I have a very simple piece of code below which I think gives the wrong result from a user's perspective.

package com.test.sample;
public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        float c,d;

        c = (float) 12.47;
        d = (float) 12.44;
        d = c - d;

        System.out.println("Hello the calculated value of a=" + d);
    }

}

The output is Hello the calculated value of a=0.030000687

But I want a=0.030000000 which is the perfect value.

  • 4
    Welcome to the wonders of floating point numbers! And if you're really interested, you should read this: download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E19957-01/806-3568/… – Fred Aug 5 '11 at 6:39
  • float is nearest possible representation in binary... it can't be exact, so imperfection. The accumulating error finally doomed The Matrix, you know. – Nishant Aug 5 '11 at 6:39
  • 2
    Look Machine Precision it's not Java specific. – Nishant Aug 5 '11 at 6:40
  • Thanks.. But any solution ? – Vins Aug 5 '11 at 6:42
  • @Fred, that's also the same link I provided. – Buhake Sindi Aug 5 '11 at 6:47
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Floating point arithmetic, what developers should know.

The JVM implements the IEEE-754 1985 floating point standard and it has its accuracy problem (since floating point numbers cannot precisely represent all real numbers).

If you seek accuracy, use java.math.BigDecimal object instead.


Update: This is how I took your example and used BigDecimal to achieve your expected result:

import java.math.BigDecimal;

/**
 * @author The Elite Gentleman
 *
 */
public class BigDecimalTest {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        BigDecimal a = new BigDecimal(Float.toString(12.47f));
        BigDecimal b = new BigDecimal(Float.toString(12.44f));
        BigDecimal c = a.subtract(b);
        System.out.println(c);
    }
}
  • So whats the solution for this ?? – Vins Aug 5 '11 at 6:47
  • 1
    +1 for a solution. Many people just go 'floating point is inaccurate, read this' – Fred Aug 5 '11 at 6:49
  • 1
    @Fred, true, hence why we are here. To provide solution (and get better rep) :-) – Buhake Sindi Aug 5 '11 at 7:01
  • Hey i did this change public static void main(String[] args) { float c,d; c=(float)12.47; d=(float)12.44; BigDecimal a = new BigDecimal(12.47); BigDecimal b = new BigDecimal(12.44); b= a.subtract(b); System.out.println(" Now BigDecimal vlue ==" +b); } But the output Now BigDecimal vlue ==0.0300000000000011368683772161602973937988281250000 – Vins Aug 5 '11 at 7:09
  • But i need only .03 – Vins Aug 5 '11 at 7:09

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