-6

from such:

[
  {"Caerus1", "Ramses Refiner"},
  {"Caerus1", "Jupiter Refiner"},
  {"Caerus1", "Jupiter Other"},
  {"Caerus1", "Trader 13"},
  {"Caerus1", "Cathode Supplier 4"},
  {"Dionysus3", "Cathode Supplier 4"},
  {"Dionysus3", "Ramses Refiner"},
  {"Dionysus3", "Trader 13"},
  {"Dionysus3", "Jupiter Refiner"},
  {"Dionysus3", "Jupiter Other"},
  {"Prometheus2", "Jupiter Other"},
  {"Prometheus2", "Ramses Refiner"},
  {"Prometheus2", "Trader 13"},
  {"Prometheus2", "Cathode Supplier 4"},
  {"Prometheus2", "Jupiter Refiner"}
]

I'd like to achieve this:

[
  {"Caerus1" => ["Ramses Refiner", "Jupiter Refiner", "Jupiter Other", "Trader 13", "Cathode Supplier 4"]},
   .
   .
   .
]

So basically converting these tuples into a map with unique key - so it doesn't repeat (that I can do easily) the hard part is making a list of the 2nd element strings.

Thanks in advance

3
1> L_tup = [
1>   {"Caerus1", "Ramses Refiner"},
1>   {"Caerus1", "Jupiter Refiner"},
1>   {"Caerus1", "Jupiter Other"},
1>   {"Caerus1", "Trader 13"},
1>   {"Caerus1", "Cathode Supplier 4"},
1>   {"Dionysus3", "Cathode Supplier 4"},
1>   {"Dionysus3", "Ramses Refiner"},
1>   {"Dionysus3", "Trader 13"},
1>   {"Dionysus3", "Jupiter Refiner"},
1>   {"Dionysus3", "Jupiter Other"},
1>   {"Prometheus2", "Jupiter Other"},
1>   {"Prometheus2", "Ramses Refiner"},
1>   {"Prometheus2", "Trader 13"},
1>   {"Prometheus2", "Cathode Supplier 4"},
1>   {"Prometheus2", "Jupiter Refiner"}
1> ].
[{"Caerus1","Ramses Refiner"},
 {"Caerus1","Jupiter Refiner"},
 {"Caerus1","Jupiter Other"},
 {"Caerus1","Trader 13"},
 {"Caerus1","Cathode Supplier 4"},
 {"Dionysus3","Cathode Supplier 4"},
 {"Dionysus3","Ramses Refiner"},
 {"Dionysus3","Trader 13"},
 {"Dionysus3","Jupiter Refiner"},
 {"Dionysus3","Jupiter Other"},
 {"Prometheus2","Jupiter Other"},
 {"Prometheus2","Ramses Refiner"},
 {"Prometheus2","Trader 13"},
 {"Prometheus2","Cathode Supplier 4"},
 {"Prometheus2","Jupiter Refiner"}]
2> F = fun({K,V},Acc) ->                  
2>     case Acc of                        
2>         [#{K:=L}|T] -> [#{K=>[V|L]}|T];
2>         Acc -> [#{K => [V]}|Acc]       
2>     end                                
2> end.                                   
#Fun<erl_eval.43.79398840>
3> lists:foldl(F,[],L_tup).
[#{"Prometheus2" =>
       ["Jupiter Refiner","Cathode Supplier 4","Trader 13",
        "Ramses Refiner","Jupiter Other"]},
 #{"Dionysus3" =>
       ["Jupiter Other","Jupiter Refiner","Trader 13",
        "Ramses Refiner","Cathode Supplier 4"]},
 #{"Caerus1" =>
       ["Cathode Supplier 4","Trader 13","Jupiter Other",
        "Jupiter Refiner","Ramses Refiner"]}]
4>

if the initial list L_tup is not sorted it is necessary to use lists:sort(L_tup).

The former code will have a result looking like the example you give: a list of map. But it is not a map as described in the last sentence. To create a map you can use the next code (this version does not need a sorted input):

4> F1 = fun({K,V},M) ->       
4>     L = maps:get(K,M,[]), 
4>     M#{K=>[V|L]}          
4> end.
#Fun<erl_eval.43.79398840>
5> lists:foldl(F1,#{},L_tup).
#{"Caerus1" =>
      ["Cathode Supplier 4","Trader 13","Jupiter Other",
       "Jupiter Refiner","Ramses Refiner"],
  "Dionysus3" =>
      ["Jupiter Other","Jupiter Refiner","Trader 13",
       "Ramses Refiner","Cathode Supplier 4"],
  "Prometheus2" =>
      ["Jupiter Refiner","Cathode Supplier 4","Trader 13",
       "Ramses Refiner","Jupiter Other"]}
6> % could be written in a single line :o)
6> % lists:foldl(fun({K,V},M) -> M#{K=>[V|maps:get(K,M,[])]} end,#{},L_tup).
6
  • Not an erlang user, what := does exactly?
    – akad
    Oct 15 at 21:17
  • This is not working
    – akad
    Oct 15 at 22:22
  • It works. This text is a copy/paste from werl console, but it need the version 23 or higher of erlang. If you have an older version the first case statement: [#{K:=L}|T] -> [#{K=>[V|L]}|T]; is not allowed. The second example, which return a map as you require in your text, should work with earlier versions.
    – Pascal
    Oct 16 at 5:11
  • To have a complete explanation of what := does, I suggest you go to the documentation map-expressions. In short it does roughly the same thing than => in a map, but requires that the key already exists. It is why you must use this notation in pattern matching.
    – Pascal
    Oct 16 at 5:16
  • 2
    @akad you put a tag erlang and then you ask what := does in the erlang solution and even claim the perfectly working code not working? This is ridiculous. | Upvoted, ofc. Oct 16 at 8:18
1

In Elixir it's quite easy with Enum.group_by/3:

iex> Enum.group_by(values, fn {key, _} -> key end, fn {_, value} -> value end)
%{
  "Caerus1" => ["Ramses Refiner", "Jupiter Refiner", "Jupiter Other",
   "Trader 13", "Cathode Supplier 4"],
  "Dionysus3" => ["Cathode Supplier 4", "Ramses Refiner", "Trader 13",
   "Jupiter Refiner", "Jupiter Other"],
  "Prometheus2" => ["Jupiter Other", "Ramses Refiner", "Trader 13",
   "Cathode Supplier 4", "Jupiter Refiner"]
}
2
  • 1
    Also: input |> Enum.group_by(&elem(&1, 0), &elem(&1, 1)). Oct 16 at 8:20
  • 1
    Also: for {k, v} <- input, reduce: %{}, do: (acc -> Map.update(acc, k, [v], &[v | &1])) Oct 16 at 8:22

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