replacing each '?' in the string S with an 'a' or a 'b' character and does not contain three identical consecutive letters (in other words, neither 'aaa' not 'bbb' may occur in the processed string).

Examples:

Given S="a?bb", output= "aabb"

Given S="??abb", output= "ababb" or "bbabb" or "baabb"

Given S="a?b?aa", output= "aabbaa"

1<=n<= 500000

I solved the problem using backtracking, but my solution is slow and won't work for greater N values, is there a better approach?

1
  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat.
    – Samuel Liew
    Sep 26 at 9:31
14

first of all x??y with more than 1? would always pass

  • a??b => abab (produce no increase of length on both side, *no impact* at following)
  • a??a => abba (no impact)
  • a???????????????????b => ab?????????????????ab

so you only need to consider the case with single ?

  • aa? => aab (no other possibility)
  • a?a => aba (no impact)

so the only problem comes to a?b

  • aa?b => aabb (as describe in aa?)
  • ba?b => baab (no impact)
  • ^a?b => ^aab (only for start, no impact)

You did at most 2 look-back and 2 look-ahead so this is a O(n) solution,

If it can contain invalid input, simply run another O(n) check

I added a possible implementation in my another answer)

1
  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat.
    – Samuel Liew
    Sep 26 at 9:31
9

(Please also see my greedy O(n) time, O(1) space solution that includes random tests, comparing with MTO's code.)

The O(n) dynamic program has four states: a character is either a_first, a_second, b_first or b_second. Let dp[i] represent the possibility of creating a valid string up to index i. Then:

dp[i][a_first] = True
dp[i][a_second] = True
dp[i][b_first] = True
dp[i][b_second] = True
  where i < 0

if s[i] == '?':
  dp[i][a_first] = dp[i-1][b_first] or dp[i-1][b_second]
  dp[i][a_second] = dp[i-1][a_first]
  dp[i][b_first] = dp[i-1][a_first] or dp[i-1][a_second]
  dp[i][b_second] = dp[i-1][b_first]
  
else if s[i] == 'a':
  dp[i][a_first] = dp[i-1][b_first] or dp[i-1][b_second]
  dp[i][a_second] = dp[i-1][a_first]
  dp[i][b_first] = False
  dp[i][b_second] = False
  
else:
  dp[i][a_first] = False
  dp[i][a_second] = False
  dp[i][b_first] = dp[i-1][a_first] or dp[i-1][a_second]
  dp[i][b_second] = dp[i-1][b_first]

where i ≥ 0

To get the strings, we can follow the paths backwards that maintain True throughout and keep the consecutive character constraint.

Python code:

def f(s):
  dp = [[None] * 4 for _ in range(len(s))]

  def get_dp(i, j):
    return True if i < 0 else dp[i][j]

  for i in range(len(s)):
    if s[i] == '?':
      dp[i][0] = get_dp(i-1, 2) or get_dp(i-1, 3)
      dp[i][1] = get_dp(i-1, 0) 
      dp[i][2] = get_dp(i-1, 0) or get_dp(i-1, 1)
      dp[i][3] = get_dp(i-1, 2)
  
    elif s[i] == 'a':
      dp[i][0] = get_dp(i-1, 2) or get_dp(i-1, 3)
      dp[i][1] = get_dp(i-1, 0)
      dp[i][2] = False
      dp[i][3] = False
  
    else:
      dp[i][0] = False
      dp[i][1] = False
      dp[i][2] = get_dp(i-1, 0) or get_dp(i-1, 1)
      dp[i][3] = get_dp(i-1, 2)

  # Build the output
  result = []

  i = len(s) - 1
  need = None

  while i >= 0:
    if dp[i][0] and need != 'b':
      result.append('a')
      need = None if (len(result) == 1 or result[-2] == 'b') else 'b'
      i-= 1
    elif dp[i][1] and need != 'b':
      result.extend(['a', 'a'])
      need = 'b'
      i -= 2
    elif dp[i][2] and need != 'a':
      result.append('b')
      need = None if (len(result) == 1 or result[-2] == 'a') else 'a'
      i -= 1
    elif dp[i][3] and need != 'a':
      result.extend(['b', 'b'])
      need = 'a'
      i -= 2
    else:
      return ""

  return "".join(reversed(result))

Output:

strs = [
  "a?bb", # "aabb"
  "??abb", # "ababb" or "bbabb" or "baabb"
  "a?b?aa", # "aabbaa"
  "?bb?",
  "aa?bb", # NO SOLUTION
  "aa??aa", # "aabbaa"
  "ab???bb?",
  "????",
  "??",
  "?????",
  "??????"
]

for s in strs:
  print("%s\n%s\n" % (s, f(s)))

"""
a?bb
aabb

??abb
baabb

a?b?aa
aabbaa

?bb?
abba

aa?bb


aa??aa
aabbaa

ab???bb?
abbaabba

????
abaa

??
aa

?????
aabaa

??????
baabaa
"""
4
  • I am not very comfortable with dynamic programming. I'm still trying to learn it. But you code seems to work. Does your code work for if all the characters are '?' Sep 24 at 18:06
  • @infernus-85 yup. Just added four examples. Sep 24 at 18:07
  • What do the four dp states dp[i][0], dp[i][1], dp[i][2], dp[i][3] represent? Sep 25 at 4:35
  • @infernus-85 the four dp states dp[i][0], dp[i][1], dp[i][2], dp[i][3] represent whether or not the character at index i of the result can be a "first a," a "second a," a "first b," or a "second b" in that order. For example, a character can only be a "second a" if the previous character can be a "first a" -- try to follow similar common-sense logic to understand the conditions for the other states. Sep 25 at 8:55
3

An iterative backtracking solution.

  • isValid only checks whether inserting a char c at position pos would create an issue, without iterating over the whole string;

  • maintain a variable int dir = +-1 to know whether we're moving forward or backwards in the string (this is only important so that we know in which direction to move when skipping over a non-? character in the original string);

  • forest of if/else if/else to decide where we're at (non-? to skip, or fresh ? going forward, or already tried a, or already tried both a and b);

  • solve has a boolean return value which is true if a solution was found (pos == s.length()), or false if no solution was found (pos == (unsigned int) -1).

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

bool isValid(char c, std::string const &s, unsigned int pos)
{
    return ((pos < 2 || s[pos - 2] != c || s[pos - 1] != c)
         && (pos < 1 || pos + 1 >= s.length() || s[pos - 1] != c || s[pos + 1] != c)
         && (pos + 2 >= s.length() || s[pos + 1] != c || s[pos + 2] != c));
}
bool solve(std::string const &in, std::string &out)
{
    unsigned int pos = 0;
    int dir = 1;
    out = in;
    while (pos < in.size())
    {
        if (in[pos] != '?')  // nothing to do: keep moving (forward or backward)
        {
            pos += dir;
        }
        else if (out[pos] == '?')  // going forward, will try 'a' then 'b'
        {
            dir = 1;
            if (isValid('a', out, pos))
            {
                out[pos] = 'a';
                pos += dir;
            }
            else if (isValid('b', out, pos))
            {
                out[pos] = 'b';
                pos += dir;
            }
            else
            {
                dir = -1;
                pos += dir;
            }
        }
        else if (out[pos] == 'a' && isValid('b', out, pos)) // going backward, already tried 'a'
        {
            out[pos] = 'b';
            dir = 1;
            pos += dir;
        }
        else // already tried everything: backtrack
        {
            dir = -1;
            out[pos] = '?';
            pos += dir;
        }
    }
    return (pos == in.size());
}

int main(void)
{
  std::vector<std::string> ins  = {"a?bb", "??abb", "a?b?aa", "aa?bb"};
  std::vector<std::string> outs = {"", "", "", "", ""};
  for (unsigned int i = 0; i < ins.size(); ++i)
  {
      if (solve(ins[i], outs[i]))
          std::cout << ins[i] << "  -->  " << outs[i] << std::endl;
      else
          std::cout << ins[i] << "  -->  NO SOLUTION" << std::endl;
  }
  return 0;
}

Output:

a?bb  -->  aabb
??abb  -->  ababb
a?b?aa  -->  aabbaa
aa?bb  -->  NO SOLUTION
1
  • 1
    Thanks. This is the optimized version of the backtracking solution. I learned a lot from this. Sep 24 at 17:51
1

The greedy version below seems to work. This way, we could have constant space aside from one output string. Can someone help find a counter example? I wrote this idea before implementing the straightforward dynamic program (see this revision). Try to maintain sequences of two of the same character as much as possible.

The last section of the code below includes random testing with this and MTO's code.

Python code:

def is_valid(s):
  if not s:
    return True
  char = "x"
  count = 0
  for c in s:
    if c != char:
      char, count = c, 1
    else:
      count += 1
      if count == 3:
        return False
  return True


# My greedy solution
def f(s):
  if len(s) == 2:
    return s.replace('?', 'a')
    
  aa = ['a', 'a']
  bb = ['b', 'b']

  out = []
  i = 0
  a, b = 0, 0

  while i < len(s):
    if s[i] == 'a' or (s[i] == '?' and b == 2):
      if s[i] == 'a' and a == 2:
        if s[i-3:i-1] == "??":
          out[i-3], out[i-2] = out[i-2], out[i-3]
          a -= 1
        else:
          return ""
      out.append('a')
      a, b = a + 1, 0
      i += 1
    elif s[i] == 'b' or (s[i] == '?' and a == 2):
      if s[i] == 'b' and b == 2:
        if s[i-3:i-1] == "??":
          out[i-3], out[i-2] = out[i-2], out[i-3]
          b -= 1
        else:
          return ""
      out.append('b')
      a, b = 0, b + 1
      i += 1
    elif i == len(s) - 1:
      out.append('a' if b else 'b')
      i += 1
    elif i == len(s) - 2:
      if s[i+1] == '?':
        out.extend(aa if b else bb)
      else:
        out.append('a' if b else 'b')
        out.append(s[i+1])
      i += 2
    elif s[i+1] == '?':
      if a:
        out.append('a')
        a, b = a + 1, 0
      else:
        out.append('b')
        a, b = 0, b + 1
      i += 1
    elif s[i+1] == 'a':
      if a or b < 2:
        out.append('b')
        a, b = 0, b + 1
      else:
        out.append('a')
        a, b = a + 1, 0
      i += 1
    elif s[i+1] == 'b':
      if b or a < 2:
        out.append('a')
        a, b = a + 1, 0
      else:
        out.append('b')
        a, b = 0, b + 1
      i += 1

  return ''.join(out)


# https://stackoverflow.com/a/69322213/2034787
# Code by MTO
def solve(_str):
  opposite = {"a": "b", "b": "a"}
  curr_idx = 0
  output = []
  
  lookahead  = lambda x: None if ((curr_idx + x < 0) or (curr_idx + x >= len(_str))) else _str[curr_idx + x]
  lookbehind = lambda x: None if curr_idx-x< 0 else output[curr_idx - x]
  matches = lambda x, y: x == y or x == None or y == None
  is_replacement = lambda x: x == '?'
  
  while curr_idx < len(_str):
    curr = lookbehind(1) or 'b'
    i = 0
    next = lookahead(i)
    while is_replacement(next):
      i += 1
      next = lookahead(i)
    
    if next == None:
      # Found the end of the string.
      # Append characters opposite to the previous for each ?
      for _ in range(i, 0, -1):
        curr = opposite[curr]
        output.append( curr )
      break

    if (i > 1):
      # Found multiple successive ?s
      # Handle the first half of the ?s by
      # Append alternating characters from the previous character.
      j = 0
      while j < i / 2:
        curr = opposite[curr]
        output.append( curr )
        j += 1
      # Then handle the second half of the ?s
      # append alternating characters to the next character after the ?s.
      while j < i:
        output.append( next if (j%2) == (i%2) else opposite[next] )
        j += 1
  
    elif i == 1:
      # Found a single ?
      prev = lookbehind(2)
      if curr == prev and curr == opposite[next] and next == lookahead(2):
        # No solution.
        return None

      if curr == prev or matches(curr, next):
        output.append( opposite[curr] )
      else:
        output.append( curr )

    if next != None:
      # Output the next non-? character.
      output.append( next )

    curr_idx += i + 1
  
  return ''.join(output)


strs = [
  "a?bb", # "aabb"
  "??abb", # "ababb" or "bbabb" or "baabb"
  "a?b?aa", # "aabbaa"
  "?bb?",
  "aa?bb", # NO SOLUTION
  "aa??aa", # "aabbaa"
  "ab???bb?",
  "????",
  "??",
  "?????",
  "??????",
  "?",
  "a?",
  "a??",
  "a???",
  "b?",
  "b??",
  "b???",
  "a?a",
  "a?b",
  "b?a",
  "b?b",
  "a??a",
  "a??b",
  "b??a",
  "b??b",
  "aa?",
  "ba?",
  "a?bb",
  "?bb?",
  "??abb",
  "a?b?aa",
  "ab???bb?",
  "aa?bb"
]


for s in strs:
  _solve = solve(s)
  _f = f(s)
  print("%s\n%s, %s, %s, %s\n" % (s, is_valid(_f), is_valid(_solve), _solve, _f))


import random

def get_random(n):
  char = 'x'
  count = 0
  out = []
  not_c = lambda c: 'a' if c == 'b' else 'b'

  for _ in range(n):
    c = ['a', 'b'][int(random.random() * 2)]
    if c != char:
      out.append(c)
      char, count = c, 1
    elif count == 2:
      out.append(not_c(c))
      char, count = not_c(c), 1
    else:
      out.append(c)
      count += 1

  for i in range(n):
     if int(random.random() * 2):
      out[i] = '?'

  return ''.join(out)

num_tests = 1000
n = 20

print("Starting random tests...")

for _ in range(num_tests):
  s = get_random(n)
  _solve = solve(s)
  _f = f(s)
  valid_solve = is_valid(_solve)
  valid_f = is_valid(_f)
  if not valid_f or not valid_solve:
    print(s, valid_f, valid_solve, _f, _solve)
    break

print("Done testing")
1

Implementing @appleapple's O(N) solution in JavaScript (but should be relatively simple to port to C++):

let solve = (str) => {
  let opposite = {"a":"b","b":"a"};
  let curr_idx = 0;
  let output = [];
  
  let lookahead  = (x) => ((curr_idx+x<0)||(curr_idx+x>=str.length)?null:str[curr_idx + x]);
  let lookbehind = (x) => (curr_idx-x<0?null:output[curr_idx - x])
  let matches    = (x,y) => (x == y || x == null || y == null);
  let is_replacement = (x) => (x == '?');
  
  while ( curr_idx < str.length )
  {
    let curr = lookbehind(1) || 'b';
    let i = 0;
    let next = lookahead(i);
    while (is_replacement(next))
    {
      ++i;
      next = lookahead(i);
    }
    
    if (next == null)
    {
      // Found the end of the string.
      // Append characters opposite to the previous for each ?
      for (; i > 0; --i)
      {
        curr = opposite[curr];
        output.push( curr );
      }
      break;
    }

    if (i > 1)
    {
      // Found multiple successive ?s
      // Handle the first half of the ?s by
      // Append alternating characters from the previous character.
      let j = 0;
      for (; j < i/ 2; ++j)
      {
        curr = opposite[curr];
        output.push( curr );
      }
      // Then handle the second half of the ?s
      // append alternating characters to the next character after the ?s.
      for (; j < i; ++j)
      {
        output.push( (j%2) == (i%2) ? next : opposite[next] );
      }
    }
    else if (i == 1)
    {
      // Found a single ?
      let prev = lookbehind(2);
      if (curr == prev && curr == opposite[next] && next == lookahead(2))
      {
        // No solution.
        return null;
      }
      if (curr == prev || matches(curr, next))
      {
        output.push( opposite[curr] );
      }
      else
      {
        output.push( curr );
      }
    }

    if ( next != null )
    {
      // Output the next non-? character.
      output.push( next );
    }
    curr_idx += i + 1;
  }
  
  return output.join("");
};

let tests = [
  "?",
  "a?",
  "a??",
  "a???",
  "b?",
  "b??",
  "b???",
  "a?a",
  "a?b",
  "b?a",
  "b?b",
  "a??a",
  "a??b",
  "b??a",
  "b??b",
  "aa?",
  "ba?",
  "a?bb",
  "?bb?",
  "??abb",
  "a?b?aa",
  "ab???bb?",
  "aa?bb",
];

for ( let test of tests )
{
  console.log( `${test} -> ${solve(test)}` );
}


Update - All possible solutions

It is possible to reduce the problem to 10 rules operating from left-to-right on the string looking at a maximum window of 6 characters (2 look-behind and 4 look-ahead) such that the rules can generate all possible solutions for the string:

Rules:
0: ss?dd_ -> No solution
1: __??ss -> __?dss
2: _s?s__ -> _sds__
3: ss?___ -> ssd___
4: __?ss_ -> __dss_
5: DS?DS_ -> DSsDS_ | DSdDS_
6: DS??sD -> DSsdsD | DSddsD | DSdssD
7: Ds??dS -> DsdsdS | DssddS
8:  ^??X_ ->  ^s?X_ |  ^d?X_
9: Ds??X_ -> DssdX_ | Dsd?X_

Notations:
 s: Same character.
 d: The opposite of the same character.
 S: Either the same character or the end-of-the-string.
 D: Either the opposite of the same character or the start- or end-of-the-string.
 _: Any character or the start- or end-of-the-string.
 ?: A character to replace.
 X: Either a character to replace or the end-of-the-string.
 ^: The start-of-the-string.

(Note: Rule 1 is essentially the same as rule 4 but handles the later replacement character first.)

This leads to the JavaScript code:

function* solve(
  str,
  i = 0,
  depth = 0
)
{
  let data        = Array.from(str);
  let chr         = (n) => (n < 0 || n > data.length ? null : data[n]);

  let lookbehind2 = chr(i - 2);
  let lookbehind1 = chr(i - 1);
  let current     = chr(i);
  let lookahead1  = chr(i + 1);
  let lookahead2  = chr(i + 2);
  let lookahead3  = chr(i + 3);

  const DEBUG     = (rule) => {
    if (false)
    {
      console.log(`${"".padStart(depth)}Rule ${rule}@${i}: ${str} -> ${data.join("")}`)
    }
  };

  let stepForward = (steps) => {
    for (let n = 0; n < steps; ++n)
    {
      ++i;
      lookbehind2 = lookbehind1;
      lookbehind1 = current;
      current     = lookahead1;
      lookahead1  = lookahead2;
      lookahead2  = lookahead3;
      lookahead3  = chr(i + 3);
    }
  }

  let isSolved = (ch) => (ch == 'a' || ch == 'b');
  let isSame = (ch1, ch2) => (isSolved(ch1) && ch1 == ch2);
  let opposite = (ch) => ({"a":"b","b":"a"}[ch]);
  let isOpposite = (ch1, ch2) => (isSolved(ch1) && ch1 == opposite(ch2));
  let isEndOfString = (ch) => (ch == null);
  let isStartOfString = (ch) => (ch == null);

  while( !isEndOfString(current) )
  {
    if (current != '?')
    {
      stepForward(1);
      continue;
    }
    
    // Rules:
    //  0: ss?dd_ -> No solution
    //  1: __??ss -> __?dss
    //  2: _s?s__ -> _sds__
    //  3: ss?___ -> ssd___
    //  4: __?ss_ -> __dss_
    //  5: DS?DS_ -> DSsDS_ | DSdDS_
    //  6: DS??sD -> DSsdsD | DSddsD | DSdssD
    //  7: Ds??dS -> DsdsdS | DssddS
    //  8:  $??X_ ->  $s?X_ |  $d?X_
    //  9: Ds??X_ -> DssdX_ | Dsd?X_
    //
    // Notations:
    //   s: Same character.
    //   d: The opposite of the same character.
    //   S: Either the same character or the end-of-the-string.
    //   D: Either the opposite of the same character or the start- or end-of-the-string.
    //   _: Any character or the start- or end-of-the-string.
    //   ?: A character to replace.
    //   X: Either a character to replace or the end-of-the-string.
    //   $: The end-of-the-string.
    // -----------------------------------------------------------
    
    // Rule 0: ss?dd_ -> No solution
    if (
      isSame(lookbehind2, lookbehind1)
      && isSame(lookahead1, lookahead2)
      && lookbehind1 != lookahead1
    )
    {
      DEBUG(0);
      return;
    }

    // Rule 1: __??ss -> __?dss
    if (lookahead1 == '?' && isSame(lookahead2, lookahead3))
    {
      data[i + 1] = lookahead1 = opposite(lookahead2);
      DEBUG(1);
    }
      
    // Rule 2: _s?s__ -> _sds__
    if (isSame(lookbehind1, lookahead1))
    {
      data[i] = current = opposite(lookahead1);
      DEBUG(2);
      stepForward(2);
      continue;
    }

    // Rule 3: ss?___ -> ssd___
    if (isSame(lookbehind2, lookbehind1))
    {
      data[i] = current = opposite(lookbehind1);
      DEBUG(3);
      stepForward(1);
      continue;
    }

    // Rule 4: __?ss_ -> __dss_
    if (isSame(lookahead1, lookahead2))
    {
      data[i] = current = opposite(lookahead1);
      DEBUG(4);
      stepForward(3);
      continue;
    }

    // Rule 5: DS?DS_ -> DSsDS_ | DSdDS_
    if (lookahead1 != '?')
    {
      data[i] = current = "a";
      DEBUG(5);
      for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 2, depth + 1))
      {
        yield solution;
      }
      data[i] = current = "b";
      DEBUG(5);
      for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 2, depth + 1))
      {
        yield solution;
      }
      return;
    }

    // Rule 6: DS??sD -> DSsdsD | DSddsD | DSdssD
    if (
      isSame(lookbehind1, lookahead2)
      || (isStartOfString(lookbehind1) && isSolved(lookahead2))
    )
    {
      data[i]   = current    = lookahead2;
      data[i+1] = lookahead1 = opposite(lookahead2);
      DEBUG(6);
      for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 3, depth + 1))
      {
        yield solution;
      }
      data[i]   = current    = opposite(lookahead2);
      data[i+1] = lookahead1 = opposite(lookahead2);
      DEBUG(6);
      for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 3, depth + 1))
      {
        yield solution;
      }
      data[i]   = current    = opposite(lookahead2);
      data[i+1] = lookahead1 = lookahead2;
      DEBUG(6);
      for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 3, depth + 1))
      {
        yield solution;
      }
      return;      
    }
    
    
    // Rule 7: Ds??dS -> DsdsdS | DssddS
    if (isOpposite(lookahead2, lookbehind1))
    {
      data[i]   = current    = lookahead2;
      data[i+1] = lookahead1 = opposite(lookahead2);
      DEBUG(7);
      for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 3, depth + 1))
      {
        yield solution;
      }
      data[i]   = current    = opposite(lookahead2);
      data[i+1] = lookahead1 = lookahead2;
      DEBUG(7);
      for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 3, depth + 1))
      {
        yield solution;
      }
      return;      
    }

    // Rule 8:  $??X_ ->  $s?X_ |  $d?X_
    // Rule 9: Ds??X_ -> DssdX_ | Dsd?X_
    if (lookahead2 == "?" || isEndOfString(lookahead2))
    {
      if (isStartOfString(lookbehind1))
      {
        data[i] = current = "a";
        DEBUG(8);
        for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 1, depth + 1))
        {
          yield solution;
        }
        data[i] = current = "b";
        DEBUG(8);
        for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 1, depth + 1))
        {
          yield solution;
        }
      }
      else
      {
        data[i] = current = opposite(lookbehind1);
        DEBUG(9);
        for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 1, depth + 1))
        {
          yield solution;
        }
        data[i]   = current    = lookbehind1;
        data[i+1] = lookahead1 = opposite(lookbehind1);
        DEBUG(9);
        for (solution of solve(data.join(""), i + 2, depth + 1))
        {
          yield solution;
        }
      }
      return;
    }
    
    throw `Invalid state ${data.join("")}`;
  }
  
  yield data.join("");       
}        

let tests = [
  "?",
  "??",
  "???",
  "a?",
  "a??",
  "a???",
  "b?",
  "b??",
  "b???",
  "a?a",
  "a?b",
  "b?a",
  "b?b",
  "a??a",
  "a??b",
  "b??a",
  "b??b",
  "aa?",
  "ba?",
  "a?bb",
  "?bb?",
  "?a",
  "?aa",
  "??aa",
  "???aa",
  "????aa",
  "?ab",
  "??ab",
  "???ab",
  "????ab",
  "a?b?aa",
  "ab???bb?",
  "aa?bb",
  "a?b?a?bb",
  "?a?b?aa",
];

for ( let test of tests )
{
  console.log( `${test} -> ${[...solve(test)]}` );
}

If you want a single solution then you should be able to take only the first match for each rule and implement that in a O(N) time and O(1) memory solver.


Update 2: C++ solution

Same algorithm as the JavaScript solution but uses a stack of partial solutions (rather than the JavaScript solution of recursively calling generator functions).

#include <iostream>
#include <list>

class PartialSolution
{
  public:
    const std::string partial_solution;
    const int position;

    PartialSolution(
      std::string const &solution,
      const int pos
    ):
      partial_solution(solution),
      position(pos)
    {}
};

class Solver
{
    const bool DEBUGGING = false;
    std::string str;
    int position;
    
    char lookbehind2;
    char lookbehind1;
    char current;
    char lookahead1;
    char lookahead2;
    char lookahead3;
    
    char get_character(int pos) const
    {
      if ( pos < 0 || pos >= str.length() )
      {
        return '\0';
      }
      return str[pos];
    }
    
    void load_partial_solution(PartialSolution const &ps)
    {
      str = ps.partial_solution;
      position = ps.position;
      
      lookbehind2 = get_character(position - 2);
      lookbehind1 = get_character(position - 1);
      current     = get_character(position + 0);
      lookahead1  = get_character(position + 1);
      lookahead2  = get_character(position + 2);
      lookahead3  = get_character(position + 3);

      if (DEBUGGING)
      {
        std::cout << "Load @" << position << ": " << str << "\n";
      }
    }

    void step_forward(int n)
    {
      for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
      {
        ++position;
        lookbehind2 = lookbehind1;
        lookbehind1 = current;
        current     = lookahead1;
        lookahead1  = lookahead2;
        lookahead2  = lookahead3;
        lookahead3  = get_character(position + 3);
      }
    }
    
    bool is_solved(char ch) const
    {
      return ch == 'a' || ch == 'b';
    }

    bool is_same(char ch1, char ch2) const
    {
      return is_solved(ch1) && ch1 == ch2;
    }

    char opposite(char ch) const
    {
      switch(ch)
      {
        case 'a': return 'b';
        case 'b': return 'a';
        default:
             return '\0';
      }
    }
    
    bool is_opposite(char ch1, char ch2) const
    {
      return is_solved(ch1) && ch1 == opposite(ch2);
    }

    bool is_end_of_string(char ch) const
    {
      return ch == '\0';
    }

    bool is_start_of_string(char ch) const
    {
      return ch == '\0';
    }
    
    void DEBUG(int rule, bool pushback = false) const
    {
      if (DEBUGGING)
      {
        std::cout << (pushback?"Save: ":"") << "Rule " << rule << "@" << position << ": " << str << "\n";
      }
    }
  public:
    std::list<std::string> solve(std::string const&);
};


std::list<std::string> Solver::solve(std::string const& data)
{
  std::list<PartialSolution> partial_solutions = { PartialSolution(data, 0) };
  std::list<std::string> solutions = {};
  
  while( !partial_solutions.empty() )
  {
    load_partial_solution( partial_solutions.back() );
    partial_solutions.pop_back();
    
    while( !is_end_of_string(current) )
    {
      if (current != '?')
      {
        step_forward(1);
        continue;
      }

      // Rules:
      //  0: ss?dd_ -> No solution
      //  1: __??ss -> __?dss
      //  2: _s?s__ -> _sds__
      //  3: ss?___ -> ssd___
      //  4: __?ss_ -> __dss_
      //  5: DS?DS_ -> DSsDS_ | DSdDS_
      //  6: DS??sD -> DSsdsD | DSddsD | DSdssD
      //  7: Ds??dS -> DsdsdS | DssddS
      //  8:  $??X_ ->  $s?X_ |  $d?X_
      //  9: Ds??X_ -> DssdX_ | Dsd?X_
      //
      // Notations:
      //   s: Same character.
      //   d: The opposite of the same character.
      //   S: Either the same character or the end-of-the-string.
      //   D: Either the opposite of the same character or the start- or end-of-the-string.
      //   _: Any character or the start- or end-of-the-string.
      //   ?: A character to replace.
      //   X: Either a character to replace or the end-of-the-string.
      //   $: The end-of-the-string.
      // -----------------------------------------------------------

      // Rule 0: ss?dd_ -> No solution
      if (
        is_same(lookbehind2, lookbehind1)
        && is_same(lookahead1, lookahead2)
        && lookbehind1 != lookahead1
      )
      {
        DEBUG(0);
        goto no_solution;
      }

      // Rule 1: __??ss -> __?dss
      if (lookahead1 == '?' && is_same(lookahead2, lookahead3))
      {
        lookahead1 = opposite(lookahead2);
        str[position+1] = lookahead1;
        DEBUG(1);
      }
      
      // Rule 2: _s?s__ -> _sds__
      if (is_same(lookbehind1, lookahead1))
      {
        str[position] = current = opposite(lookahead1);
        DEBUG(2);
        step_forward(2);
        continue;
      }

      // Rule 3: ss?___ -> ssd___
      if (is_same(lookbehind2, lookbehind1))
      {
        str[position] = current = opposite(lookbehind1);
        DEBUG(3);
        step_forward(1);
        continue;
      }

      // Rule 4: __?ss_ -> __dss_
      if (is_same(lookahead1, lookahead2))
      {
        str[position] = current = opposite(lookahead1);
        DEBUG(4);
        step_forward(3);
        continue;
      }

      // Rule 5: DS?DS_ -> DSsDS_ | DSdDS_
      if (lookahead1 != '?')
      {
        str[position] = current = 'b';
        DEBUG(5, true);
        partial_solutions.emplace_back(str, position + 2);
        str[position] = current = 'a';
        DEBUG(5);
        step_forward(2);
        continue;
      }

      // Rule 6: DS??sD -> DSsdsD | DSddsD | DSdssD
      if (
        is_same(lookbehind1, lookahead2)
        || (is_start_of_string(lookbehind1) && is_solved(lookahead2))
      )
      {
        str[position]   = current    = opposite(lookahead2);
        str[position+1] = lookahead1 = lookahead2;
        DEBUG(6, true);
        partial_solutions.emplace_back(str, position + 3);
        str[position]   = current    = opposite(lookahead2);
        str[position+1] = lookahead1 = opposite(lookahead2);
        DEBUG(6, true);
        partial_solutions.emplace_back(str, position + 3);
        str[position]   = current    = lookahead2;
        str[position+1] = lookahead1 = opposite(lookahead2);
        DEBUG(6);
        step_forward(3);
        continue;
      }

      // Rule 7: Ds??dS -> DsdsdS | DssddS
      if (is_opposite(lookahead2, lookbehind1))
      {
        str[position]   = current    = opposite(lookahead2);
        str[position+1] = lookahead1 = lookahead2;
        DEBUG(7, true);
        partial_solutions.emplace_back(str, position + 3);
        str[position]   = current    = lookahead2;
        str[position+1] = lookahead1 = opposite(lookahead2);
        DEBUG(7);
        step_forward(3);
        continue;
      }

      // Rule 8:  $??X_ ->  $s?X_ |  $d?X_
      // Rule 9: Ds??X_ -> DssdX_ | Dsd?X_
      if (lookahead2 == '?' || is_end_of_string(lookahead2))
      {
        if (is_start_of_string(lookbehind1))
        {
          str[position] =  current = 'b';
          DEBUG(8, true);
          partial_solutions.emplace_back(str, position + 1);
          str[position] = current = 'a';
          DEBUG(8);
          step_forward(1);
          continue;
        }
        else
        {
          str[position]   = current    = lookbehind1;
          str[position+1] = lookahead1 = opposite(lookbehind1);
          DEBUG(9, true);
          partial_solutions.emplace_back(str, position + 2);
          str[position]   = current    = opposite(lookbehind1);
          str[position+1] = lookahead1 = '?';
          DEBUG(9);
          continue;
        }
      }

      throw std::invalid_argument(str);
    }
    
    solutions.push_back(str);
    
    no_solution:;
  }
  
  return solutions;
}

void run_test(
  Solver &solver,
  std::string const &test
)
{
  std::cout << test << " -> ";
  std::list<std::string> solutions = solver.solve(test);
  int size = solutions.size();
  for (const auto& solution : solutions)
  {
    std::cout << solution;
    if (--size != 0)
    {
      std::cout << ", ";
    }
  }
  std::cout << "\n";
}

int main()
{
  std::list<std::string> tests = {
    "?",
    "??",
    "???",
    "a?",
    "a??",
    "a???",
    "b?",
    "b??",
    "b???",
    "a?a",
    "a?b",
    "b?a",
    "b?b",
    "a??a",
    "a??b",
    "b??a",
    "b??b",
    "aa?",
    "ba?",
    "a?bb",
    "?bb?",
    "?a",
    "?aa",
    "??aa",
    "???aa",
    "????aa",
    "?ab",
    "??ab",
    "???ab",
    "????ab",
    "a?b?aa",
    "ab???bb?",
    "aa?bb",
    "a?b?a?bb",
    "?a?b?aa",
  };
  Solver solver = Solver();
  for (const auto& test : tests)
  {
    run_test(solver, test);
  }
}
12
  • Thanks, now I understand the algorithm a little better. What are the lookahead and lookbehind functions doing? From what I understand, this algorithm is based on the sliding window. The look ahead and look behind are finding two characters that are not wildcards & are in between wildcards. Am I right? Sep 25 at 12:03
  • @infernus-85 and MTO, I believe I fixed a bug in my greedy O(n) time, O(1) space solution. I include code at the end that tests 1000 random (but valid) inputs. Both this and my greedy approach seem to pass. stackoverflow.com/a/69327013/2034787 And here: ideone.com/N9vXFa Sep 25 at 20:50
  • @infernus-85 Look-behind looks at prior characters in the string at a relative offset to the current position being solved. Look-ahead looks at characters in the string at a relative offset to the first non-replacement character after the current position being solved.
    – MT0
    Sep 25 at 23:57
  • @infernus-85 and MT0, apple apple implemented their solution. It's genius -- so short! See here (and here is a python version with random testing as well ideone.com/oGwDef) Sep 26 at 10:51
  • @גלעדברקן I've looked at the c++ code and now I've finally understood the algorithm. The only problem I was having was the start of the string. Once we deal with all the starting permutations, then it's easy from there. Sep 26 at 13:44
1

Possible Implementation for rules in my answer.


This implementation is

  • left-to-right
  • single pass with 2 look-behind and 1 look-ahead (despite initial checking)
  • O(n) time complexity
  • can be O(1) space complexity since the context is at most 4 character
  • does not check for invalid Input

First merge the rules

  • a?? => ab?
    • a??b => abab (a??b => ab?b => abab)
    • a??a => abba
    • a???????????????????b => ab??????????????????b
  • ba?b => baab
  • ^a?b => ^aab
  • a? => ab otherwise (also imply a??)
    • aa? => aab
    • a?a => aba
    • aa?b => aabb

Then setup the boundary conditions.

The rule need the string not start with ?s (not necessary if simply fill them in another pass)

  • ^?? => a? (as if we prepend a b)
  • ^?a => ba

The rule need 2 look back in case of a?b so I simply pre-apply it to prevent the check inside primary loop

  • prefill ^a?b => ^aab

The Code (WandBox link)

char inverse(char c){return c=='a'?'b':'a';}

std::string solve(std::string s){
   
   /// boundary conditions
   
   if(s.size()<3){
      for(auto& c:s) if(c=='?') c='b';
      return s;
   }
   
   if(s.starts_with("??")) s[0]='a'; // ?? => a? // not really necessary if use another pass to fill prefix '?'s
   if(s.starts_with("?a")  || s.starts_with("?b"))  s[0]=inverse(s[1]); // ?a => ba // not really necessary as above
   if(s.starts_with("a??") || s.starts_with("b??")) s[1]=inverse(s[0]); // not really necessary, just to prevent access s[-1]
   if(s.starts_with("a?b") || s.starts_with("b?a")) s[1]=s[0]; // ^a?b => aab
   
   /// primary loop
   
   for(auto curr=s.data(); curr!=s.data()+s.size(); ++curr)
   if(*curr=='?'){
      if(curr[-1]!=curr[1] && curr[-2]==curr[1]) *curr=curr[-1]; // ba?b => baab
      else *curr = inverse(curr[-1]); // a? => b (rule coaslesing)
   }
    
   return s;
}
-1

I quickly tried out the solution I proposed in the comments:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main(void)
{
    std::string s = "?????aaa??bbaa????";
    std::cout << s <<'\n';
    for(char &c:s)
        if(c=='?')
            c='a';
    
    std::cout << s <<'\n';

    for(int i =0; i<s.size()-2; i++)
    {
        if(s[i] == 'a' 
        && s[i+1] == 'a' 
        && s[i+2] == 'a' )
        {
            s[i+1] = 'b';
            i++;
        }
    }
    std::cout << s <<'\n';
    return 0;
}

It seems to be conformant with the given rules. but maybe there's some case to check and fix.

4
  • 1
    Pretty sure that's not conformant - your program risks modifying the non-? characters from the original string. For instance, if the input is "?aa", then the output should be "baa", but your program will output "aba".
    – Stef
    Sep 24 at 13:59
  • I think I idea is to replace all '?' values with 'a' initially and remember the positions of '?' . After that you check only the '?' positions and satisfy the given constraints. Sep 24 at 14:02
  • @Federico I think this is correct (after a bit of optimization) as I cannot disprove it. I will look more into this. Thanks Sep 24 at 14:03
  • I implemented the approach above and it does not work. Consider the S="a?b?aa". You replace all the '?' with a's and remember the indices 0 and 2 (the '?''s). The idea was to replace a with b after finding s[i]==s[i+1] && s[i]==s[i-1]. But, it dosen't work because and last 3 characters become "aaa". Even if you do a second pass with all the characters this time and change the ones that don't follow the constraints, then you could mess up the ones before. Sep 24 at 14:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.