32
var addObjectResponse = [{
    'DateTimeTaken': '/Date(1301494335000-0400)/',
    'Weight': 100909.090909091,
    'Height': 182.88,
    'SPO2': '222.00000',
    'BloodPressureSystolic': 120,
    'BloodPressureDiastolic': 80,
    'BloodPressurePosition': 'Standing',
    'VitalSite': 'Popliteal',
    'Laterality': 'Right',
    'CuffSize': 'XL',
    'HeartRate': 111,
    'HeartRateRegularity': 'Regular',
    'Resprate': 111,    
    'Temperature': 36.6666666666667,
    'TemperatureMethod': 'Oral',    
    'HeadCircumference': '',    
}];

This is a sample object which i am getting from back end, now i want to change the order of the object. I don't want to sort by name or size... i just want to manually change the order...

3

14 Answers 14

45

If you create a new object from the first object (as the current accepted answer suggests) you will always need to know all of the properties in your object (a maintenance nightmare).

Use Object.assign() instead.

*This works in modern browsers -- not in IE or Edge <12.

const addObjectResponse = {
  'DateTimeTaken': '/Date(1301494335000-0400)/',
  'Weight': 100909.090909091,
  'Height': 182.88,
  'SPO2': '222.00000',
  'BloodPressureSystolic': 120,
  'BloodPressureDiastolic': 80,
  'BloodPressurePosition': 'Standing',
  'VitalSite': 'Popliteal',
  'Laterality': 'Right',
  'CuffSize': 'XL',
  'HeartRate': 111,                              // <-----
  'HeartRateRegularity': 'Regular',              // <-----
  'Resprate': 111,    
  'Temperature': 36.6666666666667,
  'TemperatureMethod': 'Oral',    
  'HeadCircumference': '',    
};

// Create an object which will serve as the order template
const objectOrder = {
  'HeartRate': null,
  'HeartRateRegularity': null,
}
  
const addObjectResource = Object.assign(objectOrder, addObjectResponse);

The two items you wanted to be ordered are in order, and the remaining properties are below them.

Now your object will look like this:

{           
  'HeartRate': 111,                              // <-----
  'HeartRateRegularity': 'Regular',              // <-----
  'DateTimeTaken': '/Date(1301494335000-0400)/',
  'Weight': 100909.090909091,
  'Height': 182.88,
  'SPO2': '222.00000',
  'BloodPressureSystolic': 120,
  'BloodPressureDiastolic': 80,
  'BloodPressurePosition': 'Standing',
  'VitalSite': 'Popliteal',
  'Laterality': 'Right',
  'CuffSize': 'XL',
  'Resprate': 111,    
  'Temperature': 36.6666666666667,
  'TemperatureMethod': 'Oral',    
  'HeadCircumference': '',    
}
3
  • This works great for me, except, when a key is zero (the number zero). It will ALWAYS come first, no matter what.
    – hitchhiker
    Mar 26, 2022 at 13:51
  • Do you mean const addObjectResource = Object.assign(objectOrder, addObjectResponse);? Confusing name conventions lead to spelling errors!
    – Joe Moore
    Jan 12, 2023 at 14:57
  • What if I hai properties that may not need to be present sometimes but when they are they need to be in a specific place?
    – Xfox
    Sep 6, 2023 at 9:02
23

I wrote this small algorithm which allows to move keys, it's like jQuery .insertAfter() method. You have to provide:

//currentKey: the key you want to move
//afterKey: position to move-after the currentKey, null or '' if it must be in position [0]
//obj: object


function moveObjectElement(currentKey, afterKey, obj) {
    var result = {};
    var val = obj[currentKey];
    delete obj[currentKey];
    var next = -1;
    var i = 0;
    if(typeof afterKey == 'undefined' || afterKey == null) afterKey = '';
    $.each(obj, function(k, v) {
        if((afterKey == '' && i == 0) || next == 1) {
            result[currentKey] = val; 
            next = 0;
        }
        if(k == afterKey) { next = 1; }
        result[k] = v;
        ++i;
    });
    if(next == 1) {
        result[currentKey] = val; 
    }
    if(next !== -1) return result; else return obj;
}

Example:

var el = {a: 1, b: 3, c:8, d:2 }
el = moveObjectElement('d', '', el); // {d,a,b,c}
el = moveObjectElement('b', 'd', el); // {d,b,a,c}
1
  • 20
    I like people who make impossible things possible.
    – ar2015
    Mar 7, 2018 at 23:10
13

I like the approved answer by Chamika Sandamal. Here's a simple function that uses their same logic with a little be of freedom to change the order as you need it.

function preferredOrder(obj, order) {
    var newObject = {};
    for(var i = 0; i < order.length; i++) {
        if(obj.hasOwnProperty(order[i])) {
            newObject[order[i]] = obj[order[i]];
        }
    }
    return newObject;
}

You give it an object, and an array of the key names you want, and returns a new object of those properties arranged in that order.

var data = {
    c: 50,
    a: 25,
    d: 10,
    b: 30
};

data = preferredOrder(data, [
    "a",
    "b",
    "c",
    "d"
]);

console.log(data);

/*
    data = {
        a: 25,
        b: 30,
        c: 50,
        d: 10
    }
*/

I'm copying and pasting from a big JSON object into a CMS and a little bit of re-organizing of the source JSON into the same order as the fields in the CMS has saved my sanity.

12

You can't order JavaScript object key/value pairs. It's stored in its own internal format, so you should never rely on the order of that. In JS, everything is an Object, even an Array. So sometimes you can introduce bugs when using array notation and object notation together (for x in var)

4
  • 3
    while this is true, this doesn't resemble real-world usage where templates are often rendered by looping over object properties. And when you loop over them, they have an order. Altering this order is... fragile, but IMO it should be added. Dec 20, 2016 at 15:52
  • 3
    I was also under same impression until I have seen this MDN page: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… The first line says The Map object holds key-value pairs and remembers the original insertion order of the keys
    – polavishnu
    Apr 25, 2019 at 16:50
  • 2
    This answer was correct at the time but is now outdated and incorrect: You can absolutly depend on the order of object keys starting with ECMAScript 6. It has become part of the JavaScript specification. See answer from @Tim Down or this link: 2ality.com/2015/10/property-traversal-order-es6.html Aug 7, 2021 at 9:52
  • It's possible to order the attributes of an object now a days.
    – shiponcs
    Oct 18, 2021 at 5:18
11

2020 Update

The answer below was correct at time of writing in 2011. However, since ES6, enumeration order has been specified as part of the language. Here's a nice article summarising this: https://2ality.com/2015/10/property-traversal-order-es6.html

Original answer

Properties of an object in JavaScript do not have an order. There may appear to be an order in some browsers but the ECMAScript specification defines object property enumeration order as being implementation-specific so you should not assume one browser's behaviour will be the same as another's. Chrome, for example, does not use the same ordering as some other browsers: see this lengthy bug report for at least as much discussion of this issue as you could possibly want.

If you need a specific order, use an array, or two arrays (one for keys and one for values).

7

You can use Object.keys():

var obj = {
    a: 1,
    b: 2,
    c: 4
};

var new_obj = {};

Object.keys(obj)
.sort(function(a, b) {
    /** Insert your custom sorting function here */
    return a - b;
})
.forEach(function(key) {
    new_obj[key] = obj[key];
});

obj = new_obj;
1
  • 1
    I did something just like this and the order was not preserved.
    – dardub
    Jul 18, 2019 at 14:12
6

if you want to manually reorder. simply create new object and assign values using old object.

var newObject= [{
    'DateTimeTaken': addObjectResponse.DateTimeTaken,
    'Weight': addObjectResponse.Weight,
    'Height': addObjectResponse.Height,
    'SPO2': addObjectResponse.SPO2 
}];
6
  • 25
    That has no more order than the original object. Object properties do not have a consistent enumeration order in JavaScript.
    – Tim Down
    Aug 6, 2011 at 15:29
  • 5
    There may be a use case where this is necessary, such as rendering an object with a templating library
    – amigolargo
    Jun 13, 2016 at 11:09
  • 4
    Object properties do have a consistent order in javascript, which is the order in which they are added. see Object.prototype.entries(someObject); Apr 23, 2018 at 12:58
  • 2
    @JayDayZee I did look it up. “The order of the array returned by Object.entries() does not depend on how an object is defined.” Feb 20, 2019 at 23:56
  • There is an ordering, but that ordering is not necessarily the ordering used by Object.entries. The order is integer keys, in ascending order, then string keys, in the order they were added, then symbol keys, in the order they were added. (tc39.es/ecma262/…). Feb 21, 2020 at 19:39
3

If you do not want to create a new object, you can use the following code snippet.

function orderKey(obj, keyOrder) {
    keyOrder.forEach((k) => {
        const v = obj[k]
        delete obj[k]
        obj[k] = v
    })
}

here is a codepen: https://codepen.io/zhangyanwei/pen/QJeRxB

4
  • This is an elegant solution, especially because it won't lose key:value pairs if the data being sent changes. However, you still need to know all of the keys. Any keys not identified in keyOrder will be at the front of the object. Feb 27, 2020 at 21:09
  • using Object.assign() will allow unknown key:pairs to be placed at the bottom. Feb 27, 2020 at 23:37
  • 1
    Also, sadly, this won't work for numeric keys
    – Berci
    Apr 9, 2021 at 18:53
  • This method is a little tricky. You should use a sorted array for keys rather than update the object. - that would be the safest approach.
    – 张焱伟
    Apr 15, 2021 at 7:30
2

I think that's not possible in JavaScript.

You can create an array which will contain the field names in your order and you can iterate through this array and fetch the fields from the actual object.

1
  • 1
    @John: I don't understand your comment. Aug 5, 2011 at 16:57
1

Spread syntax seems to provide full control over property ordering. Combined with Array.prototype.map() reordering using spread will be applied to every item in your list of objects.

let addObjectResponse = [{
    'DateTimeTaken': '/Date(1301494335000-0400)/',
    'Weight': 100909.090909091,
    'Height': 182.88,
    'HeartRate': 111,
  },
  {
    'DateTimeTaken': '/Date(1301494336000-0900)/',
    'Weight': 100888.090977791,
    'Height': 174.67,
    'HeartRate': 99,
  }
];

addObjectResponse = addObjectResponse.map(item => {
  return {
    DateTimeTaken: item.DateTimeTaken,
    HeartRate: item.HeartRate + 1,
    ...item
  }
})

/*
[
  {
    DateTimeTaken: '/Date(1301494335000-0400)/',
    HeartRate: 111,
    Weight: 100909.090909091,
    Height: 182.88
  },
  {
    DateTimeTaken: '/Date(1301494336000-0900)/',
    HeartRate: 99,
    Weight: 100888.090977791,
    Height: 174.67
  }
]
*/

1
  • If HeartRate is also in your original item, it will overwrite your value. But you can fix that by using ...rest. a = a.map(item => { const { HeartRate, ...rest } = item; return { HeartRate: newHeartRateFromSensor, ...rest } }) Mar 28 at 18:15
0

Just refer to the object keys in the order that you like:

aKeys = [
  addObjectResponse[0].DateTimeTaken,
  addObjectResponse[0].Weight,
  addObjectResponse[0].Height,
  ...etc...
]
0

I wrote a quick function in TypeScript that takes 2 arguments. The first is the array of objects you want to change the keys of, the second is an array of strings that represent the order of keys you'd like returned.

type GenericObject = Record<string, any> | null;

const order:Function = (data: Array<GenericObject>, order: Array<string>): Array<GenericObject> => {
    return data.map((node) => {
        return order.reduce((runningValue, currentValue) => {
            return Object.assign(runningValue, { [currentValue]: node?.[currentValue]});
        }, {});
    });
};

And here is an example of calling it:

const data: Array<GenericObject> = [
    { b: 1, a: 2},
    { b: 3, a: 4},
];

const orderIWant: Array<string> = ['a', 'b'];

const ordered: Array<GenericObject> = order(data, orderIWant);

console.log(ordered); 
// [ { a: 2, b: 1 }, { a: 4, b: 3 } ]
-1
function orderKeys(obj, keys){
    const newObj = {};
    for(let key of keys){
        newObj[key] = obj[key];
    }
    return newObj;
}
-1

keysInOrder below is an array of ordered keys you need first. Remaining keys will be added in the existing sequence

function orderKeys(obj, keysInOrder) {
  let newObj = {};
  for (key of keysInOrder)
    if (Object.keys(obj).includes(key) && !Object.keys(newObj).includes(key))
      newObj[key] = obj[key];
  for (key of Object.keys(obj))
    if (!Object.keys(newObj).includes(key))
      newObj[key] = obj[key];
  return newObj;
}
1

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