16

I have a generics class that I used to write data to IsolatedStorage.

I can use an static implicit operator T() to convert from my Generic class to the Generic Parameter T

e.g.

MyClass<double> foo = new MyClass(187.0);

double t = foo;

My question is, how can I do the reverse?

MyClass<double> foo = new MyClass(187.0);
double t = 0.2d;
foo = t;

The implicit operator has to be static, so I'm not sure how I can pass in the instance of my class?

3
  • 1
    How are you defining the second implicit operator? It should look like a mirror image of the first (with the types reversed). Does that not work?
    – Kirk Woll
    Commented Aug 4, 2011 at 18:12
  • That works, but I was hoping to use a class method, instead of constructing a new object.
    – Alan
    Commented Aug 4, 2011 at 18:20
  • 1
    ok, but yeah, does not work that way. Type conversion should always produce a new instance of a type. (and really, those types should be immutable)
    – Kirk Woll
    Commented Aug 4, 2011 at 18:23

3 Answers 3

23

This class shows conversion between T and MyClass, both ways.

class MyClass<T>
{
  public MyClass(T val)
  {
     Value = val;
  }

  public T Value { get; set; }

  public static implicit operator MyClass<T>(T someValue)
  {
     return new MyClass<T>(someValue);
  }

  public static implicit operator T(MyClass<T> myClassInstance)
  {
     return myClassInstance.Value;
  }
}
1
9

EDIT:

If you want to be able to change the value of T in your class, I would recommend exposing it as a property like:

T Value { get; set; }

That will allow you to change the value, instead of the behavior of the implicit operator returning an entirely new instance of the class.


You can and can't using implicit operators. Doing something like

 public static implicit operator int(MyType m) 
 public static implicit operator MyType(int m) 

will implicitly convert from MyType to int and from int to MyType respectively. However, you're right, since they are static, the int to MyType specifically will have to create a new instance of MyType and return that.

So this code:

MyClass<double> foo = new MyClass(187.0);
double t = 0.2d;
foo = t;

wouldn't replace the value in foo with t, the implicit operator would return an entirely new MyClass from t and assign that to Foo.

2
  • To your edit, that's how I'm doing it today. I just thought it would be more slick to not use .Value everywhere.
    – Alan
    Commented Aug 4, 2011 at 18:50
  • 2
    I would use .Value everywhere. It keeps your code cleaner and more readable. Implicit operators are handy, but overuse can easily make your code difficult to read. You're doing it the right way. Commented Aug 4, 2011 at 18:53
1

You should be able to convert the other way by simply specifying another implicit operator:

public static implicit operator MyClass<T>(T input)
{
   return new MyClass<T>(input);
}

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