9

nginx access.log. It is delimited by 1) white space 2) [ ] and 3) double quotes.

::1 - - [12/Oct/2021:15:26:25 +0530] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 1717 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/94.0.4606.81 Safari/537.36"
::1 - - [12/Oct/2021:15:26:25 +0530] "GET /css/custom.css HTTP/1.1" 200 202664 "https://localhost/" "Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/94.0.4606.81 Safari/537.36"

after parsing it supposed to look like

$1 = ::1

$4 = [12/Oct/2021:15:26:25 +0530] or 12/Oct/2021:15:26:25 +0530

$5 = "GET / HTTP/1.1"

$6 = 200

$7 = 1717

$8 = "-"

$9 = "Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/94.0.4606.81 Safari/537.36"

I tried some options like awk -F'[],] *' awk -f [][{}] , but they doesn't work with full line.

nginx access.log shared here is just an example. I am trying to understand how to parse with mix of such delimiters for usages in other complex logs.

6
  • 2
    Personally, I'd turn to perl using a module like HTTPD::Log::Filter or Nginx::ParseLog.
    – Shawn
    Oct 17, 2021 at 5:10
  • What you shows looks like Apache Log Format for me httpd.apache.org/docs/2.4/logs.html
    – Daweo
    Oct 17, 2021 at 5:40
  • @Daweo - in that case apache and nginx sharing the default log format
    – GLK
    Oct 17, 2021 at 5:44
  • 1
    @RavinderSingh13 - thanks. btw, my tried code is in one of the answer, and if you see the logs, you will find that it was added before any other answer.
    – GLK
    Oct 19, 2021 at 14:47
  • 1
    @GLK, yeah I had seen it already but it's highly encouraged to keep efforts in questions else you may get close votes OR downvotes on this question, which we don't want on this Good question ☺️ keep it up, keep asking good Q & A on this great site cheers 👍 Oct 19, 2021 at 14:49

6 Answers 6

7

If you can use gnu-awk you can make use of FPAT to specify the column data:

awk -v FPAT='\\[[^][]*]|"[^"]*"|\\S+' '{
  for(i=1; i<=NF; i++) {
    print "$"i" = ", $i
  }
}' file

The pattern matches:

  • \\[[^][]*] Match from an opening [ till closing ] using a negated character class
  • | Or
  • "[^"]*" Match from an opening till closing double quote
  • | Or
  • \\S+ 1 or more non whitespace chars

Output

$1 =  ::1
$2 =  -
$3 =  -
$4 =  [12/Oct/2021:15:26:25 +0530]
$5 =  "GET / HTTP/1.1"
$6 =  200
$7 =  1717
$8 =  "-"
$9 =  "Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/94.0.4606.81 Safari/537.36"
5

Since these are nginx logs so their format will be same(OR there are settings by which you can keep logs same, talking about current versions). We can take advantage of this feature moreover we can concentrate on only getting needed parts, so I am using regex here to get only matched values and leave not needed values simple. By following this we need NOT to hardcode the field numbers, using regex will do the trick here.

This should work in any awk version.

awk '
{
  while(match($0,/^::[0-9]+|\[?[0-9]{1,2}\/[a-zA-Z]{3}\/[0-9]{4}(:[0-9]{2}){3}\s+\+[0-9]{4}\]?|"[^"]*"|\s[0-9]{3}\s|[0-9]+\s/)){
    val=substr($0,RSTART,RLENGTH)
    gsub(/^[[:space:]]+|[[:space:]]+$/,"",val)
    print val
    $0=substr($0,RSTART+RLENGTH)
  }
}'  Input_file
3

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -E 'y/ /\n/
       :a;s/^(\[[^]\n]*)\n/\1 /m;s/^("[^"\n]*)\n/\1 /m;ta
       s/.*/echo '\''&'\'' | cat -n/e
       s/^  *(\S)\t/$\1 = /mg' file

Replace all spaces by newlines.

Group all lines that begin and end in either [ and ] or double quotes and replace newlines by spaces.

Number all the lines.

Remove leading spaces and tabs and format the result.

2

basic piped awk with 3 steps

  1. parsed square bracket with -F'[][]
  2. parsed double quotes with -F'\"'
  3. printed results

parse access.log to json

awk -F'[][]' '{ print "remote_addr "$1 "local_time "$2 $3 }' access.log | awk -F'\"' '{ print $1   " method-&-path "$2 "  respStatus-&-byteSent " $3 " http_referer " $4 " http_agent " $6 } ' | awk  '{print " { \"remote_addr\" : \""$2"\" , \"local_time\" : \""$6 "\" , \"method\" : \""$9"\" , \"path\" : \""$10"\" , \"resp_status\" : \""$13"\" , \"bytes_sent\" : \""$14"\" , \"http_referer\" : \""$16"\" , \"http_agent\" : \""$18"   "$19" "$20" "$21" "$22" "$23" "$24" "$25" "$26" "$27" "$28" "$29"\"}"}'

Output

{ "remote_addr" : "::1" , "local_time" : "12/Oct/2021:15:26:25" , "method" : "GET" , "path" : "/css/custom.css" , "resp_status" : "200" , "bytes_sent" : "202664" , "http_referer" : "https://localhost/" , "http_agent" : "Mozilla/5.0   (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/94.0.4606.81 Safari/537.36  "}

parse access.log, display fields and values both

awk -F'[][]' '{ print "remote_addr "$1 "local_time "$2 $3 }' access.log | awk -F'\"' '{ print $1   " method-&-path "$2 "  respStatus-&-byteSent " $3 " http_referer " $4 " http_agent " $6 } ' | awk -F' ' '{print "remote_addr"$2", local_time "$6 ", method "$9", path "$10", resp_status "$13", bytes_sent "$14", http_referer "$16", http_agent "$18"  "$19" "$20" "$21" "$22" "$23" "$24" "$25" "$26" "$27" "$28" "$29 }'

Output

remote_addr::1, local_time 12/Oct/2021:15:26:25, method GET, path /, resp_status 200, bytes_sent 1717, http_referer -, http_agent Mozilla/5.0  (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/94.0.4606.81 Safari/537.36  
0
1

GNU awk

gawk '
    match($0, /([^[:blank:]]+) ([^[:blank:]]+) ([^[:blank:]]+) \[([^]]+)\] "([^"]+)" ([[:digit:]]+) ([[:digit:]]+) "([^"]+)" "([^"]+)"/, m) {
        for (i=1; i<=9; i++) print i, m[i]
    }
' file

Or perl for more concise regexes

perl -nsE '
    if (/(\S+) (\S+) (\S+) \[(.+?)\] "(.+?)" (\d+) (\d+) "(.+?)" "(.+?)"/) {
        for $i (1..9) { say $i, $$i }
    }
' -- -,=" " file

Or with named captures, which would make it simpler to work with (but I'm reinventing the modules mentioned by @Shawn):

perl -MData::Dump=dd -nE '
    dd \%+ if (/
        (?<host>\S+) \s
        (?<ident>\S+) \s
        (?<user>\S+) \s
        \[(?<timestamp>.+?)\] \s
        "(?<request>.+?)" \s
        (?<status>\d+) \s
        (?<size>\d+) \s
        "(?<referer>.+?)" \s
        "(?<user_agent>.+?)"
    /x)
' file
0

I am trying to understand how to parse with mix of such delimiters for usages in other complex logs.

Setting just Field Separator in GNU AWK will not suffice for this case, take look at

::1 - - [12/Oct/2021:15:26:25 +0530] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 1717 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/94.0.4606.81 Safari/537.36"
::1 - - [12/Oct/2021:15:26:25 +0530] "GET /css/custom.css HTTP/1.1" 200 202664 "https://localhost/" "Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/94.0.4606.81 Safari/537.36"
  • spaces which are inside [ and ] are not separators
  • spaces which are inside " are not separators
  • all other spaces are separators

So far I know it is impossible to craft such pattern suitable for Field Separator which would correctly detect only spaces which are separators.

2
  • I think I have done it, testing as of now..
    – GLK
    Oct 17, 2021 at 10:44
  • @GLK you chained multiple awks, whilst I though you need single one
    – Daweo
    Oct 17, 2021 at 18:02

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