269

I need to extract the full protocol, domain, and port from a given URL. For example:

https://localhost:8181/ContactUs-1.0/contact?lang=it&report_type=consumer
>>>
https://localhost:8181
  • 9
    For those readers looking for an answer where the URL is not the current location, look below the accepted answer – Guy Schalnat Jun 8 '15 at 19:56

16 Answers 16

134

first get the current address

var url = window.location.href

Then just parse that string

var arr = url.split("/");

your url is:

var result = arr[0] + "//" + arr[2]

Hope this helps

  • 186
    -1, location.protocol is less hacky – naugtur May 28 '13 at 7:59
  • 8
    This works with URL string where location object is not available(js outside browser!) – Thamme Gowda Nov 26 '14 at 6:03
  • David Calhoun's answer uses the built-in parser (like location) but can be used for any url. Check it out it's neat. – Stijn de Witt Nov 14 '16 at 21:33
  • 4
    Or just turn it into a one-liner: window.location.href.split('/').slice(0, 3).join('/') – Ryan McGeary May 16 '17 at 19:35
  • 2
    window.location.origin – int soumen Nov 30 '18 at 19:03
523
var full = location.protocol+'//'+location.hostname+(location.port ? ':'+location.port: '');
  • 3
    @Randomblue What about it? You will get about://. However, I am curious to know, what would be the use case for about:blank? I am not sure if any browser injects plugin resources in about:blank, but seems like that could be the only use case. – Shef Sep 2 '12 at 6:27
  • 37
    I find my javascript never loads when I visit about:blank... – toxaq Nov 12 '12 at 22:55
  • 2
    This doesn't work at all if you have a URL string, right? (i.e. you need to be at location for this to work) – Nick T Oct 5 '15 at 22:57
  • 1
    Sorry for the late reply, @NickT. Yes, it does't do that. Please, use the nice solution provided by David for that. – Shef Oct 7 '15 at 16:37
  • 13
    Can't you use location.host instead of location.hostname + location.port? – c24w Sep 20 '16 at 14:28
157

None of these answers seem to completely address the question, which calls for an arbitrary url, not specifically the url of the current page.

Method 1: Use the URL API (caveat: no IE11 support)

You can use the URL API (not supported by IE11, but available everywhere else).

This also makes it easy to access search params. Another bonus: it can be used in a Web Worker since it doesn't depend on the DOM.

const url = new URL('http://example.com:12345/blog/foo/bar?startIndex=1&pageSize=10');

Method 2 (old way): Use the browser's built-in parser in the DOM

Use this if you need this to work on older browsers as well.

//  Create an anchor element (note: no need to append this element to the document)
const url = document.createElement('a');
//  Set href to any path
url.setAttribute('href', 'http://example.com:12345/blog/foo/bar?startIndex=1&pageSize=10');

That's it!

The browser's built-in parser has already done its job. Now you can just grab the parts you need (note that this works for both methods above):

//  Get any piece of the url you're interested in
url.hostname;  //  'example.com'
url.port;      //  12345
url.search;    //  '?startIndex=1&pageSize=10'
url.pathname;  //  '/blog/foo/bar'
url.protocol;  //  'http:'

Bonus: Search params

Chances are you'll probably want to break apart the search url params as well, since '?startIndex=1&pageSize=10' isn't too useable on its own.

If you used Method 1 (URL API) above, you simply use the searchParams getters:

url.searchParams.get('searchIndex');  // '1'

Or to get all parameters:

Array
    .from(url.searchParams)
    .reduce((accum, [key, val]) => {
        accum[key] = val;
        return accum;
    }, {});
// -> { startIndex: '1', pageSize: '10' }

If you used Method 2 (the old way), you can use something like this:

// Simple object output (note: does NOT preserve duplicate keys).
var params = url.search.substr(1); // remove '?' prefix
params
    .split('&')
    .reduce((accum, keyval) => {
        const [key, val] = keyval.split('=');
        accum[key] = val;
        return accum;
    }, {});
// -> { startIndex: '1', pageSize: '10' }
  • link.protocol gets me a "http:" if i inspect a anker with "google.com" :-( var link = document.createElement('a'); link.setAttribute('href', 'google.com'); console.log(link.protocol) – eXe Sep 26 '16 at 12:35
  • Are you doing that on a http page perhaps? If not specified it will 'inherit' from the current location – Stijn de Witt Nov 14 '16 at 21:24
  • 3
    This is a fantastic answer and should get more votes, because this answer is not limited to just the current location but works for any url, and because this answer utilizes the browser's built-in parser instead of building one ourselves (which we can't hope to do as well or as fast!). – Stijn de Witt Nov 14 '16 at 21:26
  • Thank you for this clever trick! I would like to add one thing: There is both host and hostname. The former includes the port (e.g. localhost:3000), while the latter is only the host's name (e.g. localhost). – codener Mar 31 '17 at 11:30
  • This works well in case of absolute URL. It fails in case of Relative URL and cross-browser. Any suggestions? – Gururaj Aug 4 '17 at 12:42
118

For some reason all the answers are all overkills. This is all it takes:

window.location.origin

More details can be found here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/window.location#Properties

50

As has already been mentioned there is the as yet not fully supported window.location.origin but instead of either using it or creating a new variable to use, I prefer to check for it and if it isn't set to set it.

For example;

if (!window.location.origin) {
  window.location.origin = window.location.protocol + "//" + window.location.hostname + (window.location.port ? ':' + window.location.port: '');
}

I actually wrote about this a few months back A fix for window.location.origin

  • 1
    This is first time that I know window.location.origin is exists. Thank you. ^^ – EThaizone Jo Apr 8 '17 at 9:34
30

host

var url = window.location.host;

returns localhost:2679

hostname

var url = window.location.hostname;

returns localhost

13

The protocol property sets or returns the protocol of the current URL, including the colon (:).

This means that if you want to get only the HTTP/HTTPS part you can do something like this:

var protocol = window.location.protocol.replace(/:/g,'')

For the domain you can use:

var domain = window.location.hostname;

For the port you can use:

var port = window.location.port;

Keep in mind that the port will be an empty string if it is not visible in the URL. For example:

If you need to show 80/443 when you have no port use

var port = window.location.port || (protocol === 'https' ? '443' : '80');
12

window.location.origin will be enough to get the same.

  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer... – ebu_sho Dec 10 '18 at 10:04
  • Thank you ebu_sho. – int soumen Feb 18 at 7:27
  • 1
    That solved my problem easily. Thank you @intsoumen – Turker Tunali Mar 25 at 9:49
  • 1
    agree! works like magic – YanivN Apr 11 at 12:37
6

Indeed, window.location.origin works fine in browsers following standards, but guess what. IE isn't following standards.

So because of that, this is what worked for me in IE, FireFox and Chrome:

var full = location.protocol+'//'+location.hostname+(location.port ? ':'+location.port: '');

but for possible future enhancements which could cause conflicts, I specified the "window" reference before the "location" object.

var full = window.location.protocol+'//'+window.location.hostname+(window.location.port ? ':'+window.location.port: '');
2
var http = location.protocol;
var slashes = http.concat("//");
var host = slashes.concat(window.location.hostname);
2
var getBasePath = function(url) {
    var r = ('' + url).match(/^(https?:)?\/\/[^/]+/i);
    return r ? r[0] : '';
};
  • 2
    consider explaining your answer. Don't assume the OP can understand the significance of the different parts of your code. – ADyson Sep 9 '16 at 10:00
2

Try use a regular expression (Regex), which will be quite useful when you want to validate / extract stuff or even do some simple parsing in javascript.

The regex is :

/([a-zA-Z]+):\/\/([\-\w\.]+)(?:\:(\d{0,5}))?/

Demonstration:

function breakURL(url){

     matches = /([a-zA-Z]+):\/\/([\-\w\.]+)(?:\:(\d{0,5}))?/.exec(url);

     foo = new Array();

     if(matches){
          for( i = 1; i < matches.length ; i++){ foo.push(matches[i]); }
     }

     return foo
}

url = "https://www.google.co.uk:55699/search?q=http%3A%2F%2F&oq=http%3A%2F%2F&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60l3j69i65l2.2342j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8"


breakURL(url);       // [https, www.google.co.uk, 55699] 
breakURL();          // []
breakURL("asf");     // []
breakURL("asd://");  // []
breakURL("asd://a"); // [asd, a, undefined]

Now you can do validation as well.

0

ES6 style with configurable parameters.

/**
 * Get the current URL from `window` context object.
 * Will return the fully qualified URL if neccessary:
 *   getCurrentBaseURL(true, false) // `http://localhost/` - `https://localhost:3000/`
 *   getCurrentBaseURL(true, true) // `http://www.example.com` - `https://www.example.com:8080`
 *   getCurrentBaseURL(false, true) // `www.example.com` - `localhost:3000`
 *
 * @param {boolean} [includeProtocol=true]
 * @param {boolean} [removeTrailingSlash=false]
 * @returns {string} The current base URL.
 */
export const getCurrentBaseURL = (includeProtocol = true, removeTrailingSlash = false) => {
  if (!window || !window.location || !window.location.hostname || !window.location.protocol) {
    console.error(
      `The getCurrentBaseURL function must be called from a context in which window object exists. Yet, window is ${window}`,
      [window, window.location, window.location.hostname, window.location.protocol],
    )
    throw new TypeError('Whole or part of window is not defined.')
  }

  const URL = `${includeProtocol ? `${window.location.protocol}//` : ''}${window.location.hostname}${
    window.location.port ? `:${window.location.port}` : ''
  }${removeTrailingSlash ? '' : '/'}`

  // console.log(`The URL is ${URL}`)

  return URL
}
0

window.location.protocol + '//' + window.location.host

0

Simple answer that works for all browsers:

let origin;

if (!window.location.origin) {
  origin = window.location.protocol + "//" + window.location.hostname + 
     (window.location.port ? ':' + window.location.port: '');
}

origin = window.location.origin;
0

Here is the solution I'm using:

const result = `${ window.location.protocol }//${ window.location.host }`;

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