146

Is it possible to draw circle using css only which can work on most of the browsers (IE,Mozilla,Safari) ?

2

6 Answers 6

243

Yep, draw a box and give it a border radius that is half the width of the box:

#circle {
    background: #f00;
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    border-radius: 50%;
}

Working demo:

http://jsfiddle.net/DsW9h/1/

#circle {
    background: #f00;
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    border-radius: 50%;
}
<div id="circle"></div>

6
  • 6
    I am using IE8, and this demo does not work. It shows a red square.
    – adam
    Commented May 22, 2012 at 19:23
  • 3
    IE8 does not support border-radius, so that makes sense... Great idea for modern browsers though, very cool... Commented Feb 8, 2013 at 14:37
  • 39
    Instead of supporting IE8 please ask your clients if you can show a message telling the user to upgrade their browser. It will benefit everyone, and Microsoft recommends it. Google even discontinued IE8 support in their web apps (Gmail, Calendar, Drive, Docs, etc.) at the end of 2012. It's ridiculous to support a 5 year old browser.
    – Gavin
    Commented Sep 12, 2013 at 10:08
  • 2
    use a polyfille for ie8 css3pie.com and use border-radius:100%; for responsive circle use padding-bottom:40%; width:40%; height:0; overflow:visible;
    – fearis
    Commented Jun 29, 2015 at 17:20
  • 2
    this doesn't work well if the circle is really really small
    – Atav32
    Commented Aug 28, 2015 at 0:14
177

You could use a .before with a content with a unicode symbol for a circle (25CF).

.circle:before {
  content: ' \25CF';
  font-size: 200px;
}
<span class="circle"></span>

I suggest this as border-radius won't work in IE8 and below (I recognize the fact that the suggestion is a bit mental).

4
  • 4
    :before doesn't work in IE7 and below, so this method only gains support for IE8 but makes it very hard to position the circle correcly. For example, font-size of 200px doesn't equate to a circle with a diameter of 200px and you lose antialiasing on some systems. Commented Aug 4, 2011 at 8:02
  • Maybe also we can set margin: -0.5em -0.3em -0.3em -0.1em Commented Nov 30, 2012 at 12:41
  • 1
    Given that at this point, IE 8 is nearly 10 years old, this should no longer be the accepted answer. It is reasonable to drop support for it, as according to caniuse.com/usage-table, IE 8 currently has a 0.18% share of usage, and most modern websites have done so. The border-radius property is now supported pretty much across the board (caniuse.com/#search=border-radius), so should be the accepted answer.
    – bjg222
    Commented Aug 24, 2018 at 22:19
  • is there a way to appease the SEO gods, even if i use an image of circular text, instead of rotating each letter?
    – oldboy
    Commented Oct 19, 2020 at 8:21
52
  • Create a div with a set height and width (so, for a circle, use the same height and width), forming a square
  • add a border-radius of 50% which will make it circular in shape. (note: no prefix has been required for a long time)
  • You can then play around with background-color / gradients / (even pseudo elements) to create something like this:

.red {
  background-color: red;
}
.green {
  background-color: green;
}
.blue {
  background-color: blue;
}
.yellow {
  background-color: yellow;
}
.sphere {
  height: 200px;
  width: 200px;
  border-radius: 50%;
  text-align: center;
  vertical-align: middle;
  font-size: 500%;
  position: relative;
  box-shadow: inset -10px -10px 100px #000, 10px 10px 20px black, inset 0px 0px 10px black;
  display: inline-block;
  margin: 5%;
}
.sphere::after {
  background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3);
  content: '';
  height: 45%;
  width: 12%;
  position: absolute;
  top: 4%;
  left: 15%;
  border-radius: 50%;
  transform: rotate(40deg);
}
<div class="sphere red"></div>
<div class="sphere green"></div>
<div class="sphere blue"></div>
<div class="sphere yellow"></div>
<div class="sphere"></div>

6
  • 3
    pretty awesome gradients
    – Atav32
    Commented Aug 28, 2015 at 0:16
  • 1
    @Atav32: thanks! It's actually done using multiple box shadows :)
    – jbutler483
    Commented Aug 28, 2015 at 10:34
  • 1
    thank you @degenerate ! I hope you well on your CSS journey :)
    – jbutler483
    Commented Jul 15, 2016 at 16:20
  • 1
    I was going to post an angry reply saying that it's the same answer as Tatu's but then I clicked "Run Code".... #micdrop
    – NickG
    Commented Sep 15, 2016 at 15:58
  • 1
    thanks @NickG I appreciate it :)
    – jbutler483
    Commented Sep 15, 2016 at 20:37
15

border radius is good option, if struggling with old IE versions then try HTML codes

&#8226;

and use css to change color. Output:

11

This will work in all browsers

#circle {
    background: #f00;
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    border-radius: 50%;
    -moz-border-radius: 50%;
    -webkit-border-radius: 50%;
}
9

yup.. here's my code:

<style>
  .circle{
     width: 100px;
     height: 100px;
     border-radius: 50%;
     background-color: blue
  }
</style>
<div class="circle">
</div>

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