I do lots of string concatenation in code and then I display output. I was wondering if there is any difference between following two codes:

string concat

$str = '';
for($x =0; $x <= 10000; $x++):
    $str .= 'I am string '. $x . "\n";
endforeach;

Output buffering

 ob_start();
 for($x =0; $x <= 10000; $x++):
    echo 'I am string ', $x , "\n";
 endforeach;
 $str = ob_get_contents();
 ob_end_flush();
  • 5
    Why not benchmark it yourself? – Kerrek SB Aug 4 '11 at 0:08
  • .07 vs .05 secounds – user557846 Aug 4 '11 at 0:20
  • 7
    The real answer: "Who cares?" Unless you're writing out massive strings, this will never compare to the performance of other parts of your like reading from the database, the file system, or basically any sort of IO. – Brendan Long Aug 4 '11 at 0:28
  • 3
    @Brendan, I am adding HTML in articles, and most of the articles are more than 2000 words. I was thinking concatenating large string may consume good memory and Hans answer proved that. – Maximus Aug 4 '11 at 0:39
  • @jason: Assuming 8 letters as the average length of a word, you're looking at 15 KB of memory usage for a couple milliseconds: google.com/search?q=2000+*+8+bytes – Brendan Long Aug 4 '11 at 0:43
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's a benchmark for you:

<?php

$test_1_start = microtime();

$str = '';
for ( $x = 0; $x <= 10000; $x++ ) {
    $str .= 'I am string ' . $x . "\n";
}

$test_1_end = microtime();
unset($str);
echo 'String concatenation: ' . ( $test_1_end - $test_1_start ) . ' seconds';

$test_2_start = microtime();

ob_start();
for ( $x = 0; $x <= 10000; $x++ ) {
    echo 'I am string ', $x, "\n";
}
$str = ob_get_contents();
ob_end_clean();

$test_2_end = microtime();

echo "\nOutput buffering: " . ( $test_2_end - $test_2_start ) . ' seconds';

?>

My results:

$ php -v
PHP 5.3.4 (cli) (built: Dec 15 2010 12:15:07) 
Copyright (c) 1997-2010 The PHP Group
Zend Engine v2.3.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2010 Zend Technologies
$ php test.php
String concatenation: 0.003932 seconds
Output buffering: 0.002841 seconds%
$ php test.php
String concatenation: 0.004179 seconds
Output buffering: 0.002796 seconds%
$ php test.php
String concatenation: 0.006768 seconds
Output buffering: 0.002849 seconds%
$ php test.php
String concatenation: 0.004925 seconds
Output buffering: 0.002764 seconds%
$ php test.php
String concatenation: 0.004066 seconds
Output buffering: 0.002792 seconds%
$ php test.php
String concatenation: 0.004049 seconds
Output buffering: 0.002837 seconds%

Looks like output buffering + echo is consistently faster, at least in the CLI / on my machine.

Brendan Long made a good point in his comment, however — there is such a minor performance difference here that a choice of one or the other is not much of an issue.

  • Hans I am going to test it with large string. Thanks for benchmark. – Maximus Aug 4 '11 at 0:41

I've made a benchmark, using OB is faster.

String: 0.003571 seconds
Output Buffer: 0.003053 seconds
StringBuilder (custom class Java/C#-Like): 0.050148 seconds
Array and Implode: 0.006248 seconds
  • most of us seem to get it the other way around, OB faster – user557846 Aug 4 '11 at 0:28
  • Really, OB Faster. I've edited my answer. My stopwatch had a little bug. – armandomiani Aug 4 '11 at 0:34
  • I'm curious is yout StringBuilder implemented? – wistoft Dec 22 '16 at 16:08
  • Hello @wistoft, it was, but 5 years later I don't remember where is it :( – armandomiani Dec 22 '16 at 18:29

at the first codes you write, you assign a string which will be kept until you unset the variable. It will stay in memory.

at the second one; op_start is to buffer the output. Until you end it, it will be stored in a buffer. ob end will send the ouput from the script and buffer will be cleaned.

instead of using variables or another thing; if you dont need to do anything with the output later, just use echo and free the memory. Don't use unnecessary variables.

another advantage of ob_start is that you can use it with a callback.

See here http://php.net/manual/en/function.ob-start.php

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