63

I was figuring out how to do floor/ceiling operations without the math module. I solved this by using floor division //, and found out that the negative "gives the ceiling". So this works:

>>> 3//2
1
>>> -3//2
-2

I would like the answer to be positive, so first I tried --3//2, but this gives 1. I inferred this is because Python evaluates -- to +. So to solve this, I found out I could use -(-3//2)), problem solved.

But I came over another solution to this, namely (I included the previous example for comparison):

>>> --3//2  # Does not give ceiling
1
>>> 0--3//2  # Does give ceiling
2

I am unable to explain why including the 0 helps. I have read the documentation on division, but I did not find any help there. I thought it might be because of the evaluation order:

If I use --3//2 as an example, from the documentation I have that Positive, negative, bitwise NOT is strictest in this example, and I guess this evaluates -- to +. Next comes Multiplication, division, remainder, so I guess this is +3//2 which evaluates to 1, and we are finished. I am unable to infer it from the documentation why including 0 should change the result.

References:

12
  • 6
    -3//2 giving -2 is still giving you the floor; floor(x) is the largest integer lower than x, and -2 is the largest integer lower than -1.5.
    – Hearth
    Oct 15 at 18:44
  • 1
    @Hearth You are right, but the "spirit" of the question was seeking the ceiling of 1.5, not -1.5. But I understand that it is imprecise. Oct 16 at 8:27
  • 2
    @chepner I believe they mean they want to use this operation as a roundabout way of doing the ceiling for positive numbers. So they don't expect -3//2 to be positive, they want to get the result consistently converted to positive in a way where they can use it effectively as math.ceil(3/2).
    – Tyberius
    Oct 16 at 18:56
  • 2
    @chepner The point of -3//2 was just the first step for them to get the "ceil" of 3/2. The second step was converting it back to positive/absolute value, which triggered this question because it did not go quite as expected. Oct 16 at 18:57
  • 2
    @ttbek: The advantage it has over adding one to the floor is that it gives the right answer! (For example, if a=4, b=2 then (a // b) +1 gives 3 but ceil(4/2) is 2.
    – psmears
    Oct 18 at 10:46
86

Python uses the symbol - as both a unary (-x) and a binary (x-y) operator. These have different operator precedence.

In specific, the ordering wrt // is:

  • unary -
  • binary //
  • binary -

By introducing a 0 as 0--3//2, the first - is a binary - and is applied last. Without a leading 0 as --3//2, both - are unary and applied together.

The corresponding evaluation/syntax tree is roughly like this, evaluating nodes at the bottom first to use them in the parent node:

 ---------------- ---------------- 
|     --3//2     |    0--3//2     |
|================|================|
|                |    -------     |
|                |   | 0 - z |    |
|                |    -----+-     |
|                |         |      |
|     --------   |     ----+---   |
|    | x // y |  |    | x // y |  |
|     -+----+-   |     -+----+-   |
|      |    |    |      |    |    |
|  ----+    +--  |   ---+    +--  |
| | --3 |  | 2 | |  | -3 |  | 2 | |
|  -----    ---  |   ----    ---  |
 ---------------- ---------------- 

Because the unary - are applied together, they cancel out. In contrast, the unary and binary - are applied before and after the division, respectively.

7
  • 8
    Ah, I am quite the novice, so it's the difference between unary and binary that got lost on me. After your answer I tried this: 0+--3//2 == 1, so it makes sense that the first operator to the right of 0 is treated as a binary operator. Oct 15 at 10:24
  • 21
    @KarlWilhelm This is where adding spaces and parentheses to your code will make it much more clear what's going on. Unless you're writing for CodeGolf.SE, and trying to save bytes, it's better to more cleanly format stuff like this... Oct 15 at 20:01
  • 5
    @KarlWilhelm A unary operation is a function that takes one argument. A binary operation is a function that takes two. I find it helpful to draw the parentheses when explaining what is happening. 0--3//2 is 0 - (-3 // 2), while --3//2 is (--3) // 2
    – Cort Ammon
    Oct 15 at 22:36
  • 2
    Now I wonder whether in Python the “-“ in “-3” is the unary operator or part of an integer literal.
    – Carsten S
    Oct 16 at 16:41
  • 7
    @CarstenS It's not part of the literal syntactically – the AST represents it basically as UnaryOp("-", 3) (just a lot less pretty). An integer literal is just the absolute part. However, it is evaluated when generating the bytecode and directly loaded as the value -3 at runtime. Oct 16 at 19:02
30

This is a simple matter of order of operations.

--3//2 is the same as (-(-3)) // 2. Since there is nothing on the left-hand side, each - must be unary negation; and this has higher precedence than //; so 3 is negated twice (yielding 3) and then divided by 2.

0--3//2 is the same as 0 - ((-3) // 2). Now that there is something on the left-hand side, the first - must be binary subtraction, which has lower precedence than //. The second - is still unary negation; -3 is divided by 2 yielding -2, and then that value is subtracted from 0.

1
  • 1
    Fixed the typo. A lot of small numbers in there after all. Oct 17 at 8:47
18

Another way to know how CPython actually calculates is to use the dis module to see what it actually does with its stack machine.

>>> import dis
>>> dis.dis('0--3//2')
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               0 (2)
              2 RETURN_VALUE

Whoops, constants are calculated during compilation, so use a name.

>>> t=3
>>> dis.dis('0--t//2')
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               0 (0)
              2 LOAD_NAME                0 (t)
              4 UNARY_NEGATIVE
              6 LOAD_CONST               1 (2)
              8 BINARY_FLOOR_DIVIDE
             10 BINARY_SUBTRACT
             12 RETURN_VALUE

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