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I know that ejabberd server is efficient and designed for high performance and fault tolerance but i don't understand why i see that it's listeners modules handle connections sequentially, in the Joe Armestrong's book i see that parallel servers works like this :

{ok, Listen}=gen_tcp:listen(....),
spawn(fun() ->parallel(Listen) end).

parallel(Listen) ->
{ok, Socket}=gen_tcp:accept(Listen),
spawn(fun() ->parallel(Listen) end),
handling(Socket).

handling(Socket) ->
....

But in EJABBERD listener named ejabberd_listener.erl the mechanism of listening is simple :a supervisor had workers children and each child represents a module listener with it's listening options (port, network protocole, ip,...) , there are 4 or 5 children and all children run one of two functions at start : TCP or UDP and this last represents the listen function for incoming connections, and when a connection is accepted and a Socket is created, the listener passed the Socket as an argument to the start function of the Module and continue to accept other connections, the most important part of code is :

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

init_tcp(PortIP, Module, Opts, SockOpts, Port, IPS) ->

%% Some of work
.... 

ListenSocket = listen_tcp(PortIP, Module, SockOpts, Port, IPS), 

%% Some of work
.... 

accept(ListenSocket, Module,.... ), 

%% Some of work
.... 

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

listen_tcp(....) ->

Res = gen_tcp:listen(....),

%% Some of work
.... 

case Res of {ok, ListenSocket} ->Listensocket;

%% Some of work
.... 

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

accept(ListenSocket, Module,... ) ->

case gen_tcp:accept(ListenSocket) of
    {ok, Socket} ->

%% Some of work
....

Module:start(....,Socket,....),

%% Some of work
.... 

accept(ListenSocket, Module,.... );

It's very clear that this is a sequential listener and it runs slower than parallel, so why they don't use the parallel mechanism for more efficiency and performance ? may be i mess something or this is because it's community edition and you need to modify code, so who had experience with Erlang and Ejabberd can help me please ?

2

Both variants are in fact parallel. ejabberd_listener calls the start function in the listener module, which at least in the case of ejabberd_c2s ends up calling xmpp_stream_in:start, which starts a new gen_server process. The ejabberd_listener process is then free to call gen_tcp:accept again, waiting for another incoming connection.

The snippet from Joe Armstrong's book does it the other way around: it spawns a new process to accept further incoming connections, and handles the current connection in the existing process. It's not clear (to me, at least) that either way is necessarily more performant than the other.

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  • I thing that you have right, so after some analysis i thing that it is just like Joe's implementation, thank you legoscia but it still not efficient and in real servers, that will not work so if we consider that 100 connections came at the same time( i talk about just little server) the last one will wait the server to accept 99 connections to accept it, so the solution is to start a dynamic supervisor with 100 waiting children, and when a child accept a connection it will start a new waiting child to get always 100 free acceptors and this is how Cowboy work, so why Ejabberd does not ?
    – Michael
    Oct 11 at 19:10
  • Good question. My guess is that this is because XMPP connections are different from HTTP connections - they start with a STARTTLS handshake and authentication, so there is already so much overhead that a small delay in accepting the connection isn't noticeable - but only the ejabberd developers could give a definite answer.
    – legoscia
    Oct 12 at 8:38
  • Yes, i thing that authentication is a blocking mechanism and give some time but in moderate to big servers (Ejabberd is used in Whatsapp to handle 6 billions users) iam sure that will never work and free acceptors are the must and just in my opinion Process One team think about all kinds of server hardware which can be not very performant and can't handle fast parallel connections for 24/24h, so i begin to understand why you should master Erlang before using existing code to customize that last as your needs and your capacities.
    – Michael
    Oct 12 at 14:00
  • But the last word about that can be given just by Ejabberd developpers as you mention.
    – Michael
    Oct 12 at 14:01

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