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I recently observed significant differences in results between covariance computation in Pandas and the MLLib equivalent. Results are reasonably close for fully specified inputs (i.e. without any NAs) but deviate significantly for missing values. Pandas source explains how NAs are treated but I could not reproduce results using Spark. I could not find documentation on what exactly RowMatrix().computeCovariance() does with regards to NAs in the source - but my Scala is very fair at best and I am unfamiliar with BLAS, perhaps I missed something. There is the BLAS warning for which I could not track down the reason since I am using a pre-build macOS Spark setup:

WARN BLAS: Failed to load implementation from: com.github.fommil.netlib.NativeSystemBLAS

Given the importance of covariance for many applications, I wonder if someone could shed some light on the exact treatment of missing values for covariance calculation in Apache Spark MLLib?

EDIT: Additionally, this is not resolved in the current Spark 3.2 release, since The method `pd.DataFrame.cov()` is not implemented yet.

Assuming the following setup:

from pyspark.sql import SparkSession
from pyspark.mllib.linalg.distributed import RowMatrix

spark = SparkSession.builder.appName("MyApp") \
    .config("spark.sql.execution.arrow.pyspark.enabled", "true") \
    .getOrCreate()
sc = spark.sparkContext
good_rows = sc.parallelize([[11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18], 
                            [21, 22, 23, 42, 26, 27, 28],
                            [31, 32, 33, 34, 36, 37, 38],
                            [41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 48],
                            [51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58],
                            [ 1,  2,  3,  4,  6,  7,  8]])
bad_rows = sc.parallelize([[11, 12, None, 14, 16, None, 18], 
                           [21, 22, None, 42, 26, None, 28],
                           [31, 32, None, 34, 36, None, 38],
                           [41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 48],
                           [51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58],
                           [ 1,  2,  3,  4,  6,  7,  8]])

The covariance computed from good_rows are equal for Pandas and Spark:

good_rows.toDF().toPandas().cov()
# Results in:
       _1     _2     _3     _4     _5     _6     _7
_1  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0
_2  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0
_3  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0
_4  332.0  332.0  332.0  368.0  332.0  332.0  332.0
_5  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0
_6  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0
_7  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0

spark.createDataFrame(RowMatrix(good_rows).computeCovariance().toArray().tolist()).toPandas()
# Results in:
      _1     _2     _3     _4     _5     _6     _7
0  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0
1  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0
2  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0
3  332.0  332.0  332.0  368.0  332.0  332.0  332.0
4  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0
5  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0
6  350.0  350.0  350.0  332.0  350.0  350.0  350.0

Running the same with the bad_rowsresults in very different covariance matrices, unless Pandas is cov() runs with min_periods=(bad_rows.count()/2)+1

bad_rows.toDF().toPandas().cov()
#Results in: 
       _1     _2     _3     _4     _5     _6     _7
_1  350.0  350.0  700.0  332.0  350.0  700.0  350.0
_2  350.0  350.0  700.0  332.0  350.0  700.0  350.0
_3  700.0  700.0  700.0  700.0  700.0  700.0  700.0
_4  332.0  332.0  700.0  368.0  332.0  700.0  332.0
_5  350.0  350.0  700.0  332.0  350.0  700.0  350.0
_6  700.0  700.0  700.0  700.0  700.0  700.0  700.0
_7  350.0  350.0  700.0  332.0  350.0  700.0  350.0
spark.createDataFrame(RowMatrix(bad_rows).computeCovariance().toArray().tolist()).toPandas()
# Results in:
      _1     _2  _3     _4     _5  _6     _7
0  350.0  350.0 NaN  332.0  350.0 NaN  350.0
1  350.0  350.0 NaN  332.0  350.0 NaN  350.0
2    NaN    NaN NaN    NaN    NaN NaN    NaN
3  332.0  332.0 NaN  368.0  332.0 NaN  332.0
4  350.0  350.0 NaN  332.0  350.0 NaN  350.0
5    NaN    NaN NaN    NaN    NaN NaN    NaN
6  350.0  350.0 NaN  332.0  350.0 NaN  350.0

bad_rows.toDF().toPandas().cov(min_periods=(bad_rows.count()/2)+1)
# With 50% of dataframe rows +1 Pandas equals the Spark result:
       _1     _2  _3     _4     _5  _6     _7
_1  350.0  350.0 NaN  332.0  350.0 NaN  350.0
_2  350.0  350.0 NaN  332.0  350.0 NaN  350.0
_3    NaN    NaN NaN    NaN    NaN NaN    NaN
_4  332.0  332.0 NaN  368.0  332.0 NaN  332.0
_5  350.0  350.0 NaN  332.0  350.0 NaN  350.0
_6    NaN    NaN NaN    NaN    NaN NaN    NaN
_7  350.0  350.0 NaN  332.0  350.0 NaN  350.0

I did try to set Noneto 0and to meanbut could not reproduce the MLLib covariance results with these standard imputations, see below.

# Zero NA fill:
zeroed_na_rows = sc.parallelize([[11, 12, 0, 14, 16, 0, 18], 
                       [21, 22, 0, 42, 26, 0, 28],
                       [31, 32, 0, 34, 36, 0, 38],
                       [41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 48],
                       [51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58],
                       [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8]])
spark.createDataFrame(RowMatrix(zeroed_na_rows).computeCovariance().toArray().tolist()).toPandas()
# Results in:
      _1     _2     _3     _4     _5     _6     _7
0  350.0  350.0  379.0  332.0  350.0  391.0  350.0
1  350.0  350.0  379.0  332.0  350.0  391.0  350.0
2  379.0  379.0  606.7  319.6  379.0  646.3  379.0
3  332.0  332.0  319.6  368.0  332.0  324.4  332.0
4  350.0  350.0  379.0  332.0  350.0  391.0  350.0
5  391.0  391.0  646.3  324.4  391.0  690.7  391.0
6  350.0  350.0  379.0  332.0  350.0  391.0  350.0

# Mean NA fill:
mean_rows = sc.parallelize([[11, 12, 27, 14, 16, 37, 18], 
                           [21, 22, 27, 42, 26, 37, 28],
                           [31, 32, 27, 34, 36, 37, 38],
                           [41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 48],
                           [51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58],
                           [ 1,  2,  3,  4,  6,  7,  8]])
spark.createDataFrame(RowMatrix(mean_rows).computeCovariance().toArray().tolist()).toPandas()
#Results in (still different from Pandas.cov()):
      _1     _2     _3     _4     _5     _6     _7
0  350.0  350.0  298.0  332.0  350.0  280.0  350.0
1  350.0  350.0  298.0  332.0  350.0  280.0  350.0
2  298.0  298.0  290.8  287.2  298.0  280.0  298.0
3  332.0  332.0  287.2  368.0  332.0  280.0  332.0
4  350.0  350.0  298.0  332.0  350.0  280.0  350.0
5  280.0  280.0  280.0  280.0  280.0  280.0  280.0
6  350.0  350.0  298.0  332.0  350.0  280.0  350.0

If it's not that, what's going on here and how do I get Spark MLLib to produce reasonably similar results to Pandas?

1 Answer 1

-1

I don't think there is an easy way to reproduce Pandas treatments of NANs in Spark without re-implementing your own cov method.

The reason is that Pandas just ignore every NAN - it does not replace it with any value - that's why you replacing the NANs with 0 or the mean does not lead to the same results. Pandas instead seems to throw away the pair of observations with missing values and computes the covariance on the remaining pairs.

The Spark implementation on the other hand, returns NAN when it is asked to compute the covariance of a set of pairs that contain a NAN. I don't know at what point exactly this happens in the code/calculation, but as far as I can see you can't change it easily by just changing a default parameter and you might have to create your own version of the cov function or find a way to pre- and post-process columns with NANs, e.g. remove their NANs and calculate the Covariance and stick replace the NANs in your resulting covariance matrix with those values.

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  • Thanks. Can you please elaborate on what makes you believe that this is only due to dropped NA? Dropping NAs just results in yet another COV matrix.
    – RndmSymbl
    Oct 29, 2021 at 14:50
  • To get to the result that Pandas gives you, try to calculate the covariance matrix by hand and for each pair of columns, drop the pair of values that contains at least one NaN.
    – Schnipp
    Oct 29, 2021 at 22:23
  • Not sure what you mean by "yet another COV matrix"? Other values? Other shape? The cov matrix is calculated by calculating the cov of each pair of two columns in the input matrix. The resulting cov matrix will be of dimension n x n, where n is the number of column of the input matrix. When there is a NaN in any of the columns, it will be disregarded along with its partner in the other column. But unless there are too few values, the covariance of these two columns will still be calculated and will fill the cov matrix - the resulting cov matrix will have the same shape as one w/o NaNs.
    – Schnipp
    Oct 29, 2021 at 22:24
  • If you drop the NA SparkML still doesn't compute a comparable result to Pandas. Perhaps you can show some code that would make them conform?
    – RndmSymbl
    Oct 30, 2021 at 11:53
  • How did you drop the NAs in Spark? Did you drop the entire row or column containing NAs? Sorry, can't show any code to make them conform, but if you want to understand how Pandas "ignores" the NAs, check out the code in for [nancorr][1]. It creates a mask on the input matrix that replaces every Nan with 0 and then iterates over the matrix to calculate the cov, ignoring values that have 0. You might try to implement this approach in Spark? [1]: github.com/pandas-dev/pandas/blob/…
    – Schnipp
    Nov 1, 2021 at 23:19

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