10

I'm new to React and I have this function.

    import Axios from "axios";
    
    const UserService = {
        getUserRole: (access_token: string = "") => {
            return Axios({
                method: "get",
                url: "https://<url>/user/role",
                headers: {
                    "Authorization": `Bearer ${access_token}`
                }
            }).then((response) => {
                return response.data;
            }).catch((error) => {
                console.log(error);
            });
        }
    }

export default UserService

The getUserRole is used constantly by another component, for example

import UserService from "../../../services/authentication/userService";
import { useAuth } from "react-oidc-context";

...

const auth = useAuth();
UserService.getUserRole(auth.user?.access_token);

As you can see, I have to constantly pass the access_token from useAuth. Is there any way I can call useAuth inside my UserService so I don't have to constantly pass the access_token from my component?

3
  • 1
    Not to my knowledge, but you could 1) make it so you only have to pass in the auth object, and your getUserRole function could do a propery access on that for the access_token, or 2) initialize a propery of UserService with the value of auth initially, and then on each subsequent call just use getUserRole. However, there might be a specific function that the library you're using exposes, in which case an answer to this question would only apply to this one library's one funciton Commented Sep 27, 2021 at 3:06
  • 1
    No, you can only call React hooks from React functions and custom hooks. You could create a custom useGetUserRole React hook that does that work for you and returns the getUserRole Promise.
    – Drew Reese
    Commented Sep 27, 2021 at 3:10
  • Hooks are part of React and like other comments say you can't use hooks in your API calls. You are looking for a common ground for your components and your API. You may use Session storage for this purpose. Other options like Local storage or Indexed DB will also work. But I believe you would like to get rid of the token when a session is finished. Commented Sep 27, 2021 at 3:52

1 Answer 1

12

The premise of the question is backward, as we shouldn't try to use hooks outside of React, but instead use outside code inside of React.

Quick solution: Custom hook

If the roles are used all over the place, a quick custom hook will get you started. This is the easiest way to wrap custom logic as hooks are meant to wrap stateful logic for reuse in components.

import ­{ useState, useEffect } from "react";
import { useAuth } from "react-oidc-context";
import UserService from "../../../services/authentication/userService";

/**
 * Custom hooks that fetches the roles for the logged in user.
 */
const useRoles = () => {
  const auth = useAuth();
  const [roles, setRoles] = useState();

  useEffect(() => {
    if (!user) return; // pre-condition
    UserService
      .getUserRole(auth.user.access_token)
      .then(setRoles);
  }, [auth.user]);

  return roles;
}

Then in any component:

import useRoles from "../useRoles";

const MyExampleComponent = () => {
  const roles = useRoles();

  if (!roles) return <span>Please login (or something) to see the roles!</span>

  return <div>{/* use roles here */}</div>
}

Better solution: Service provider

If there's a lot of different methods on the user service that needs to be used all over the app, then wrapping the whole service and providing a ready-to-use version through React's context would be best in my opinion.

But first, let's rework the UserService a little so that it uses a local axios instance instead of the global axios instance.

// I also made it a class, but it would also work with an object.
class UserService {
  constructor(axios) {
    this.axios = axios;
  }

  getUserRole(){
    // use the local axios instance
    return this.axios({
      method: "get",
      // Use the default URL from local axios instance 
      url: "user/role",
    })
      .then(({ data }) => data)
      .catch(console.log),
  }

  getSomethingElse() {
    // ...
  }
}

Then, we can setup the React's context for the user service.

// UserServiceContext.js
import React from 'react';
import { useAuth } from "react-oidc-context";
import UserService from "../../../services/authentication/userService";

// Local axios instance
const axiosInstance = axios.create({
  baseURL: 'https://<url>', // set the base URL once here
});

const userServiceInstance = new UserService(axiosInstance);

const UserServiceContext = React.createContext(userServiceInstance);

// Convenience hook
export const useUserService = () => useContext(UserServiceContext);

export const UserServiceProvider = (props) => {
  const auth = useAuth();

  useEffect(() => {
    // If the user changes, update the token used by our local axios instance.
    axiosInstance.defaults.headers
      .common['Authorization'] = `Bearer ${auth.user?.access_token}`;
  }, [auth.user]);

  return (
    <UserServiceContext.Provider value={userServiceInstance} {...props} />
  );  
}

Then anywhere, but commonly at the App's root:

import { AuthProvider } from "react-oidc-context";
import { UserServiceProvider } from "./UserServiceContext";

const App = () => (
  <AuthProvider>
    <UserServiceProvider>
      <Content />
    </UserServiceProvider>
  </AuthProvider>
);

Now everything is ready to be used in any component!

import { useUserService } from '../UserServiceContext';

const MyExampleComponent = () => {
  const userService = useUserService();
  const [roles, setRoles] = useState();

  // e.g. load roles once on mount.
  useEffect(() => {
    userService // use the service from the context
      .getUserRole() // no auth token needed anymore!
      .then(setRoles);
  }, []);

  if (!roles) return <span>Please login (or something) to see the roles!</span>

  return <div>{/* use roles here */}</div>
}

Note that a custom hook could still be used to wrap the roles fetching logic. Both the context and hooks can be used together to wrap logic to each's own preferences.

// Here's what the hook could look like if it used the new provider above.
const useRoles = () => {
  const userService = useUserService();
  const [roles, setRoles] = useState();

  // e.g. load roles once on mount.
  useEffect(() => {
    userService // use the service from the context
      .getUserRole() // no auth token needed anymore!
      .then(setRoles);
  }, []);

  return roles;
}

I consider the provider solution to be better since it provides more flexibility while keeping control over the exposed API.

In my solution, I suggest using the UserService instance as the provided value, but the provider could be changed to expose only parts of the API, or it could provide the roles and other data automatically. It's up to you!


Disclaimer: I've used minimal code to demonstrate a working solution and my answer may not address all constraints of your situation. For example, the axios instance could be created inside the provider as a lazy initialized useRef, same thing goes for the UserService instance, etc.

5
  • 1
    thank you, I'm very new to react and it feels like I constantly have to fight with the framework rules. But this is a very clear explanation, thanks again.
    – tickwave
    Commented Sep 27, 2021 at 4:27
  • @warheat1990 React comes with its mental model and it's easier to embrace it than to fight it! Commented Sep 27, 2021 at 6:44
  • 2
    The key takeaway here is that you can still decouple logic while taking advantage of React's features. Since hooks, I've almost exclusively seen an 'all-in' approach where all service/application logic is coupled to React via custom hooks/providers. An example like this proves you can migrate from some other technology (Angular would be very appropriate here) to React cleanly and also migrate await from React just as easily.
    – GHOST-34
    Commented Feb 11, 2022 at 18:11
  • Can you please explain how to get the 'access_token' variable while declaring the axios instance? Commented Jul 22, 2022 at 7:57
  • 1
    @PavelHoryna I've changed the code, the token was already being set inside the useEffect. Commented Jul 22, 2022 at 14:30

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