8

Am I doing this right?

I get a pointer to a native array and need to copy to a managed array. Use memcpy() with a pin_ptr.

unsigned char* pArray;
unsigned int arrayCount;
// get pArray & arrayCount (from a COM method) 

ManagedClass->ByteArray = gcnew array<Byte,1>(arrayCount)
pin_ptr<System::Byte> pinPtrArray = &ManagedClass->ByteArray[0];
memcpy_s(pinPtrArray, arrayCount, pArray, arrayCount);

arrayCount is the actual length of pArray, so not really worried about that aspect. Looked at the code and the array is copied from a vector. So I can set the managed array size safely.

1
  • spoke to a senior at work and he recommended using memcpy_s
    – Soppus
    Aug 5, 2011 at 9:03

2 Answers 2

12

That works, but isn't safe. You'll blow the garbage collected heap to smithereens when you get arrayCount wrong. Very hard to diagnose.

Marshal::Copy() is safe and just as fast.

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  • 2
    Marshal::Copy is NOT safe. Here's one example: stackoverflow.com/questions/6945998/… Aug 4, 2011 at 18:17
  • 2
    Getting an immediate AV from fumbling the native buffer size is not comparable to the misery caused by silent heap corruption. Aug 4, 2011 at 18:32
  • 1
    Hans: you do not always get an immediate AV. Marshal::Copy can corrupt the heap the same way as memcpy does. The calls are similar. Aug 4, 2011 at 18:35
  • 2
    No, some do NOT check. Read the documentation: Unmanaged, C-style arrays do not contain bounds information, which prevents the startIndex and length parameters from being validated. Thus, the unmanaged data corresponding to the source parameter populates the managed array regardless of its usefulness. You must initialize the managed array with the appropriate size before calling this method. Aug 4, 2011 at 19:18
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    No, you assume that pinning is for free. It is not. The CLR can do it without pinning. clr/src/vm/common.h, memcpyNoGCRefs() function. Aug 4, 2011 at 19:50
3

You are doing it almost right:

pin_ptr<Byte> pinPtrArray = &ManagedClass.ByteArray[ManagedClass.ByeArray->GetLowerBound(0)];

Marshal::Copy is not safe and not as fast. Always use pinned pointers in managed C++.

Edit: If you want to, you can check the length to make sure the memcpy won't exceed the bounds first, e.g.:

if (arrayCount > ManagedClass.ByteArray.Length)
    (throw Out of bounds copy exception)
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  • arrayCount is the actual length of pArray, so not really worried about that aspect. Looked at the code and the array is copied from a vector. So I can set the managed array size safely.
    – Soppus
    Aug 5, 2011 at 9:02
  • Good. I was just responding to the unreasonable doom-speak of Hans below, acting as if things like memcpy were evil. Sigh. Aug 5, 2011 at 15:15
  • @AresAvatar : memcpy isn't evil, but Hans is right -- Marshal::Copy is safer (and is not slower).
    – ildjarn
    Aug 10, 2011 at 20:31
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    @AresAvatar : The point is your calling Hans' answer "doom-speak" is unwarranted and incorrect.
    – ildjarn
    Aug 10, 2011 at 21:08
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    @AresAvatar : memcpy is just as safe IF you do the bounds checking AND you do it correctly. Marshal::Copy is thus safer (because it does these things for you) and shorter (because it does these things for you). In any case, I'm done trying to persuade you that any answer other than yours warrants any merit, or that your FUD is more harmful than not.
    – ildjarn
    Aug 10, 2011 at 21:18

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