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I am trying to use list comprehension to define a Haskell function designated as ted that takes a list of items of type class Ord. The function ted shall remove all occurrences of the largest item in the list. In case the given list is empty, ted shall just return the empty list.

This is my code

import Data. List
import Data.Function

rmax :: Ord a => [a] -> [a]
Prelude> [a | a<- as]
[a | a <- as, a % 2 == 0
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5
  • What have you tried so far?
    – user1984
    Oct 13 at 22:53
  • [a | a <- as] [a | a <- as, a % 2 == 0]
    – Josh Chang
    Oct 13 at 23:31
  • 1
    Should work great as long as the largest number is even and no other numbers are.
    – amalloy
    Oct 14 at 0:00
  • How do I do this if the largest number is not even, or its string or an empty set?
    – Josh Chang
    Oct 14 at 0:10
  • I would find the largest element in one pass and then pull all elements that are smaller in a second pass (this would be your list comprehension).
    – user1984
    Oct 14 at 0:12
2
module Main where

list :: [Int]
list = [5,8,6,3,8]
--list = []
--list = [8]

ted :: Ord a => [a] -> [a]
ted as = [a | a<-as, a /= (maximum as)]

main :: IO ()
main =  putStrLn $ show $ ted list

Output:

[5,6,3]
1
  • [a | let x = maximum as, a<-as, a /= x] is better. :)
    – Will Ness
    Oct 15 at 14:39
-1

You can do this with a single pass over the list:

import Data.List.NonEmpty (NonEmpty (..))

removeMax :: Ord a => NonEmpty a -> [a]
removeMax xs@(hd :| _) =
  let (res, greatest) =
    foldr
      (\x (tl, m) -> (if x == greatest then tl else x : tl, max x m))
      ([], hd)
      xs
   in res

This is called "tying the knot".

1
  • 1
    This might be a solution. But this is not list comprehension. You may improve your answer to answer the question correctly. 5 hours ago

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