12

Lately, I've been writing a lot of code that looks like this:

List<MyObject> myList = new List<MyObject>();
...
for(int i = 0; i < myList.Count; ++i)
{
  if(/*myList[i] meets removal criteria*/)
  {
     myList.RemoveAt(i);
     --i;  //Check this index again for the next item
     //Do other stuff as well
  }
}

and I just became a little paranoid that maybe List doesn't retain object order at removal. I don't know the C# spec well enough to know for sure. Can someone verify that I either am or am not asking for trouble with this pattern?

EDIT: Perhaps I should clarify that the above is a very simplified example and more things happen if the item needs to be removed so I don't think List<T>.RemoveAll() is terribly applicable here. Although it is a nice function. I have added a comment in the if() block above to specifically mention that.

7
  • 4
    Just a side note: You should loop through the list backwards instead of forward. Say you remove list[1] (i = 1). This will cause the list to shift, where the element at list[2] is now at list[1]. Now when you jump to i = 2, you've skipped the element that now sits in list[1].
    – Jason Down
    Aug 5, 2011 at 19:33
  • 1
    You should be able to greatly simplify this pattern with the RemoveAll() method Aug 5, 2011 at 19:34
  • Why don't you use linq for that?
    – Ortiga
    Aug 5, 2011 at 19:35
  • @Jason, very good point about iterating backward. Thanks. Aug 5, 2011 at 19:43
  • @chaosTechnician based on your update the pattern in my response should be applicable. Aug 5, 2011 at 19:59

6 Answers 6

15

List<T> will always maintain relative order when adding, inserting and removing; it wouldn't be a list if it didn't.

Here's the (ILSpy'ed) code for RemoveAt():

public void RemoveAt(int index)
{
    if (index >= this._size)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    }
    this._size--;
    if (index < this._size)
    {
        Array.Copy(this._items, index + 1, this._items, index, this._size - index);
    }
    this._items[this._size] = default(T);
    this._version++;
}

Note the array copy from index + 1 to index; that's the items being shifted wholesale and "squeezing" the array together. But there is definitely no re-ordering of the elements.

1
  • Aside from the additional (very helpful) conversation about running through the list in reverse and considering RemoveAll(), this answers the question I actually asked. Thanks! Aug 5, 2011 at 20:04
10

You are indeed right, List<T>.RemoveAt will not change the order of the items of the list.

Your snippet could however be simplified to use List<T>.RemoveAll like this:

List<MyObject> myList = new List<MyObject>();
...
myList.RemoveAll(/* Removal predicate */);

Edit following comment:

myList.Where(/* Removal predicate */).ToList().ForEach(/* Removal code */);
myList.RemoveAll(/* Removal predicate */);
6
  • This should also protect against the list shifting as each element is removed (skipping the element directly after the one that was removed). I'd suggest moving through the list in reverse order, but his is much better!
    – Jason Down
    Aug 5, 2011 at 19:35
  • I've updated my original question to say that since I'm doing more than simply removing the item, I don't think RemoveAll() will do the trick for me. Aug 5, 2011 at 19:44
  • @chaosTechnician - it's likely you could make the code clearer by using RemoveAll() and then making a second pass through the filtered list. You could use myList.ForEach for that. Aug 5, 2011 at 19:54
  • @Daniel, the extra code is only executed when the item is supposed to be deleted (i.e., when the predicate is true), not on the remaining items. Aug 5, 2011 at 19:58
  • 1
    @Cicada, Wow, very elegant. I really ought to stop coding C# like it's C++ with easier memory management so I learn about these things... Aug 5, 2011 at 20:08
5

The order should be maintained. A better approach is to traverse the list in reverse:

for(int i = myList.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
{
    if(/*myList[i] meets removal criteria*/)
    {
        myList.RemoveAt(i);
    }
}

Or you could use the RemoveAll method:

myList.RemoveAll(item => [item meets removal criteria]);
1
  • 4
    @Kyle the reverse for loop is easier to follow and doesn't require the index to be decremented once the criteria is met. By starting at the end of the list and working backwards, the for loop will continue to be accurate if an item is removed. As for RemoveAll, it's a one-liner with a predicate and doesn't require us to loop over the list and manage the index. Aug 5, 2011 at 19:38
5

Although the accepted answer is a great answer to the original question, Cicada's answer suggests an alternative approach.

With CLR 4 (VS 2010) we gain yet another approach, which has the further advantage of only executing the predicate once per item (and making it convenient to avoid writing the predicate twice in our code).

Suppose you have a IEnumerable<string>:

IEnumerable<string> myList = new[] {"apples", "bananas", "pears", "tomatoes"};

You need to divide it into two lists according to whether the items pass some criteria:

var divided = myList.ToLookup(i => i.Length > 6);

The returned object is somewhat like a Dictionary of lists. Suppose you want to keep the ones that pass the criteria:

 myList = divided[true];

And you can use a familiar imperative loop to operate on the other items:

foreach (var item in divided[false])
    Console.WriteLine("Removed " + item);

Note that there is no need to use List<T> specifically. We never modify an existing list - we just make new ones.

0
3

From Reflector:

public void RemoveAt(int index)
{
    if (index >= this._size)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    }
    this._size--;
    if (index < this._size)
    {
        Array.Copy(this._items, index + 1, this._items, index, this._size - index);
    }
    this._items[this._size] = default(T);
    this._version++;
}

So at least with MS' implementation - items' order doesn't change on RemoveAt.

2

When you call RemoveAt, all the elements following the index you remove will be copied and shifted forward.

Sort the positions list in descending order and remove elements in that order.

foreach (var position in positions.OrderByDescending(x=>x))
   list.RemoveAt(position);

positions is the list of indexes. list is the one you want to delete from (it contains the actual data).

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