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For my research project I'm trying to distinguish between hydra plant (the larger amoeba looking oranges things) and their brine shrimp feed (the smaller orange specks) so that we can automate the cleaning of petri dishes using a pipetting machine. An example of a snap image from the machine of the petri dish looks like so:

sample image of fed dish

I have so far applied a circle mask and an orange color space mask to create a cleaned up image so that it's mostly just the shrimp and hydra.

cleaned up image

There is some residual light artifacts left in the filtered image, but I have to bite the cost or else I lose the resolution of the very thin hydra such as in the top left of the original image.

I was hoping to box and label the larger hydra plants but couldn't find much applicable literature for differentiating between large and small objects of similar attributes in an image, to achieve my goal.

I don't want to approach this using ML because I don't have the manpower or a large enough dataset to make a good training set, so I would truly appreciate some easier vision processing tools. I can afford to lose out on the skinny hydra, just if I can know of a simpler way to identify the more turgid, healthy hydra from the already cleaned up image that would be great.

I have seen some content about using openCV findCountours? Am I on the right track?

Attached is the code I have so you know what datatypes I'm working with.

import cv2
import os
import numpy as np
import PIL

#abspath = "/Users/johannpally/Documents/GitHub/HydraBot/vis_processing/hydra_sample_imgs/00049.jpg"
#note we are in the vis_processing folder already
#PIL.Image.open(path)

path = os.getcwd() + "/hydra_sample_imgs/00054.jpg"
img = cv2.imread(path)
c_img = cv2.imread(path)

#==============GEOMETRY MASKS===================
# start result mask with circle mask

ww, hh = img.shape[:2]
r = 173
xc = hh // 2
yc = ww // 2
cv2.circle(c_img, (xc - 10, yc + 2), r, (255, 255, 255), -1)
hsv_cir = cv2.cvtColor(c_img, cv2.COLOR_BGR2HSV)

l_w = np.array([0,0,0])
h_w = np.array([0,0,255])
result_mask = cv2.inRange(hsv_cir, l_w, h_w)

#===============COLOR MASKS====================
hsv_img = cv2.cvtColor(img, cv2.COLOR_BGR2HSV)

#(hMin = 7 , sMin = 66, vMin = 124), (hMax = 19 , sMax = 255, vMax = 237)
# Threshold of orange in HSV space output from the HSV picker tool
l_orange = np.array([7, 66, 125])
h_orange = np.array([19, 255, 240])
orange_mask = cv2.inRange(hsv_img, l_orange, h_orange)
orange_res = cv2.bitwise_and(img, img, mask = orange_mask)

#===============COMBINE MASKS====================
for i in range(len(result_mask)):
    for j in range(len(result_mask[i])):
        if result_mask[i][j] == 255 & orange_mask[i][j] == 255:
            result_mask[i][j] = 255
        else:
            result_mask[i][j] = 0

c_o_res = cv2.bitwise_and(img, img, mask=result_mask)
cv2.imshow('res', c_o_res)
cv2.waitKey(0)
cv2.destroyAllWindows()
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  • findContours, then filter using contourArea. that only works well for objects that don't touch/overlap. you might also need some morphology operations (erode/dilate/open/close). Oct 9, 2021 at 12:37
  • BTW, that double loop can be replaced by result_mask &= orange_mask, assuming both are masks (only contain 0 and 255) -- python syntax: the & (integers) in the if-expression ought to be and (boolean) Oct 9, 2021 at 12:43
  • Thank you Christoph, will note about the double for loop. Oct 12, 2021 at 5:11
  • @JohannPally you can try switching to LAB color space and analyse the individual channels. You won't have to manually set a range in this case
    – Jeru Luke
    May 5 at 20:51

1 Answer 1

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You are on the right track, but I have to be honest. Without DeepLearning you will get good results but not perfect.

That's what I managed to get using contours:

Code:

import cv2
import os
import numpy as np
import PIL

#abspath = "/Users/johannpally/Documents/GitHub/HydraBot/vis_processing/hydra_sample_imgs/00049.jpg"
#note we are in the vis_processing folder already
#PIL.Image.open(path)

path = os.getcwd() + "/hydra_sample_imgs/00054.jpg"
img = cv2.imread(path)
c_img = cv2.imread(path)

#==============GEOMETRY MASKS===================
# start result mask with circle mask

ww, hh = img.shape[:2]
r = 173
xc = hh // 2
yc = ww // 2
cv2.circle(c_img, (xc - 10, yc + 2), r, (255, 255, 255), -1)
hsv_cir = cv2.cvtColor(c_img, cv2.COLOR_BGR2HSV)

l_w = np.array([0,0,0])
h_w = np.array([0,0,255])
result_mask = cv2.inRange(hsv_cir, l_w, h_w)

#===============COLOR MASKS====================
hsv_img = cv2.cvtColor(img, cv2.COLOR_BGR2HSV)

#(hMin = 7 , sMin = 66, vMin = 124), (hMax = 19 , sMax = 255, vMax = 237)
# Threshold of orange in HSV space output from the HSV picker tool
l_orange = np.array([7, 66, 125])
h_orange = np.array([19, 255, 240])
orange_mask = cv2.inRange(hsv_img, l_orange, h_orange)
orange_res = cv2.bitwise_and(img, img, mask = orange_mask)

#===============COMBINE MASKS====================
for i in range(len(result_mask)):
    for j in range(len(result_mask[i])):
        if result_mask[i][j] == 255 & orange_mask[i][j] == 255:
            result_mask[i][j] = 255
        else:
            result_mask[i][j] = 0

c_o_res = cv2.bitwise_and(img, img, mask=result_mask)

# We have to use gray image (1 Channel) to use cv2.findContours
gray = cv2.cvtColor(c_o_res, cv2.COLOR_RGB2GRAY)

contours, _ = cv2.findContours(gray, cv2.RETR_TREE, cv2.CHAIN_APPROX_NONE)

minAreaSize = 150
for contour in contours:
    if cv2.contourArea(contour) > minAreaSize:

        # -------- UPDATE 1 CODE --------
        # Rectangle Bounding box Drawing Option
        # rect = cv2.boundingRect(contour)
        # x, y, w, h = rect
        # cv2.rectangle(img, (x, y), (x + w, y + h), (0, 255, 0), 2)
        
        # FINDING CONTOURS CENTERS
        M = cv2.moments(contour)
        cX = int(M["m10"] / M["m00"])
        cY = int(M["m01"] / M["m00"])
        # DRAW CENTERS
        cv2.circle(img, (cX, cY), radius=0, color=(255, 0, 255), thickness=5)
        # -------- END OF UPDATE 1 CODE --------

        # DRAW
        cv2.drawContours(img, contour, -1, (0, 255, 0), 1)


cv2.imshow('FinallyResult', img)

cv2.imshow('res', c_o_res)
cv2.waitKey(0)
cv2.destroyAllWindows()

Update 1:

To find the center of the contours we can use cv2.moments. The code was edited with # -------- UPDATE 1 CODE -------- comment inside the for loop. As I mentioned before, this is not perfect approach and maybe there is a way to improve my answer to find the centers of the hydras without DeepLearning.

3
  • Got it, thanks for the advice and code. One note, I would need to literally 'box' the hydra to get the x y coords for the pipette to go down to. Although contours highlight where the hydra are, is there a way to display the 'centers' of the contours found? Oct 12, 2021 at 5:12
  • @JohannPally If you are pleased with my answer I would like to get the confirmation answer with the "V" sign button next to my answer (on the left), I wasn't sure if you know about that. About the centers of the contours, I have updated my answer for you, but you can try to ask a new question (in a new post) about that and maybe someone could improve my answer. Good Luck!!
    – Roy Amoyal
    Oct 12, 2021 at 10:57
  • 1
    Thanks for the help Roy! Oct 12, 2021 at 17:14

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