109

I'm trying to get https working on my localhost environment for Vite. Chrome shows an invalid certificate error.

I've set up my vite.config.js file like this:

import { defineConfig  } from 'vite'
import vue from '@vitejs/plugin-vue'
import fs from 'fs';

export default defineConfig({
  resolve: { alias: { '@': '/src' } },
  plugins: [vue()],
  https: {
    key: fs.readFileSync('RootCA-key.pem'),
    cert: fs.readFileSync('RootCA.pem')
  }
})

and when I run npm run dev -- --https it works as expected, I don't get any issues from Vite. However, Chrome shows an invalid certificate.

I used openssl to create the cert files, which gave me .crt, .pem, and .key files. None of them are binary, so I renamed the .key file as RootCA-key.pem. I've tried using the RootCA.pem file as the cert, as well as renaming the RootCA.crt file to RootCA-cert.pem and using that as the cert.

As a temporary work-around, I've enabled insecure localhost in Chrome (chrome://flags/#allow-insecure-localhost), which at least gets rid of the warning.

3
  • 3
    Self-signed certs are invalid by default. You'll have to manually trust the certificate.
    – tony19
    Oct 5, 2021 at 4:14
  • Unless you create and trust your own root CA in the local Browsers. And that is exactly where one wants vite to serve ones own self signed certs so that Chrome and co do not come up with the security question.
    – norman
    Sep 17, 2022 at 16:08
  • 1
    @hyphen: The example you provide has a mistake you might want to fix (at least for vite 3): the 'https' options under the keys 'server' or 'preview'.
    – norman
    Sep 17, 2022 at 16:17

8 Answers 8

172

Easiest way is to use the vite-plugin-mkcert package.

npm i vite-plugin-mkcert -D

vite.config.js

import { defineConfig } from 'vite'
import mkcert from 'vite-plugin-mkcert'

export default defineConfig({
  server: { https: true }, // Not needed for Vite 5+
  plugins: [ mkcert() ]
})

When you run the local vite dev server you may be prompted for your password the first time. It will then install a local certificate onto your system and to a number of installed browsers.

Easy!

8
  • I'm using this in combination with laravel sail, but my container won't start anymore due to network failures Jul 12, 2022 at 6:56
  • 2
    Thanks, solved my problem. Spent 12hrs+ trying to troubleshoot ERR_SSL_PROTOCOL_ERROR error before I came across this. Jan 2, 2023 at 1:37
  • It also blocks the hosting of the vue application to your local network.npm run dev -- --host is not making application anymore accessible.
    – Tun Kapgen
    Apr 17, 2023 at 21:46
  • 1
    This package is now referenced in the official Vite docs main.vitejs.dev/guide/… Nov 8, 2023 at 3:13
  • 1
    I used this and worked for me. Thanks Nov 28, 2023 at 7:48
148

The Vite documentation suggest using their official package instead: @vitejs/plugin-basic-ssl

Documentation: https://vitejs.dev/config/server-options.html#server-https

You need to install it with

npm install -D @vitejs/plugin-basic-ssl

And then use it like this in your vite.config.ts:

import basicSsl from '@vitejs/plugin-basic-ssl'

export default {
  plugins: [
    basicSsl()
  ]
}

⚠️ This is for your dev environment, don't use this on production. You need your own certificate in production (using nginx and let's encrypt for example).

9
  • 4
    Chrome says certificate is not valid when using this Aug 30, 2022 at 9:59
  • 5
    @JulienReszka It's a local certificate, so yes, chrome can't verify it, and you need to manually approve it. Click on "Advanced parameters" on the error page, then "Continue toward 127.0.0.1".
    – Herobrine
    Aug 31, 2022 at 10:18
  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer, as it works perfectly for a dev environment and it's actually suggested by the documentation. Production - wise, it's another story.
    – venir
    Sep 5, 2022 at 10:06
  • 6
    They actually DON'T recommend doing this. They recommend using your own certificate, according to the linked page. Sep 5, 2022 at 22:08
  • 2
    Mac users: for Chrome you can type 'thisisunsafe' to bypass, Safari, you need to paste the URL of the Vite server into the main window then use the options Safari gives you to bypass the security warnings. Note that while @vitejs/plugin-basic-ssl worked, vite-plugin-mkcert didn't. Feb 23, 2023 at 18:52
56

Maybe it's the key and cert files that are the issue. I am using the mkcert library with the same options and it works fine for me. Moreover, no need to manually trust the certificates.

You can follow these steps:

# Step: 1
# Install mkcert tool - macOS; you can see the mkcert repo for details
brew install mkcert

# Step: 2
# Install nss (only needed if you use Firefox)
brew install nss

# Step: 3
# Setup mkcert on your machine (creates a CA)
mkcert -install

# Step: 4 (Final)
# at the project root directory run the following command
mkdir -p .cert && mkcert -key-file ./.cert/key.pem -cert-file ./.cert/cert.pem 'localhost'

And update your vite.config.js with

import { defineConfig } from 'vite';
import react from '@vitejs/plugin-react';
import fs from 'fs';

// https://vitejs.dev/config/
export default defineConfig({
  server: {
    https: {
      key: fs.readFileSync('./.cert/key.pem'),
      cert: fs.readFileSync('./.cert/cert.pem'),
    },
  },
  plugins: [react()],
});

The above steps should solve the HTTPS issue while running yarn dev to start the dev server.

Additional: I use an npm script to make it easy for my team members to create the certificates.

// in package.json
"scripts": {
    "dev": "vite",
    "build": "tsc && vite build",
    "serve": "vite preview",

    "cert": "rm -rf .cert && mkdir -p .cert && mkcert -key-file ./.cert/key.pem -cert-file ./.cert/cert.pem 'localhost'"

  },

5
  • 3
    Because I overlooked this for quite a while: Make sure you don't accidentally use vite's basicSsl() at the same time. In that case vite will never serve your own certificates and always generate an adhoc cert. After I got rid of that my openssl 3.x certs worked fine with vite.
    – norman
    Sep 17, 2022 at 16:13
  • 2
    this worked for me as of June 8th 2023 :) even in brave Jun 8, 2023 at 5:46
  • note that if you use a custom server this won't work.
    – Jamie
    Jun 26, 2023 at 13:16
  • 1
    Works for Windows too. Install mkcert with chocolatey. A little tweaking to the mkcert command to avoid issues with slashes and localhost needs to be in double quotes. mkdir .cert && cd .cert && mkcert -key-file key.pem -cert-file cert.pem "localhost"
    – isimmons
    Sep 6, 2023 at 15:10
  • 1
    Clean, dependency free (other than having mkcert) solution for vice. Jan 4 at 16:12
6

Daniel Elkington's answer above worked like a charm for me on macOS. However it did not work for me for a Vue/Vite inside a Docker container.

This approach below worked for me (both on macOS and inside a Docker container):

Got things working (by re-)using key and cert files I'd generated for localhost using mkcert, e.g.:

// vite.config.js
import { fileURLToPath, URL } from "node:url";

import { defineConfig } from "vite";
import vue from "@vitejs/plugin-vue";

// https://vitejs.dev/config/
export default defineConfig({
  server: {
    https: {
      key: '/path/to/some_folder/ssl/SSLforMyHosts-key.pem',
      cert: '/path/to/some_folder/ssl/SSLforMyHosts-certificate.pem',
    }
  },
  plugins: [
    vue(),
  ],
  resolve: {
    alias: {
      "@": fileURLToPath(new URL("./src", import.meta.url)),
    },
  },
});

The key and cert files were generated for localhost (and more test domains for local development) using mkcert, with this command:

cd /Users/your_name/some_folder/ssl
mkcert \
  -cert-file SSLforMyHosts-certificate.pem -key-file SSLforMyHosts-key.pem \
  localhost 127.0.0.1 ::1 \
  some-other-local-dev-site.localhost \
  example.localhost

See also: answer about installing self-signed certificate.

1

if you have created local certificate using mkcert then you can use the following config:

vite.config.js (using vue@3)

Remember to change the certificate filename if you intend to copypase the code.

import { fileURLToPath, URL } from 'node:url'

import { defineConfig } from 'vite'
import vue from '@vitejs/plugin-vue'
import vueJsx from '@vitejs/plugin-vue-jsx'
import fs from 'fs';
// https://vitejs.dev/config/
export default defineConfig({
  server: {
    https: {
            key:  fs.readFileSync("../localhost+2-key.pem"),
            cert: fs.readFileSync("../localhost+2.pem"),
            ca: fs.readFileSync("../.local/share/mkcert/rootCA.pem")

        },
      port: 8080
},
  plugins: [vue(), vueJsx()],
  resolve: {
    alias: {
      '@': fileURLToPath(new URL('./src', import.meta.url))
    }
  }
})
1

To handle certs for localhost and local IPs there is this super-easy-to-use plugin:

https://github.com/liuweiGL/vite-plugin-mkcert

import {defineConfig} from'vite'
import mkcert from'vite-plugin-mkcert'

// https://vitejs.dev/config/
export default defineConfig({
  server: {
    https: true
  },
  plugins: [mkcert()]
})

You need to then transfer the rootCA.pem (generated by mkcert, findable with mkcert -CAROOT) file to your phone (personally I copied it to the public folder of my app and gitignored to the, downloaded it).

On Android, in Settings, search for Certificate, then add a CA one and select the downloaded rootCA.pem

On iPhone it's almost the same, downloading it will open a popup telling you to go to your settings where a new menu appear: https://github.com/FiloSottile/mkcert/issues/233#issuecomment-690110809

You can now access your app served on your computer, from your phones, on your local network, without any SSL error (and you can save your test credentials)!

It's the most simple / full featured solution I found to achieve local dev from a computer and phones

0

As an alternative solution, the answer in this post explains how to add the CA and cert to the server and to the browser: Getting Chrome to accept self-signed localhost certificate

For your vite config refer to Vite Docs - server.https, you would only need something like this:

server: {
    https: true
  }

or You could do it from the command line like this:

vite --https

or

npm run dev -- --https
3
0

For localhost development without need to trust self signed certificates.

File vite.config.js you may change whatever

import { defineConfig } from 'vite';
import backloopHttpsOptions from 'backloop.dev';

export default defineConfig({
  server: {
    port: 4443,
    host: 'whatever.backloop.dev',
    https: backloopHttpsOptions
  },
  // ... //
});
1
  • where does backloop come from? is it a package or a specific setup? I'm new to react and vite, so this answer is not very clear..
    – CobyC
    Apr 19 at 14:51

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