3

Is there a technique to break an async loop, if it do not completes within an expected time period? I have a code like this:

(async()=>{
  for await(let t of asynDataStreamOrGenerator){
    //some data processing
  }
  //some other code I need to run based on whatever data collected by
  //asyncDataStreamOrGenerators within given time period
})()

If this loop is not completed within a timespan, break out of the loop and process the request further.

11
  • Seems like that should be the responsibility of asyncDataStreamOrGenerator to me... Oct 12 '21 at 13:10
  • what's wrong with simply check a flag at each iteration? (would not break current await, but is it really important?) Oct 12 '21 at 13:12
  • 2
    const startTime = Date.now(); for(....) { if (Date.now() - startTime > XXXXXX) break; Oct 12 '21 at 13:12
  • 1
    Wrap it in something you do control, that you can cancel. for await ... of is really for async generators, so you should have opportunity to not generate any more if the timeout lapses (using the technique proposed by @T.J.Crowder). Oct 12 '21 at 13:23
  • 1
    What is the asynchronous code? How is the call being made? The better answer depends on the exact details which I asked for after my first comment. Oct 12 '21 at 13:28
3

(See also the community wiki answer I posted with an alternative approach.)

In a comment you've said:

I am designing a consensus algorithm, where every source needs to send the response within a given time frame. If some of such participants are dead!, I mean they do not send values, the loop will be held for ever!

That sounds like a timeout to me. The usual way to implement a timeout is via Promise.race with a promise wrapped around a timer mechanism (setTimeout or similar). Promise.race watches the promises you pass into it and settles as soon as any of them settles (passing on that fulfillment or rejection), disregarding how any of the others settle later.

To do that, you'll need to loop another way instead of for-await-of and use the promise of the result object directly rather than indirectly. Let's say you have a utility function:

const delay = (ms, value) => new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(resolve, ms, value);
});

That returns a promise it fulfills X milliseconds later with whatever value you provide (if any).

Then:

(async () => {
    const TIMEOUT = 500; // Milliseconds
    const GOT_TIMEOUT = {};
    const it = asynDataStreamOrGenerator[Symbol.asyncIterator]();
    try {
        while (true) {
            const p = it.next();
            const result = await Promise.race([p, delay(TIMEOUT, GOT_TIMEOUT)]);
            if (result === GOT_TIMEOUT) {
                // Didn't get a response in time
                console.log("Timeout");
            } else {
                // Got a response
                if (result.done) {
                    // Iteration complete
                    console.log("Iteration complete");
                    break;
                }
                // ...some data processing on `result.value`...
                console.log(`Process ${result.value}`);
            }
        }
    } finally {
        try {
            it.return?.(); // Close the iterator if it needs closing
        } catch { }
    }
})();

Live Example using random durations for the async iterator's work, but forcing a timeout on the third iteration:

const delay = (ms, value) => new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(resolve, ms, value);
});

async function* example() {
    for (let i = 1; i <= 6; ++i) {
        const ms = i === 3 ? 600 : Math.floor(Math.random() * 100);
        await delay(ms);
        yield i;
    }
}

(async () => {
    const asynDataStreamOrGenerator = example();
    const TIMEOUT = 500; // Milliseconds
    const GOT_TIMEOUT = {};
    const it = asynDataStreamOrGenerator[Symbol.asyncIterator]();
    try {
        while (true) {
            const p = it.next();
            const start = Date.now();
            const result = await Promise.race([p, delay(TIMEOUT, GOT_TIMEOUT)]);
            const elapsed = Date.now() - start;
            if (result === GOT_TIMEOUT) {
                // Didn't get a response in time
                console.log(`Got timeout in ${elapsed}ms`);
            } else {
                // Got a response
                if (result.done) {
                    // Iteration complete
                    console.log(`Got iteration complete result in ${elapsed}ms`);
                    break;
                }
                // ...some data processing on `result.value`...
                console.log(`Got result ${result.value} to process in ${elapsed}ms`);
            }
        }
    } finally {
        try {
            it.return?.(); // Close the iterator if it needs closing
        } catch { }
    }
})();
.as-console-wrapper {
    max-height: 100% !important;
}

Here's that example with the timeout on the first iteration, since you seemed concerned about that case:

const delay = (ms, value) => new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(resolve, ms, value);
});

async function* example() {
    for (let i = 1; i <= 6; ++i) {
        const ms = i === 1 ? 600 : Math.floor(Math.random() * 100);
        await delay(ms);
        yield i;
    }
}

(async () => {
    const asynDataStreamOrGenerator = example();
    const TIMEOUT = 500; // Milliseconds
    const GOT_TIMEOUT = {};
    const it = asynDataStreamOrGenerator[Symbol.asyncIterator]();
    try {
        while (true) {
            const p = it.next();
            const start = Date.now();
            const result = await Promise.race([p, delay(TIMEOUT, GOT_TIMEOUT)]);
            const elapsed = Date.now() - start;
            if (result === GOT_TIMEOUT) {
                // Didn't get a response in time
                console.log(`Got timeout in ${elapsed}ms`);
            } else {
                // Got a response
                if (result.done) {
                    // Iteration complete
                    console.log(`Got iteration complete result in ${elapsed}ms`);
                    break;
                }
                // ...some data processing on `result.value`...
                console.log(`Got result ${result.value} to process in ${elapsed}ms`);
            }
        }
    } finally {
        try {
            it.return?.(); // Close the iterator if it needs closing
        } catch { }
    }
})();
.as-console-wrapper {
    max-height: 100% !important;
}

If you don't want the processing to hold up collection of the next value, you could not await the processing that you do (perhaps build up an array of the promises for completion of that processing and Promise.all them at the end).

Or if you want to bail out of the entire operation:

(async () => {
    const TIMEOUT = 500; // Milliseconds
    const GOT_TIMEOUT = {};
    const results = [];
    const it = asynDataStreamOrGenerator[Symbol.asyncIterator]();
    try {
        while (true) {
            const p = it.next();
            const result = await Promise.race([p, delay(TIMEOUT, GOT_TIMEOUT)]);
            if (result === GOT_TIMEOUT) {
                // Didn't get a response in time, bail
                console.log("Timeout");
                break;
            }
            // Got a response
            if (result.done) {
                // Iteration complete
                console.log("Iteration complete");
                break;
            }
            console.log(`Got ${result.value}`);
            results.push(result.value);
        }
    } finally {
        try {
            it.return?.();
        } catch { }
    }
    // ...code here to process the contents of `results`...
    for (const value of results) {
        console.log(`Process ${value}`);
    }
})();

Live Example:

const delay = (ms, value) => new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(resolve, ms, value);
});

async function* example() {
    for (let i = 1; i <= 6; ++i) {
        const ms = i === 3 ? 600 : Math.floor(Math.random() * 100);
        await delay(ms);
        yield i;
    }
}

(async () => {
    const asynDataStreamOrGenerator = example(); // For the example
    const TIMEOUT = 500; // Milliseconds
    const GOT_TIMEOUT = {};
    const results = [];
    const it = asynDataStreamOrGenerator[Symbol.asyncIterator]();
    try {
        while (true) {
            const p = it.next();
            const start = Date.now();
            const result = await Promise.race([p, delay(TIMEOUT, GOT_TIMEOUT)]);
            const elapsed = Date.now() - start;
            if (result === GOT_TIMEOUT) {
                // Didn't get a response in time, bail
                console.log(`Got timeout after ${elapsed}ms`);
                break;
            }
            // Got a response
            if (result.done) {
                // Iteration complete
                console.log(`Got iteration complete after ${elapsed}ms`);
                break;
            }
            console.log(`Got value ${result.value} after ${elapsed}ms`);
            results.push(result.value);
        }
    } finally {
        try {
            it.return?.();
        } catch { }
    }
    // ...code here to process the contents of `results`...
    for (const value of results) {
        console.log(`Process ${value}`);
    }
})();
.as-console-wrapper {
    max-height: 100% !important;
}

And again where it times out on the first pass but not every pass (since this bails on the first timeout, we don't see subsequent ones):

const delay = (ms, value) => new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(resolve, ms, value);
});

async function* example() {
    for (let i = 1; i <= 6; ++i) {
        const ms = i === 1 ? 600 : Math.floor(Math.random() * 100);
        await delay(ms);
        yield i;
    }
}

(async () => {
    const asynDataStreamOrGenerator = example(); // For the example
    const TIMEOUT = 500; // Milliseconds
    const GOT_TIMEOUT = {};
    const results = [];
    const it = asynDataStreamOrGenerator[Symbol.asyncIterator]();
    try {
        while (true) {
            const p = it.next();
            const start = Date.now();
            const result = await Promise.race([p, delay(TIMEOUT, GOT_TIMEOUT)]);
            const elapsed = Date.now() - start;
            if (result === GOT_TIMEOUT) {
                // Didn't get a response in time, bail
                console.log(`Got timeout after ${elapsed}ms`);
                break;
            }
            // Got a response
            if (result.done) {
                // Iteration complete
                console.log(`Got iteration complete after ${elapsed}ms`);
                break;
            }
            console.log(`Got value ${result.value} after ${elapsed}ms`);
            results.push(result.value);
        }
    } finally {
        try {
            it.return?.();
        } catch { }
    }
    // ...code here to process the contents of `results`...
    for (const value of results) {
        console.log(`Process ${value}`);
    }
})();
.as-console-wrapper {
    max-height: 100% !important;
}

Or some combination of the two. You'll need to tweak this based on what you're really doing, but that's a direction that seems reasonable.


In all of the above:

  • Replace it.return?.(); with if (it.return) { it.return(); } if your environment doesn't support optional chaining yet.
  • Replace catch { } with catch (e) { } if your environment doesn't support optional catch bindings yet.
10
  • 1
    I believe OP want to timeout on the whole operations (instead of individual) Oct 12 '21 at 13:25
  • @appleapple - I couldn't tell for sure, but "delay" doesn't sound like "cancel" or bail-out to me. It's a small tweak if so though. I've added that tweak. Oct 12 '21 at 13:27
  • @appleapple. Exactly. The code shared above assume that we will definitely receive value on time. The async generator can send value at any interval. I wanted to break the loop if a given time has passed, even if I have not recived a single value meanwhile. The timeout code n above solution will only trigger if we recive values, then it will calculate if time has passed. But the problem is "async loop should not take more than X time, even if we have not recived a single value". Oct 12 '21 at 13:28
  • 1
    @AnuragVohra - "The code shared above assume that we will definitely receive value on time." No, it doesn't. That's the whole point of the Promise.race thing. (Notice no await on for-of; we get the promise from the async iterator, we don't wait for it to settle before calling Promise.race.) I've updated the answer to show the tweak if you want to break (not "delay") the loop. Oct 12 '21 at 13:29
  • @T.J.Crowder will this for (const p of asynDataStreamOrGenerator) code iterate even once if we have not received even a single value yet?, I am no expert, just asking. My assumption is that it will create a promise only once it receives some data. Oct 12 '21 at 13:34
3

You can use a timeout Promise (timer in the code) and use Promise.race on each iteration.


The code below would print up to around 30 while the generator can generate more.

async function wait(ms) {
  return new Promise(r=>setTimeout(r, ms))
}

async function* asynDataStreamOrGenerator() {
  for (let i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
    await wait(30)
    yield i;
  }
}

async function* iterate_until(generator, timeout) {
  let timer = wait(timeout).then(_=>Promise.reject("TimeOut"))
  for (;;) {
    let it = generator.next()
    let result = await Promise.race([timer, it])
    if (result.done) break;
    yield result.value;
  }
}

{(async () => {
  try {
    for await (let t of iterate_until(asynDataStreamOrGenerator(), 1000)) {
      console.log(t)
    }
  } catch (e) { /* catch timeout, rethrow if needed*/ }
})()}

JSFiddle Link

4
  • @T.J.Crowder true, never think I cannot loop through async generator and get the promises... Oct 12 '21 at 14:08
  • @T.J.Crowder updated with async generator. thanks for point out :) Oct 12 '21 at 14:44
  • the jsfiddle link is because recently the SO snippet acting weird for me Oct 12 '21 at 14:55
  • Nice one! It's very similar to the community wiki answer I posted inspired by Heretic Monkey's comment. Oct 12 '21 at 15:06
1

In the comments on the question, Heretic Monkey suggested wrapping the async iterable in another one that implements a timeout. That's a very good idea, because then the code using that wrapper can use for-await-of.

If you want to keep going after a timeout, it looks something like this:

async function* timeoutWrapper(asyncIterable, timeoutDuration, timeoutValue) {
    const it = asyncIterable[Symbol.asyncIterator]();
    try {
        while (true) {
            const result = await Promise.race([
                it.next(),
                delay(timeoutDuration, timeoutValue)
            ]);
            if (result === timeoutValue) {
                yield timeoutValue;
            } else if (result.done) {
                break;
            } else {
                yield result.value;
            }
        }
    } finally {
        it.return?.();
    }
}

Using it:

for await (const t of timeoutWrapper(asynDataStreamOrGenerator, TIMEOUT, GOT_TIMEOUT)) {
    if (t === GOT_TIMEOUT) {
        // Didn't get a response in time
        console.log("Timeout");
    } else {
        // Got a response
        // ...some data processing on `result.value`...
        console.log(`Process ${t}`);
    }
}
console.log("Done");

Live Example:

const delay = (ms, value) => new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(resolve, ms, value);
});

async function* example() {
    for (let i = 1; i <= 6; ++i) {
        await delay(200 + i * 100);
        yield i;
    }
}

async function* timeoutWrapper(asyncIterable, timeoutDuration, timeoutValue) {
    const it = asyncIterable[Symbol.asyncIterator]();
    try {
        while (true) {
            const result = await Promise.race([
                it.next(),
                delay(timeoutDuration, timeoutValue)
            ]);
            if (result === timeoutValue) {
                yield timeoutValue;
            } else if (result.done) {
                break;
            } else {
                yield result.value;
            }
        }
    } finally {
        it.return?.();
    }
}

(async () => {
    const asynDataStreamOrGenerator = example();
    const TIMEOUT = 500; // Milliseconds
    const GOT_TIMEOUT = {};
    for await (const t of timeoutWrapper(asynDataStreamOrGenerator, TIMEOUT, GOT_TIMEOUT)) {
        if (t === GOT_TIMEOUT) {
            // Didn't get a response in time
            console.log("Timeout");
        } else {
            // Got a response
            // ...some data processing on `result.value`...
            console.log(`Process ${t}`);
        }
    }
    console.log("Done");
})();

If you don't want to keep going after a timeout, you could have it throw an error (terminating the iteration) instead:

async function* timeoutWrapper(asyncIterable, timeoutDuration) {
    const TIMEOUT_VALUE = {};
    const it = asyncIterable[Symbol.asyncIterator]();
    try {
        while (true) {
            const result = await Promise.race([
                it.next(),
                delay(timeoutDuration, TIMEOUT_VALUE)
            ]);
            if (result === TIMEOUT_VALUE) {
                throw new Error(`Timeout after ${timeoutDuration}ms`);
            } else if (result.done) {
                break;
            } else {
                yield result.value;
            }
        }
    } finally {
        it.return?.();
    }
}

Using it:

try {
    for await (const t of timeoutWrapper(asynDataStreamOrGenerator, TIMEOUT)) {
        // Got a response
        console.log(`Process ${t}`);
    }
    console.log("Done");
} catch (e) {
    console.error(e.message);
}

Live Example:

const delay = (ms, value) => new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(resolve, ms, value);
});

async function* example() {
    for (let i = 1; i <= 6; ++i) {
        await delay(200 + i * 100);
        yield i;
    }
}

async function* timeoutWrapper(asyncIterable, timeoutDuration) {
    const TIMEOUT_VALUE = {};
    const it = asyncIterable[Symbol.asyncIterator]();
    try {
        while (true) {
            const result = await Promise.race([
                it.next(),
                delay(timeoutDuration, TIMEOUT_VALUE)
            ]);
            if (result === TIMEOUT_VALUE) {
                throw new Error(`Timeout after ${timeoutDuration}ms`);
            } else if (result.done) {
                break;
            } else {
                yield result.value;
            }
        }
    } finally {
        it.return?.();
    }
}

(async () => {
    const asynDataStreamOrGenerator = example();
    const TIMEOUT = 500; // Milliseconds
    try {
        for await (const t of timeoutWrapper(asynDataStreamOrGenerator, TIMEOUT)) {
            // Got a response
            console.log(`Process ${t}`);
        }
        console.log("Done");
    } catch (e) {
        console.error(e.message);
    }
})();

2
  • A let start = Date.now(); before const asynDataStreamOrGenerator = example(); and console.log("Duration: ",Date.now()-start); after catch block will shows that this async interaor works for more than 500ms (~1700ms on my system) Oct 13 '21 at 3:56
  • @AnuragVohra - There are intentional delays above to show what's happening. There is no significant extra overhead in this. "async interaor works for more than 500ms (~1700ms on my system)" Are you looking at total time? Read the code closely. The timeout being applied above is per iteration (because that's what you seemed to want). If you want something else, just modify the code slightly to do that other thing instead. All the techniques and information you need is already there. Oct 13 '21 at 7:13

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